Documentary History of American Water-Works

Introduction Historical Background Chronology Geography Biography Technology Ownership and Financing General Bibliography
Middle Atlantic States New York New York City

New York City, New York

New York City was first settled by Europeans when the Dutch arrived 1624. 

The first water works were built by Christopher Colles in 1774, but the arrival of the British Army in August 1776 ended the project while the works were being tested.

In 1799, the Manhattan Company was chartered to distribute water in Manhattan, and distributed well water through wooden pipes. 

The City of New York constructed a water tank and iron pipes for fire protection in 1830.  Using the Croton River as a water supply was proposed in the early 1800s.  After years of study and planning, voters approved the Croton Aqueduct in April, 1835 by a vote of 17,330 to 5,963. The estimated cost was $4,250,000.  Construction began in 1837 on the impounding reservoir and aqueduct.  This first, or Old Croton Aqueduct, was placed in service on June 22, 1842 with a large celebration on October 14, 1842.  


Profile and Ground Plan of the Lower Part of the Croton Aqueduct, by John B. Jervis (1843),
From the collection of John B. Jervis drawings at the Jervis Public Library.

The aqueduct was 41 miles long and was designed to deliver a maximum of 60 million imperial gallons (72,018,000 US gallons) with an area of 53.34 square feet. The capacity was increased to 95 million US gallons by raising the water level above the spring line.  At one point about 103 million gallons passed through the aqueduct in a single day, but damaged the structure. 





A receiving reservoir was built in Central Park south of 86th Street (discontinued in 1925) and a distribution reservoir was located in Manhattan's Murray Hill between 41st and 42nd Street on Fifth Avenue (discontinued in 1890).  This reservoir held 20 million imperial gallons or 24,006,000 U.S. gallons, and when full, the water level of 114 feet, 10 inches above mean tide was enough to theoretically supply water to the top floors of every building in the built up area of the city south of that location.  Unfortunately, during periods of high water demand the water would often not even reach to the second floor of many buildings at a time when taller buildings were being constructed.  This forced building owners to install wood cisterns on roofs to insure a supply of water to upper floors, which are still common in the city.  Water was forced into the cisterns by pumps driven by water motors, hot air engines, manufactured and natural gas, and eventually electricity.  One company in 1870 proposed using windmills, but apparently only advertised once.

New reservoirs were constructed to increase supply: Boyds Corner in 1873 and Middle Branch in 1878. In 1883 a commission was formed to build a second aqueduct from the Croton watershed as well as additional storage reservoirs. This second, or New Croton Aqueduct, was under construction from 1885 to 1893 and was placed in service in 1890, while still under construction. and after much study decided to impound the water of the Croton River and deliver it through an aqueduct. 

The Croton System includes the First or Old Croton Aqueduct completed with a celebration on October 14, 1842, and a Second or New Croton  Aqueduct was first used on July 14, 1890.  Both the old and new aqueducts are shown in this map:


Map of the route of the new Croton Aqueduct, present aqueduct and Bronx River pipe line also the watersheds of the Croton, Bronx and Byram rivers,
by Benjamin Silliman Church (1887)

The City decided to develop the Catskill region as an additional water source in the early 20th Century and proceeded to plan and construct facilities to impound the waters of the Esopus Creek, one of the four watersheds in the Catskills, and to deliver the water throughout the City. This project, to develop what is known as the Catskill System, included the Ashokan Reservoir and Catskill Aqueduct and was completed in 1917. The construction of the Schoharie Reservoir and Shandaken Tunnel was completed in 1928.

New York City studied the potential to take water from the Delaware River watershed in the mid-1920s, and the project was approved in 1928.  After delays caused by New Jersey appealing to the U.S.Supreme Court, construction began in March 1937 with the Delaware Aqueduct opening in 1944, Rondout Reservoir in 1950, Neversink Reservoir in 1954. Pepacton Reservoir in 1955 and Cannonsville Reservoir in 1964.  The Delaware System includes an Aqueduct completed in 1944 and several reservoirs to deliver water from the Delaware River.

New York City acquired two other municipal water systems from the 1898 consolidation, including Brooklyn and Long Island City.  Several other private water systems continued to operate for many years.

Water is currently provided by the City of New York, which has provided a History of New York City's Water Supply System and a map of New York City's Water Supply System.

 

References
1806 The Evening Post, December 30, 1806, Page 3.
The Bronx, Croton, and Sawmill rivers, or any two of them; will furnish that ample supply.

1823 National Advocate, December 4, 1822, Page 2.
Extract from a letter addressed by Benjamin Wright, Esq. to a member of the Canal Committee in Sharon, Connecticut, dated Rome, (N Y) Sept. 16.
Seeing some notice in the newspapers relative to a canal from Sharon and into Dover, and from thence gaining waters of the Croton River, and following it to its entrance and into the Hudson, and examining the maps and reflecting on the importance of conveying a considerable body of water into the city of New-York, (which I have long considered as absolutely indispensable to the health of the city) I have been speculating upon the probability of connecting the two objects of Canal, and supply the city with abundance of water; believing, that to obtain that supply, resort must be had to Croton River.

1823 An act to incorporate the New-York and Sharon Canal Company.  April 19, 1823.

1823 National Advocate, July 28, 1823, Page 2.
New York & Sharon Canal. It is said the survey made last fall by Mr. White, an experienced engineer, at the expence of the city, ended, like all the former, in a decided opinion, that it was impracticable to obtain water from any other source, to be relied on, except the Croton; and that at an expence (as then contemplated,) beyond our means.

1824 Canvass White's Report, January 28, 1824
Page 19:  It has been ascertained by experiments made at Philadelphia, that twenty-seven gallons per day for each person, is sufficient for the demands in summer, and this includes the amount used for all purposes of manufacturing by brewers, tanners, livery stables, and for washing the gutters, &c.

1824 Benjamin Wright's Report, January 28, 1824 [Note the 1834 date on the report is incorrect.]

1825 "Outline of a Project to Supply the City of New York with Water," by "Fulton", from American Mechanics' Magazine, 1(13):203 (April 30, 1825)  Recommends use of Croton River.

1826 Report to the directors of the New-York Water Works Company, Canvass White, engineer of the New-York Water Works Company, January 9, 1826 | also here |
Page 4:  If we allow twenty gallons for the consumption of each person daily, we shall have a supply for a population of 450,000 inhabitants; the allowance of twenty gallons will be ample to cover the quantity that may be required for factories and other purposes.

1830 Extracts from Memorial of Francis E. Phelps, May 17, 1830

1831 Report Relative to Introducing a Supply of Water, December 28, 1831.  This includes many documents relating to the introduction of water into New York City.

1832 Report of Colonel De Witt Clinton on potential water supplies for the City of New York, December 22, 1832 | also here |

1833 An act for the appointment of commissioners in relation to supplying the city of New-York with pure and whole some water. Passed February 26, 1833.

1833 Report Of the Commissioners, under an act of the Legislature of this State, passed February 26, 1833, relative to supplying the city of New-York with pure and wholesome water. New- York, December 31, 1833. | also here |
Page 12:  The Commissioners have adopted 22 gallons for each inhabitant of the city of New-York, as the quantity required for every purpose, which will make it necessary that 6,600,000 gallons should be delivered at the distributing reservoir every 24 hours.  The Commissioners have shown, however, that five or six times that quantity may be obtained, and brought to the city, if required.

1834 Board of Aldermen, April 21, 1834. : The Committee on Fire and Water presented the following report, enclosing letters form D.J. Rhoads, Esq. and James Seymour, Esq. relating to supplying the city of New-York with pure and wholesome Water, Daniel J. Rhoads of Philadelphia, James Seymour, Erie Railroad, Document 109

1834  AN ACT to provide for supplying the city of New-York with pure and wholesome water. Passed May 2, 1834.

1835 Board of Aldermen, February 16, 1835: the following report was received from the Commissioners appointed, pursuant to a law passed by the legislature, on the 2d of May 1834, in relation to supplying the City of New-York with pure and wholesome water, which was referred to the Committee on Fire and Water | Also here |

1835 Board of Aldermen, March 4, 1835: the Committee on Fire and Water, to whom was referred the report of the Water Commissioners, and the documents accompanying the same, in relation to supplying the City of New-York with pure and wholesome water, presented the following report | Also here | and here |

1835 Spring water, versus river water, for supplying the city of New-York ... : also an examination of the Water Commissioners report of Nov. 1833, by Moses Hale

1835 Exposition of errors in the calculation of the Board of Water Commissioners, by John L. Sullivan.

1836 Board of Aldermen, February 15th, 1836: the following communication was received from his Honor the Mayor, enclosing a communication from Stephen Allen, Esq., Chairman of the Water Commissioners, and from D.B. Douglass, Esq., Chief Engineer, N.Y. Aqueduct, in relation to the practicability and probable expense of forcing by steam engines a sufficient quantity of water from the North or East River to a reservoir to be erected on Murray Hill, in aid of the present means for extinguishing fires, which was referred to the Committee on Fire and Water

1836 An act to amend an act, entitled "An act to provide for supplying the city of New-York with pure and wholesome water," passed May 2, 1834.  May 26, 1836.

1836 Report of the Water Commissioners, August 1, 1836

1836 Report of the Water Commissioners, August 1, 1836 to January 1, 1837.

1837 Semi-Annual report of the Water Commissioners for the city of New York, from January 1st to the 30th of June, 1837.

1837 An act to provide for such alterations in the line or route of the Croton turnpike road or highway in the county of Westchester, as many be rendered necessary by the plan adopted for supplying the city of New-York with pure and wholesome water, under and by virtue or the act for that purpose, passed May 2d, 1834.  May 5, 1837.

1837 Semi-annual Report of the Water Commissioners: From the 1st of July to 30th December, 1837,

1838 An act to amend an act entitled "An act to provide for supplying the city of New-York with pure and wholesome water," passed May 2, 1834.  March 29, 1838.  Additional $3 million.

1839 An act prescribing the manner in which the Croton aqueduct shall pass the Harlem river.  May 3, 1839.

1839 "The Croton Aqueduct," New York Herald, July 18, 1839, Page 2.  This article was reprinted in London's Mechanics Magazine, No. 844:24-26 (October 12, 1839).
The whole cost of the works, according to the contracts, including that for the low bridge at Harlem (the first plan) is 8,500,000 dollars; and now an additional 400,000 dollars is added for the high bridge, the contracts for which are to be completed the 29th of this month; making, according to these estimates, a little than 9,000,000 dollars, exclusive of the pipes from the distributing reservoir. There is little doubt, however, in the minds of the contractors that, before the water is delivered in the houses of our citizens, the sum of at least 12,000,000 dollars will be expended on the work. The low bridge was estimated to cost 450,000 dollars; the high bridge, 850,000 dollars, and the tunnel under the river, (the entire breadth of the stream, and not merely the channel,) differing from the Thames Tunnel by being worked through a coffer dam, was to cost 350,000 dollars. The whole of the iron pipes to carry the water across the river have been constructed for by Mr. Gouverneur Kemble, for 350,000 dollars.
The water is to be carried over Harlem River in two three feet pipes at present; which it is thought will suffice to supply the city with water for fifty or one hundred years to come, when they are to be taken up and replaced by four feet pipes. The high bridge will be composed of fifteen arches, eight of eighty feet span, and seven of fifty feet span. The aqueduct, where it crosses the Harlem River, will be very nearly one hundred and twenty feet above the level of tide water. At the dam above Sing Sing, the surface of the water is forty feet above the original surface of the river, (which rises in Putnam County, and has several sources from ponds and small lakes in the mountains,) and the bed of which has an average width of one hundred and fifty feet. The grade of the aqueduct at the dam is one hundred and sixty-six feet above tide water at New York, and the surface of the dam is twelve feet above the grade of the aqueduct. The pond of water caused by the dam will cover more than four hundred acres of ground; and the water will enter the aqueduct at the dam through a tunnel one hundred and fifty fret long. When the aqueduct is full, the water will move through it at the rate of nearly two feet a second, the conduit having an uniform descent of thirteen inches to the mile, from the dam to the distributing reservoir: where it will be able to discharge forty-nine and a half millions of imperial gallons of water every twenty-four hours. And calculating that every man, woman, and child in this city will each consume five gallons of water every twenty-four hours, (a fair estimate) the aqueduct can supply a population of ten millions, or more than the island of Manhattan *ill contain at the day of judgment.
Along the entire line of this truly noble work, the hydraulic cement is exclusively employed. This is obtained from different parts of the state, along the river and is made from a species of subcarbonate of iron, which is found in a state of close mechanical mixture with sulphate of lime, magnesia, and a small portion of silex. This stone when found is burned, like common limestone, and then ground instead of being slacked with water, put in barrels, and carefully excluded from the air; and none is allowed to be used that has been ground more than a month.
The quantity of brick used along the line may be estimated from the fact, that about 2,000,000 are required to form a mile of the aqueduct, making a total of about from 85,000,000 to 90,000,000 of brick for the entire work.

1839 "Account of the Croton Aqueduct for Supplying New York with Water," The Mechanics' Magazine, Museum, Register, Journal and Gazette, 32:24-16 (October 12, 1839)

1839 Semi-annual report of the Water Commissioners from July 1, to December 31, 1839.

1840 "Reminiscences of the late Washington Irving," from The Knickerbocker: Or, New-York Monthly Magazine, 55:439-444 (April, 1860)
Pages 442-443:  Greenbush, March 17, 1840.
My DEAR SIR: In consequence of not sending to the post-office for several days, I did not receive your letter calling so lustily for help, until yesterday (Monday) after post-hours. I have nothing at hand to send to you; and I fear if I had, it would come too late. We have nothing new in these parts, excepting that there has been the deuce to pay of late in Sleepy Hollow, a circumstance, by-the-by, with which you of New-York have some concern, as it is connected with your Croton Aqueduct. This work traverses a thick wood, about the lower part of the Hollow, not far from the old Dutch haunted church: and in the heart of the wood, an immense culvert, or stone arch, is thrown across the wizard stream of the Pocantico, to support the Aqueduct. As the work is unfinished, a colony of Patlanders have been encamped about this place all winter, forming a kind of Patsylvania, in the midst of a ‘wiltherness.' Now, whether it is that they have heard the old traditionary stories about the Hollow, (which, all fanciful fabling and idle scribbling apart, is really one of the most haunted places in this part of the country,) or whether the goblins of the Hollow, accustomed only to tolerate the neighborhood of the old Dutch families, have resented this intrusion into their solitudes, by strangers of an unknown tongue, certain it is, that the poor Paddies have been most grievously harried, for some time past, by all kinds of apparitions. A wagonroad cut through the woods, and leading from their encampment past the haunted church, and so on to certain whiskey establishments, has been especially beset by the foul fiends: and the worthy Patlanders, on their way home at night, beheld misshapen monsters whisking about their paths; sometimes resembling men, sometimes boys, sometimes horses; but invariably without heads: which shows that they must be lineal descendants from the old Goblin of the Hollow. These imps of darkness have grown more and more vexatious in their pranks, occasionally tripping up or knocking down the unlucky object of their hostility. In a word, the whole wood has become such a scene of spuking and diablerie, that the Paddies will not any longer venture out of their shanties at night: and a whiskey-shop in a neighboring village, where they used to hold their evening gatherings, has been obliged to shut up, for want of custom. This is a true story, and you may account for it as you please. The corporation of your city should look to it; for if this harrying continues, I should not be surprised if the Paddies, tired of being cut off from their whiskey, should entirely abandon the goblin regions of Sleepy Hollow, and the completion of the Croton water-works be seriously retarded.
Yours Very Truly, Washington Irving

1840 The diary of Philip Hone, 1828-1851, edited, with an introduction by Allan Nevins. (1927)
Page 472:  April 7, 1840. – Riot on the Water Works.  There has been a flare-up amongst the Irish laborers on the Croton Aqueduct occasioned by the contractors reducing their wages from one dollar to seventy-five cents a day. Large numbers turned out, and marching down from Westchester to Harlem prevented others from working, and committed some acts of violence upon the workers.

1840 An act further to amend an act entitled "An act to provide for supplying the city of New-York with pure and wholesome water," passed May 2, 1834.  April 27, 1840.  Additional $3 million.

1840 An act to regulate the place and manner of assessing and taxing the Croton aqueduct. May 7, 1840.

1840 "Correspondence between Samuel Stevens and Major David B. Douglass," Morning Courier and New-York Enquirer, October 28, 1840, Page 1.

1840 "Editorial comment," Morning Courier and New-York Enquirer, October 28, 1840, Page 2.

1840 "Letter from John B. Jervis," Morning Courier and New-York Enquirer, November 3, 1840, Page 2.

1840 "Letter from Stephen Allen," Morning Courier and New-York Enquirer, November 12, 1840, Page 2.

1840 Semi-annual report of the Water commissioners from 20th March, 1840, to the 31st December, 1840

1841 An act to amend an act entitled "An act to provide for supplying the city of New-York with pure and wholesome water," passed May 2, 1834.  May 26, 1841.  Additional $3.5 million.

1842 "Croton Water," New York Tribune, April 21, 1842, Page 2.
The Commissioner of the Croton Aqueduct gives notice that the water will probably be let into the distribution pipes on or before the Fourth of July next.  The following is the Tariff of prices fixed for the privilege of using the Croton Water:

Annual Charges
Dwellings of two stories $10
       "        of more than two stories  12
       "        on the back of lots 5
       "        with workshop or stores 12 to 20
Privilege of washing pavements 3
       "           bath, where there are fixtures 5
Warehouse 15
Boarding house 10 to 20
Stables, private per stall 5
      "      livery        " 2
Charge by measure
Hotels, breweries, tanneries, public baths, maufactories, salting or packing houses, steam engines, and large consumers generally per hhd. of 100 gallons 5 cts
Shipping 25 cts

1842 Semi-annual Report of the Water Commissioners, August 1, 1842.

1842 "The Croton Water Debt," New York Tribune, August 3, 1842, Page 2.
How can this money be most conveniently and equitably raised?  Three modes have been suggested, viz;
1st.  By increasing the general tax on real and personal property sufficient to raise the whole amount, and allow the water to be free.
2d.  By allowing as many as soon to take the water at an annual, rent and raising the balance by an increase of the general tax.
3d.  By assess upon the houses and lots in all streets where distributing pipes are, or may be laid, a sufficient amount to pay the whole of the interest and other charges.

1842 The Evening Post (New York), August 12, 1842, Page 2.
The Public Health - Mineral Poisons - The Croton Water - Lead Pipe and Lead Colic by Theobald Mathew, Jr.

1842 "Report of the Joint Croton Aqueduct Committee on the Rules and Regulations for the Supply of the Croton Water," September 26, 1842.
Pages 189-190:  Rules and Regulations (in part) respecting the Distribution of the Croton Water.
Public Hydrants shall be erected or prepared, under the direction of the Croton Aqueduct Board, subject to the approval of the Joint Croton Aqueduct Committee, and with due regard to prudent despatch and reasonable expenditure, at proper locations in the city, for the purpose of freely dispensing the water for personal and domestic use.
These Hydrants shall first be introduced into Districts containing the greater proportion of poor inhabitants.
Private families, who wish to be supplied with the water, shall be at the whole expense of leading the same into their dwellings, under such regulations as the Croton Aqueduct Board may determine; and shall pay in advance, for the use of the water, at and after the following rates per annum:
For an ordinary two-story Dwelling House, ten dollars.
For an ordinary Dwelling House of three stories or more, twelve dollars.
For an ordinary Dwelling House, not exceeding $1,500 in value, situated on the rear of a lot, five dollars.
The reasonable use of the water for a Bath, and for cleaning the street, windows and yard, will be permitted to private families, paying the above rates, without additional Cost.
Private families who have paid beyond these rates, will be credited for the excess on their future contracts.
By order of the Croton Aqueduct Board:
(Signed) JOHN L. LAWRENCE, President. 
September 21, 1842.

1842 Description of the Croton Aqueduct, October 14, 1842, by John Bloomfield Jervis, Chief Engineer
Page 31:  The supply of the Croton, from its daily flow, aided by this reservoir, may therefore be taken with taken confidence at 35,000,000 gallons; which will be very ample for a long time to come; and when the day arrives that it will require a larger quantity, it may be obtained by constructing other reservoirs further up the stream, where there are abundant facilities for such purposes.

1842 Report of the Croton Aqueduct Board in Relation to the Ways and Means of Paying the Croton Water Debt, December 27, 1842, New York Croton Aqueduct Board

1842 "Croton Aqueduct", from Memoirs of the Most Eminent American Mechanics: Also, Lives of Distinguished European Mechanics ; Together with a Collection of Anecdotes, Descriptions & Etc. Relating to the Mechanic Arts by Henry Howe

1843 Resolution providing for the erection of free hydrants, April 15, 1843, from By-laws and Ordinances of the Mayor, Alderman, and Commonalty of the City of New York (1845)

1843 Journal and Documents of the Board of Assistants of the City of New-York, Volume 21, November 2, 1842 to May 18, 1843.  Includes several reference and proposals for Croton water rates.

1843 Annual Report of the Croton Aqueduct Board, Presented, May 29th, 1843.
Page 32:  The free hydrants, contemplated when the erection of the Water-works was sanctioned by the vote of the electors of the city, are now in rapid progress of introduction, about sixty being laid down each week, and a number equal to that of the public pumps will probably be placed in proper positions throughout the city, during the present season.

1843 A Memoir of the Construction, Cost, and Capacity of the Croton Aqueduct: Compiled from Official Documents : Together with an Account of the Civic Celebration of the Fourteenth October, 1842, on Occasion of the Completion of the Great Work : Preceded by a Preliminary Essay on Ancient and Modern Aqueducts by Charles King

1843 Illustrations of the Croton Aqueduct by F. B. [Fayette Bartholomew] Tower of the Engineer Department | also here |
Page 78:  The Aqueduct is calculated to convey 60,000,000 gallons in twenty-four hours.
Page 93:  The height of the interior of the Aqueduct is 8 feet 5 1/2 inches, and the greatest width is 7 feet 5 inches.  The sectional area of the interior is 53.34 square feet.

1843 The mayor, aldermen, and commonalty of the city of New York, plaintiffs in error, vs. James Bailey, sen., John Bailey and Abraham Bailey, defendants in error : case made by defendants in error. | also here |

1844 "The Croton Aqueduct," by William Beach Lawrence, from Hunt's Merchant Magazine and Commercial Review 10(5):434-441  (May, 1844)

1844 Annual Report of the Croton Aqueduct Board, June 17, 1844.

1844 Reminiscences of the City of New York and Its Vicinity

1845 An ordinance in relation to the use of the Croton Water in the City of New-York, and for other purposes.  Proposed.

1845 Annual Report of the Croton Aqueduct Board, for 1845.  July 7, 1845.
Pages 125-126:  One fact, susceptible of the fullest demonstration, needs to be mentioned: it is, that every person, who pays tax on real or personal estate, actually pays less money now, than he did previous to the introduction of the water; and this arises from the reduction of the rates of insurance. The tax to defray the interest of the Croton Water Debt is 20 cents on the 100 dollars, and the average reduction on the rates of insurance is at least 40 cents on the 100 dollars; and it is fair to presume, that with the number of fires that take place, even with so copious and abundant supply of water to quench them, with small loss and injury, the old rates, without this supply, would of necessity have largely increased. In illustration of the above, the Board mention the following: One of our most intelligent merchants and largest tax payers, who pays at this office water rent for near forty houses, relates the result of a calculation he made, viz.: He placed in one column the rate of insurance he paid on this property previous to the introduction of Croton Water; in another, the rate of insurance he pays at present, and added to it the Croton water tax, and subtracting the two last from the first, the result is a clear saving of 25 per cent. Another merchant states, that he insures on his stock 30,000 dollars; previous to the introduction of the water he paid 85 cents on the 100 dollars; he now pays for the same amount of property 35 cents on the hundred dollars, a saving of 150 dollars. If he paid the Croton water tax on the above amount it would be 60 dollars, leaving a nett gain of 90 dollars.

1846 Quarterly Report of the President of the Croton Aqueduct Board, ending January 31, 1846.

1846 Description of the New-York Croton Aqueduct: In English, German and French, by Theophilus Schramke

1848 Annual Report and Quarterly Report of the Croton Aqueduct Board, September 4, 1848.
Annual report May 1, 1847 to April 30, 1848
Quarterly report from May 1, 1848 to July 31, 1848

1848 Quarterly Report of the Croton Aqueduct Board from August 1, 1848 to October 31, 1848, November 2, 1848

1848 Report of the Committee on Croton Aqueduct Department, with draft of an act for reorganization of, December 14, 1848

1849 Quarterly Report of the Croton Aqueduct Department, from November 1, 1848 to January 31, 1849.  February 12, 1849

1849 An act to create the "Croton Aqueduct department" in the city of New-York.  April 11, 1849.
§ 18. The common council of said city may by ordinance establish a scale of annual rents for the supply of the Croton water to be called the "regular rents," and apportioned to different classes of buildings in said city in reference to their dimensions, values exposure to fires, ordinary uses for dwellings, stores, shops, private stables and other common purposes, number of families or occupants or consumption of water, as near as may be practicable and modify, alter and amend and increase such scale from time to time, and extend it to other descriptions of buildings and establishments. Such regular rents when so established, shall be collected from the owners or occupants of all such buildings respectively, which shall be situated upon lots adjoining any street or avenue in said city in which the distributing water pipes are or may be laid, and from which they can be supplied with water. Said "regular rents" shall become a charge and lien upon such houses and lots respectively as herein provided.
§ 19. Hotels, factories, stables, livery stables and other buildings, and establishments which consume extra quantities of water, may in addition to the regular rents be charged with additional rents to be called the "extra rents."
§ 20. The regular annual rents which are not paid at the Croton aqueduct department before the first day of August in each year, shall be subject to an additional charge of five per cent., and those rates not paid before the first day of November in each year, shall be subject to an additional charge of ten per cent.

1849 First Annual Report of the Croton Aqueduct Department for the year 1849, January 7, 1850.
Page 34:  The necessity for a more rigid police, and more stringent rules regulating the use of water, will be apparent, when it is stated that very nearly the whole volume of the Croton river has been delivered in the city during many weeks of the past summer, amounting to at least sixty imperial gallons [72 wine gallons] each twenty-four hours, for every inhabitant; a supply three times greater than any legitimate use of it, would demand. It is true that the quantity may be increased at will, by the construction of new reservoirs, but before incurring this expense, economy requires that an effort be made to compel the observance of existing ordinances regulating its use. This will not b« an impossible duty, if the power of this Board be not, (as now), rendered nugatory, by the too willing action of individual members of the Common Council, and other city officers, in granting permission to keep open street hydrants for the use of favored persons and neighborhoods. The operation of the new law in relation to "water rents," which goes into effect on the first day of May next, and through which every improved lot will be charged, whether the house be supplied with water or not, renders it more than ever necessary that the whole subject be left within the control of this Department, inasmuch as it is expected that thereafter much will be claimed as a right, which has hitherto been received as a favor. In the proper administration of the water police, the comfort, as well as the interests of all are directly involved.

1849 Minutes of the Croton Aqueduct Board of the City of New York: July 18, 1849, to April 9, 1870 New York Croton Aqueduct Board

1850 "A New Project," Dollar Newspaper (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania), March 6, 1850, Page 2
It is proposed in the New York Common Council, to confer insurance powers on the Croton Aqueduct Department.  It is estimated that the premiums paid for fire insurance to companies and agencies in the city, amount to about three millions of dollars annually..  The Sun of that city says, this measure, if successful, will carry with it the Croton water free to every inhabitant of the city.  The premiums to be thus received by the Croton Aqueduct Department, will be sufficient not only to pay the interest on the Croton water debt, but eventually to pay the principal.  At present the water rents do not pay one-half this interest.

1850 An Ordinance: Establishing a Scale of Water Rents for the Croton Aqueduct Department, May 1, 1850, reprinted in Ordinances of the Mayor, Aldermen and Commonalty of the City of New York revised A.D. 1859

1850 Second Annual Report of the Croton Aqueduct Department for the year 1850, December 31, 1850.
Page 48:  Under these direct and sufficiently onerous responsibilities, this Board now warns the Common Council, and through it every citizen, that the last drop of water which the works in their present state can supply is now daily delivered in the city, — a supply more than equal to any, and all the legitimate wants of a population of a million and a half!

1851 "The Croton Aqueduct:  Its Present Condition and Finances," Report of Nicholas Dean, Esq. President of the Croton Aqueduct Department, made to the Common Council of the city of New York, from Hunt's Merchant's Magazine and Commercial Review  25(6):704-715 (December, 1851)

1851 Third Annual Report of the Croton Aqueduct Department for the year 1851, December 31, 1851.

1852 "The Croton Water -- Its action on lead, &c." from Scientific American 7(22):173 (February 14, 1852)

1852 Fourth Annual Report of the Croton Aqueduct Department for the year 1852, January 3, 1853.
Pages 15-16:  It was assumed by the Commissioners that twenty-two gallons per day for each inhabitant would be a liberal allowance, at which rate a city, containing a population of two and a half millions, might be supplied by an aqueduct of the proposed dimensions.
An experience of ten years enables us to contrast these preliminary calculations with actual results, and thus to see, with great certainty, the requirements of the future.
During the summer months, for two years past, the whole flow of the Croton river has been turned through the aqueduct, and in 1851, "for many consecutive weeks, not a drop of water passed over the dam, and the lake formed by it was gradually drawn down two feet seven and a half inches." The daily delivery in the city for a large portion of these two years, has been about thirty millions of gallons a day — often in the past year at least five millions more, drawn from the reservoirs on the island—giving to each inhabitant within the water district, (not more than four hundred and fifty thousand,) a daily supply of nearly ninety gallons.
To claim that such quantity of water is necessary for any useful purpose is simply preposterous; but assuming that no reduction in the rate is to happen, it may be well to see how long before that daily supply will begin to be diminished by want of capacity in the aqueduct itself.
Pages 23-25:  No satisfactory estimate of the consumption of water at some of the manufactories and leading hotels, can be made without the intervention of a water meter. Of these, the best hitherto offered to the Department, is the invention of Samuel Huse, of Boston, ten of which are now in use in the city. To withstand the pressure, they must be made very strong, and to register accurately require to be adjusted with great precision and nicety of workmanship. They are consequently too expensive ever to come into general use for ordinary dwellings. Some of those now in operation here, costing four hundred and fifty dollars each, and ranging down to the smallest, at thirty-five dollars, exclusive of the cost of fixtures, and setting them. The expenditures for meters during the year amounts to three thousand six hundred and and fifty dollars and fourteen cents, all of which, and more, will be returned to the treasury within the first year, by the increased charges against the establishments to which they have been affixed. Such being the result, the Department considers it a duty to extend their application till all the most important consumers are brought under this satisfactory test, and to that end have inserted a moderate sum in their estimates for next year.
Meters are now in operation at the following places, and show the average daily consumption of water as set forth.

1853 Annual Report of the Board of Water Commissioner of the City of Detroit. In 1853, the new Board of Water Commissioners of the City of Detroit sent superintendent Jacob Houghton, Jr. to visit and report on water works in other cities, including New York.
Pages 23: New York - Is supplied with water from the Croton river, across which a dam forty feet in height is constructed, forming the Croton Lake, covering an area of four hundred acres, and containing, at the depth of six feet, an available supply of 500,000,000 gallons of water. From thence the water is carried, by means of a brick aqueduct, (except at the crossings of the Harlaem river bridge, and the Manhattan valley, where inverted siphons of the respective dips of twelve and one hundred and five feet are used), about thirty-eight miles in length, and having a total fall of forty-four feet, to the receiving reservoir, which covers thirty-seven acres of ground, and has a capacity of one hundred and fifty millions of gallons. From this reservoir the water is conducted through iron pipes to the distributing reservoir, from whence it is distributed in the usual manner.
This reservoir is built of stone, covers an area of four acres, and contains 21,000,000 gallons, when full to the top water line. These works are capable of supplying thirty millions of gallons per day, have cost between thirteen and fourteen millions of dollars, and supply water to more than half a million of people.
An enlargement of the works is now in contemplation, by which the quantity of water delivered daily will be materially increased.

1853 Fifth Annual Report of the Croton Aqueduct Department for the year 1853, January 2, 1854.
Page 23:  Water Meters.  As stated in the last annual report, these instruments have increased in favor, and the consumer who could not be convinced of the quantity of water used in his establishment has now a certain and impartial umpire to determine the difference in estimates between him and the Department; and though the result in almost every case is against the consumer, yet the decision of this small, but costly apparatus, is very generally acquiesced in.
The only instrument yet in use is that of Mr. Samuel Huse, of Boston, and is believed by the Department to be accurate; and, as far as can be ascertained by the action of a working model, deposited in the office for some months, known to be so. The only objection to their far more extensive use is the expense of the apparatus, and some loss in the head of water to those who require its use, at high elevations; and, it is to be hoped, that the ingenuity of some practical inventor may yet overcome these difficulties, and render their adoption more extensive. The difference in rate, made by the instruments now in use, demonstrates that they are, notwithstanding the cost, the most valuable article for this purpose yet introduced to their notice. That the difference between the former estimated amount, and the quantity fixed by actual measurement, may be understood by the reader, a few cases are subjoined, giving the amounts paid for the six months previous to, and the six months after, the attachment of the meter.

1854 "Caution to Merchants," New York Herald, July 27, 1856, Page 8.
On Friday night last, John J. Morrow, private watchman, discovered two stores in Warren street damaged considerably by the Croton water overflowing the basins.  The water will not rise to the upper floors in day time, but at night it will, and by leaving the faucets open the basins became overflowed.  In this way four stores have been overflowed in the last month.

1854 Sixth Annual Report of the Croton Aqueduct Department for the year 1854, January 3, 1855.

1855 Description of the New-York Croton Aqueduct: In English, German and French, 2nd edition, by Theophilus Schramke

1855 Seventh Annual Report of the Croton Aqueduct Department for the year 1855, January 7, 1856.
Page 13:  Meters have been placed on sixty-eight large buildings, and have operated beneficially in determining the quantity of water consumed, and the Board propose to extend the system in special cases of hotels, factories, &c., as circumstances may require, but have not yet become convinced that the exercise of a proper discretion would allow of their being introduced into private houses, because the expense for the whole city, and in proportion for a port, would amount, at present prices for meter and for putting up, to something like one million of dollars, and for their repairs and superintendence to more than two hundred thousand dollars per annum.

1856 Eighth Annual Report of the Croton Aqueduct Department for the year 1856, January 5, 1857.

1857 "Ericsson's Caloric Engine," advertisement in New-York Tribune, November 18, 1857, Page 2.
Motive engine requiring no water.  For filling cisterns of private houses in cities, a gas burner produces sufficient heat for actuaing the engine.

1857 The origin of the Croton Aqueduct in the City of New York, by James B Murray

1857 Ninth Annual Report of the Croton Aqueduct Department for the year 1857, January 5, 1858.

1858 Tenth Annual Report of the Croton Aqueduct Department for the year 1858, January 3, 1859.

1859 "Water," by Col James B. Murray, from The American Gas Light Journal 1(2):26-27 (August 1, 1859)  Reminiscences of the Common Council of 1832 and of the origin of the Croton Aqueduct, from 1857 pamphlet

1859 "Water," from The American Gas Light Journal 1(3):39 (September 1, 1859)
Something is the matter with the Croton.  Everybody complains of the musty, sickish small and taste it has acquired since the first of August.
The Croton Aqueduct Department have it in serious contemplation, we understand, to introduce hydrometers into the houses of their customers, to put a stop to the enormous waste of water that is now going on.

1859 "Bursting of the the Croton Water Main," from The American Gas Light Journal 1(5):80 (November 1, 1859)  On Friday, October 12, 1859.

1859 "The Croton Water Analysis," from The American Gas Light Journal 1(5):86-87 (November 1, 1859)

1859 John P. Treadwell and others vs. Myndert Van Shaick and others, 30 Barb. 444, November 13, 1859, Supreme Court of the State of New York
The Croton aqueduct board has full power under the statutes, and the ordinances of the common council, to make special charges, or fix extra rates, to be paid for the use of the water, varying in each case, according to the quantity used; and to regulate the terms on which extra allowances shall be made, and the conditions on which the water shall be used.
The board has a right to make every such arrangement, respecting an extra supply of water, a matter of agreement, subject to such terms and conditions as it shall deem necessary to impose.
The proper construction of the 27th section of the act of 1849, establishing the board, is that the legislature intended the water should not be furnished to those who would not pay for it; and that the power should exist, in the board, to withhold the supply, if the terms on which the supply was furnished were not complied with.
The board therefore has power to cut off the supply of water, for non-payment of the water-rate; whether it be the regular rents, apportioned by the size, character and use of the building, or the extra rents chargeable, in addition to the regular rents, upon buildings which consume an extra quantity of water.

1859 "Waste of Croton Water," by Thomas B. Tappan, November 12, 1859, Commissioner, Croton Aqueduct Department from The American Gas Light Journal 1(6):98 (December 1, 1859)

1859 "Waste of Croton Water," from The American Gas Light Journal 1(6):107 (December 1, 1859)

1859 Sketch of the Civil Engineering of North America, by David Stevenson
Page 200-203:  Croton Water Works

1859 Eleventh Annual Report of the Croton Aqueduct Department for the year 1859, January 3, 1860.
Page 20:  St. Nicholas Hotel.  The protracted suit which was commenced in the latter part of 1855, by an injunction procured by the proprietors of this immense establishment, to prevent the water being shut off for non-payment, for their extraordinary consumption, was this month argued in the Supreme Court, on appeal from the decision of the Court below, and again decided in favor of the city. The arguments of the Court established the principles contained in the sections of the law of 1849, which relate to this matter, and assign the reasons on the strength of which they were drawn. They constitute a perfect justification of the proceedings of the Board, in relation to the application to buildings, of wa termeters, and of the price which was charged for the water, according to ordinance.

1860 "The Croton," The New York Times, January 4, 1860, Page 11,
The powers of this Board are very extensive. It has charge of the Croton aqueduct, reservoirs, works and property connected with the supply and distribution of water in the city; of the construction, repair and cleaning of the sewers; of paving, repaving and repairing streets; or digging and constructing wells and the collection of revenue arising from the sale of Croton water. These duties comprehend great public interests, and affect the health and comfort of the citizen to an incalculable extent, and yet the Mayor is clothed with no power to supervise, much less direct them.
The Croton Board, constituted by a President, a Commissioner and an Engineer, compose a managing triumvirate, who are in no way amenable to any chief executive. Though those officers in the first instance derive their authority by appointment from the Mayor and Board of Aldermen, yet the tenure of office being for five years, without any provision for removal, however great the necessity, they are totally independent of the creative power. The large sums expended by this Board and the subordinates appointed by it are matters over which the Mayor has no control. It is conducted comparatively upon the same close corporation principles the Almshouse Department.
Many of its present duties having been conferred upon it by the charter of 1857, it is impossible to give a fair statement of the amount of the appropriations for it during the past ten years, nor is it possible to say with what economy it is now being administered.

1860 "Water Supply in the City of New York," from The American Gas Light Journal 1(7):137-138 (January 1, 1860) Continuation of August 1, 1859 article on the history of New York's water supply.

1860 "Temperature of Croton Water," from The American Gas Light Journal 1(10):209 (April 2, 1860)

1860 "Croton Aqueduct Department," The American Gas-Light Journal 1(10):210-211 (April 2, 1860).  Underground vaults and water supply to Sing-Sing prison.

1860 Answer of A. W. Craven, chief Engineer Croton Aqueduct, to charges made by Fernando Wood, Mayor. New York, July 31, 1860, by Alfred Wingate Craven

1860 Report of the Special Committee of the Board of Aldermen appointed to investigate the sufficiency of the charges by his honor the mayor for the removal of Messrs. Craven and Tappen, of the Croton Aqueduct Department.  October 6, 1860.

1860 "Cheap Water," The New York Times, October 9, 1860, Page 4. | Also here |
The only reasonable method of preventing waste, is to charge each house with the water that goes into that house, and the only possible method of ascertaining this quantity is to measure it, or rather, let it measure itself, like gas, by passing through a meter.

1860 "The Croton Aqueduct," by T. Addison Richards, from Harper's New Monthly Magazine 22:18-30 (December, 1860)

1860 Twelfth Annual Report of the Croton Aqueduct Department for the year 1860, January 7, 1861.

1861 "Annual Report of the Croton Aqueduct Department," The New York Times, March 2, 1861, Page 8.

1861 "The Croton Aqueduct Department," New York World, March 4, 1861, Page 6.

1861 An act to supply Sing Sing prison with Croton water, and for the sale of certain lands of the state.  April 17, 1861.

1861 "Water-Works of Philadelphia and New York," American Gas-Light Journal 2:347 (May 15, 1861).

1861 "New Contract for Croton Water Mains," American Gas-Light Journal 2:351 (May 15, 1861).  Messrs. Colwell & Co. of Philadelphia for 4,200 feet of five-foot pipes.

1861 "Break in the Croton Mains," American Gas-Light Journal 2:362 (June 1, 1861).  May 18th on Fifth avenue, not far from where the great break occurred in December of last year.

1861 "Still Another Break in the Croton Main," American Gas-Light Journal 2:369 (June 1, 1861).  May 23d in Worth street, near Church.

1861 Thirteenth Annual Report of the Croton Aqueduct Department for the year 1861 , January 6, 1862.

1862 Fourteenth Annual Report of the Croton Aqueduct Department for the year 1862 , January 5, 1863.

1863 Fifteenth Annual Report of the Croton Aqueduct Department for the year 1863 , January 4, 1864.

1864 Sixteenth Annual Report of the Croton Aqueduct Department for the year 1864 , January 6, 1865.

1865 "The Croton Aqueduct Board Judgment for the Old Commissioners," The New York Times, July 1, 1865, Page 8. | Also here |

1865 "Hanson's Self-Acting Pressure Pump," advertisement from Commercial Advertiser (New York, New York), December 2, 1865), Page 2.

1865 Colton Map of New York City.  Shows receiving reservoirs in Central Park and Murray Hill distributing reservoir

1865 Seventeenth Annual Report of the Croton Aqueduct Department for the year 1865, January 1, 1866.

1866 Eighteenth Annual Report of the Croton Aqueduct Department for the year 1866, January 8, 1867.

1867 "More Water Needed," Evening Post (New York, New York), July 27, 1867, Page 2.
At present cabinets and bath-tubs on the third floor all over town, and those on the second floor in some parts of the city, are not only useless, but worse than useless, as with the present deficient supply of water they cannot be kept sweet and clean, even when not used.  In some situations the water flows into them for an hour or two soon after midnight, filling the reservoir of the water-closets - but this is an inadequate supply for an entire day's use.

1867 Nineteenth Annual Report of the Croton Aqueduct Department for the year 1867, January 6, 1868.

1868 Twentieth Annual Report of the Croton Aqueduct Department for the year 1868, January 4, 1869.

1869 Twenty-First Annual Report of the Croton Aqueduct Department for the year 1869, January 3, 1870.

1870 "Croton Poisons," New York Daily Herald, April 11, 1870, Page 7.  Dangers of lead cisterns and pipes.

1870 An act in relation to the Croton Aqueduct of the city of New York.  April 15, 1870.

1870 An act to make further provision for the government of the city of New York.  April 26, 1870.
§ 13. The commissioner of public works is hereby authorized in his discretion to cause water meters of approved pattern and suitable for the purpose, to be designated by said commissioner, to be placed in all stores, workshops, hotels, manufactories, public edifices, at wharves, ferry-houses, stables, and in all the places in which water is furnished for business consumption by the department of public works, so that all water so furnished therein or thereat may be measured and known by the said department, and for the purpose of ascertaining the ratable proportion which consumers of water should pay for the water therein or thereat received and used. Thereafter, as shall be determined by the Commissioner of public works, the said department shall make out all bills and charges for water furnished by them to each and every consumer as aforesaid, to whose consumption a meter as aforesaid is affixed, in ratable proportion to the water consumed, as ascertained by the meter on his or her premises or places occupied or used as aforesaid. All expenses of meters, their connections and setting, water rates, and other lawful charges for the supply of Croton water shall be a lien upon the premises where water is supplied as now provided by law. Nothing herein contained shall be construed so as to remit or prevent the due collection of arrearages or charges for water consumption heretofore incurred, nor interfere with the proper liens therefor, nor of charges, or rates, or liens hereafter to be incurred for water consumption, in any dwelling-house, building or place which may not contain one of the meters aforesaid.

1870 "Water Meters - Their Usefullness and Danger," The New York Times, May 1, 1870, Page 3 | part 2 |

1870 The New York Herald, July 13, 1870, Page 12.
The Water Supply.  July 12, 1870. You are hereby notified that within the city limits no connection will be allowed with the Croton water pipes of any water ram, Hansom pump, or any other machine or machinery, by which the Croton water is to be used as a motive power, without first having a permit from me to make such connection.
You are also notified not to place tanks anywhere, into which the Croton water will run by its head, or be pumped or forced into by machinery driven by Croton water, with an overflow pipe, without a permit as above noted.  William W. Tweed, Commissioner of Public Works.

1870 "Croton Water," advertisement from The New York Times, July 20, 1870, Page 6.
Raised to the upper floors without waste and without cost.  No objections by the Croton Board, successfully used in this City, ad indorsed by Architects and Property-Owners.  Continental Windmill Co., No. 5 College-place, N.Y.

1870 Real Estate Record and Builders' Guide 5(123):16 (July 23, 1870)
Page 16:  Hanson's Self-Acting Pumps.  These pumps are allowed to be used by the Croton Board.

1870 "Notice to Manufacturers and Inventors of Water Meters," The Sun (New York, New York), August 8, 1870, Page 4.
The Department of Public Works, City of New York, will on and after the 20th of August next, be prepared to examine and test the capacity and accuracy of any water meter that may be presented to it for that purpose.
William M. Tweed, Commissioner of Public Works.

1870 "Water Meters," The New York Herald, November 2, 1870, Page 12.

1871 An act to extend the distribution of Croton water through the city of New York, and to lay the necessary mains to deliver it at higher elevation; and also to provide for the expense of water meters.  March 29, 1871.

1871 First annual report of the Department of Public Works of the City of New York for the year 1870-71, April 11, 1871

1872 "The Water-Meter Job," The New York Times, February 10, 1872, Page 4. | also here |
Mr. Navarro's Claim for $283,500 - A protest that is to be laid before the Board of Audit Today - How Water-Meters were tested by the ring.

1872 Second annual report of the Department of Public Works of the City of New York for the year ending April 10, 1872
Pages 11-13: Except where water-meters are employed, the amount of water-rent charged to consumers is based upon estimates of the quantities consumed. There are at present in use upwards of two hundred water-meters of the Worthington patent, which is now substantially the same as when first patented some ten years ago. The establishment and application of means to ascertain correctly the quantities of water consumed is a subject of great importance to the city, as thereby the revenue from water-rents would be greatly increased, and any excessive use of Croton water would readily be detected and prevented. Under the direction of my predecessor in office some forty different inventions and patents in water-meters were examined and tested. The following is a copy of the report of the Chief Engineer of the Croton Aqueduct upon the subject :
To Hon. William M. Tweed, Commissioner of Public Works :  Sir — I have, under your instructions, erected suitable fixtures for testing water-meters, and examined and tried forty-eight (48).
In the examination, the qualities sought for were accuracy of measurement, strength, and durability, with simplicity, cheapness of construction, and which afford but little impediment to the flow of water.
A great amount of mechanical capacity and skill has been shown in the construction of the meters presented for trial, many of them being beautiful specimens of works of art, and fulfilling most of the requirements.
The meter presented for trial by Mr. J. F. De Navarro, called the vibrating single-piston meter, is a very compact machine, simple in its construction and easily repaired or adjusted. It takes but a small force to run it, measures the water with great accuracy, and, in my opinion, answers the requirements more nearly than any other meter presented for trial.
Respectfully yours, EDW. H. TRACY,  Chief Engineer Croton Aqueduct.
On the 23d of August, 1871, the Department entered into contract with J.F. De Navarro for 10,000 water-meters, at $70 each.  Of this number 4,050 have been delivered, one estimate on account of the contract being in the Comptroller's office awaiting payment.  On another estimate, now in this office, the approval of this Department has been withheld, in order that the legality of said contract could be ascertained and determined.

1872 The People of the State of New York ex rel. Jose F. Navarro, Appellant, against George M. Van Nort, Commissioner of Public Works of the City of New York, Respondent, Papers on Appeal from Order, New York Supreme Court, City and County of New York.

1873 Third annual report of the department of public works of the city of New York : for the year ending April 10, 1873.
Pages 20-21:  As stated in the last annual report, this Department refused to approve the bills for, or receive meters furnished by J. F. Navarro under a contract made previous to my administration, whereupon Mr. Navarro commenced legal proceedings to compel the Department to draw its requisition upon the Comptroller for payment of $285,000, with interest, for 4,050 meters delivered under that contract; the decision of the Supreme Court in Chambers was in favor of the Department, but in January last, upon an appeal by Mr. Navarro, the Supreme Court in General Term reversed this decision, and issued a writ of peremptory mandamus, commanding me, as Commissioner of Public Works, to draw a requisition upon the Comptroller for the full amount claimed, with interest. Upon the opinion and advice of the Counsel to the Corporation, no further resistance could be made by this Department, but the Finance Department is now contesting the validity of the claim, in a suit brought by Mr. Navarro against the Mayor, Aldermen, and Commonalty.

1873 New York World, May 30, 1873, Page 4.
The bill incorporating "The Salt-water Supply Company of the City of New York" is now depending on the Legislature.

1873 "Supplying New York with Water from Poughkeepsie," The Evening Gazette (Port Jervis, New York), July 31, 1873, Page 2.

1875 "American Institute Fair," The Manufacturer and Builder 7(11):248 (November, 1875)
Thomas Hanson, of Brooklyn, exhibits a noiseless water-pressure pumping-engine, which uses the force of the water drawn in the lower portion of the house to force water into a tank to supply the upper part.  This avoids wasting water for the purpose of driving the pump, as is often the case with hydraulic motors.

1876 "Utilization of Salt Water," The New York Times, March 4, 1876, Page 8.

1876 "Utilizing Salt Water," New York Daily Herald, March 4, 1876, Page 8.

1876 "No Salt Water," New York Herald, April 8, 1876, Page 11.

1877 "Croton Water," from Scribner's Monthly, 14(2):161-176 (June, 1877)

1878 Report of the Special Committee of the Board of Aldermen Appointed to Investigate the "ring" Frauds, Together with the Testimony Elicited During the Investigation: Board of Aldermen, January 4, 1878
Pages 180-183:  Tweed's testimony on the Navarro water meter

1879 Report of the Department of Public Works of the City of New York for the Quarter ending March 31, 1879

1879 Report of the Department of Public Works of the City of New York, for the quarter ending June 30, 1879, with special report on the subject of Water Supply.
Pages 14-15:  There is, however, another defect in the aqueduct itself. This perhaps cannot be called a defect in the original design when it is considered that it was not contemplated that the water line of the aqueduct would rise above the springing of the arch, so that at most the depth of water would not exceed five feet. It was computed that this volume would furnish sixty millions of gallons daily, and provision was probably not made for delivering a greater quantity. The upper part of the aqueduct, its arch, spandrels and sustaining walls, were therefore not constructed with a view to the pressure of water raised nearly to the roof. It is now eight or nine years since it was found necessary to carry water in the aqueduct far above the springing line. It is evident this must have been the case to meet the demand of ninety to one hundred millions of gallons daily. This increased pressure, added to the settlement of the lower walls, caused cracks in the arch, from which water leaked, and, finding its way through the dry walls to the ground, caused a still greater settlement of the embankment. Steps should have been immediately taken at that time (if not earlier) to strengthen and repair the upper portion of the aqueduct, in the manner pursued for the past three years. Had this been done we would have been saved from great anxiety, and from what might have resulted in a serious calamity.

1879 New-York Tribune, August 12, 1879, Page 4
The Commissioners of Public Works has found it necessary, in view of the growing demand upon the water supply, to require all persons using water for business purposes to use a metre by which the amount they must pay the city can be gauged.  This, it is believed, will be useful, not so much in gaining a revenue for the city as in checking waste.  It is noted as one incident in the increased drain on the supply, that the elevated roads use half a million gallons of water a day.

1879 "The Use of Water Meters," New-York Tribune, August 12, 1879, Page 8.
A new order in reference to the Worthington metre - The Navarro suit.
Between 500 and 600 now being sued.

1879 Report of the Department of Public Works of the City of New York for the Quarter ending December 31, 1879

1879 The inadequate water supply in New York, and its remedies : the Holly system of direct pressure on all mains and pipes ; water to be supplied at all times at the top of each building on Manhattan Island by the Holly system ; triple method as a whole or separately, by J.L. Douglass.

1880 Report of the Department of Public Works of the City of New York for the Quarter ending March 31, 1880

1880 Report of the Department of Public Works of the City of New York for the Quarter ending June 30, 1880

1880 Report of the Department of Public Works of the City of New York for the Quarter ending September 30, 1880

1880 Report of the Department of Public Works of the City of New York for the Quarter ending December 31, 1880

1880 Remonstrance Against the Removal of the Murray Hill Reservoir: Including a Petition for the Bill Introduced Into the Assembly by Mr. Mitchell to Authorize a Commission to Consider the Whole Question of Water Supply and Distribution

1881 New York City, Engineering News, 8:91 (March 5, 1881)

1881 Report of the Department of Public Works of the City of New York for the Quarter ending March 31, 1881

1881 New York Water Supply, April 11, 1881. Report to Hubert O. Thompson, Commissioner of Public Works, by Isaac Newton, Chief Engineer, opinion of E.S. Chesbrough, Consulting Engineer.
Page 5:  The utmost capacity of the aqueduct has been variously stated, in different reports, at 90 million to 115 million gallons daily.  At one time when the flow was estimated was forced to upwards of 103 million, the consequences were disastrous, for this rate caused serious damage to the aqueduct, and it was therefore reduced.
Page 6:  The distinguished constructor of the aqueduct did not anticipate the great increase in the demand for water brought about by the requirements of modern life, the enormous growth of manufactures in the city, the use already probably between seven and eight thousand steam boilers within the cit limits, the steam railways in operation already consuming over one million of gallons daily, nor the provision in every house of water fittings, – often including pumps, – from the basement to upper floors.

1881 Remonstrance of the Union League Club Against the Bill for the Construction by the Commissioner of Public Works of a New Aqueduct from the Croton Valley to the City: With Reasons in Favor of the Appointment by the Governor and Senate of Five Commissioners to Consider the Subject and Report at the Next Session, and with Authority, If Need Be, to Construct Such Aqueduct in Place of the Commissioner of Public Works, April 14, 1881.

1881 Report of the Department of Public Works of the City of New York for the Quarter ending June 30, 1881

1881 Report of the Department of Public Works of the City of New York for the Quarter ending September 30, 1881

1881 “How Croton Water is Wasted.” Engineering News 8:450-451 (November 5, 1881)
How Croton Water is Wasted. “The inspectors of the Department of Public Works are busy searching for houses where water is wasted. Their method is to have a man enter a sewer in the night-time through a man-hole and apply a gauge to the water flowing into the sewers from houses. In cases where the flow is great an inspector is sent to the house the next day to examine the plumbing. When a serious leak is found the water is cut off summarily. In this way a number of houses have been deprived of water within the last few days. The police have been notified to be especially vigilant to prevent the waste or water, and the result of the order has been that several houses have been reported. In one case yesterday the water was cut off from a row of three houses on a police report. The water will not be let on again until the owners or occupants take measures to prevent waste. The officials of the Department of Public Works find the most fault with apartment houses. One of them visited by inspectors had a tank on the top floor containing 3,300 gallons of water. This was filled and emptied twice a day, making the water supply 6,600 gallons a day. Ten families live in the house, so that 660 gallons are used by each family, which is considered an excessive amount. This does not include hot water, which is supplied from boilers in the basement. The officials have no power to limit the supply unless a waste of water can be shown. Some trouble is experienced by the inspectors in gaining admittance to houses in the daytime, as servants object to letting them in while their employers are out.”

1881 Report of the Department of Public Works of the City of New York for the Quarter ending December 31, 1881

1882 New York Water Supply, January 20, 1882. Report of Isaac Newton, Chief Engineer of Croton Aqueduct. | Also here |

1882 Report of H.O. Thompson ...: On Proposed New Aqueduct and Storage Reservoir for Additional Supply from Croton River, with Detailed Report of Isaac Newton ... and Opinions of Consulting Engineers, Feb. 1882

1882 Report of the Department of Public Works of the City of New York for the Quarter ending March 31, 1882

1882 A report of a plan for supplementing the Croton water supply to the City of New York from the Ramapo District, by William J. McAlpine.  April 30, 1882.

1882 Report of the Department of Public Works of the City of New York for the Quarter ending June 30, 1882

1882 "New York Water Rates," Engineering News 9:182 (June 3, 1882)

1882 Report and Resolutions on the Subject of City Water Supply and Distribution: Showing the Danger of the Proposed Dam at Quaker Bridge, and Renewing the Petition to Appoint Commissioners to Decide Upon Plans and Construct Works. April, 1882 Union League Club (New York, N.Y.)

1882 New York City from "The Water-Supply of Certain Cities and Towns of the United States," by Walter G. Elliot, C. E., Ph. D.

1882 Report of the Department of Public Works of the City of New York for the Quarter ending December 31, 1882

1883 "Water Supply of New York City," The Medical Record 23(3):70 (January 20, 1883)

1883 New York Water Supply, February 21, 1883. Report on Storage Reservoirs in the Croton, by Isaac Newton, Chief Engineer Croton Aqueduct.  Opinion of Consulting Engineers.

1883 Report of the Commissioner of Public Works to the Aqueduct Commissioners: Supplementary to His Report of August 8, 1883, Upon Plans for an Additional Supply of Water to the City of New York; and Relating to the Building of the Proposed Muscoot Dam, September 11, 1883.

1883 "The Great Water-Meter Job," Engineering News, 10:532 (November 3, 1883)

1883 John Biard, Plaintiff, Respondent, vs. The Mayor, Aldermen and Commonalty of the City of New York, Defendants, Appellants, Case on Appeal, Record and Briefs, New York Supreme Court.| another copy or version |

1883 John Biard, Plaintiff, Respondent, vs. The Mayor, Aldermen and Commonalty of the City of New York, October 26, 1883, Supreme Court of New York, First Department

1884 Report of the Commissioner of Public Works to the Aqueduct Commissioners: Supplementary to His Report of August 8, 1883, Upon Plans for an Additional Supply of Water to the City of New York; and Relating to the Plans, Specifications, and Estimates for the Construction of the Proposed Quaker Bridge Dam, January 30, 1884.

1884 Report of the Department of Public Works of the City of New York for the Quarter ending March 31, 1884

1884 Report of the Department of Public Works of the City of New York for the Quarter ending June 30, 1884

1884 Report of the Department of Public Works of the City of New York for the Quarter ending September 30, 1884

1884 John Biard, Plaintiff, Respondent, vs. The Mayor, Aldermen and Commonalty of the City of New York, Defendants, Appallents, 96 N.Y. 567, October 7, 1884, New York Court of Appeals.

1884 "The Navarro Meter," Engineering News, 12:176 (October 11, 1884)

1884 Report of the Department of Public Works of the City of New York for the Quarter ending December 31, 1884
Pages 14-15:  By a decision or judgment of the Court of Appeals, the city has become the owner of 10,000 "Navarro" water-meters, ordered by the Department under the administration of Commissioner William M. Tweed, but rejected by his successors on the ground that the price agreed to be paid for them was exorbitant; 4,050 of them have been tested and regulated to measure the water passing through them accurately, but all these meters have been stored for so long a time (about fourteen years) that they will require certain necessary repairs before they can be used. It is suggested by the Chief Engineer of the Croton Aqueduct that these meters be placed on houses used exclusively as dwellings, where under the law, meters cannot be placed at the expense of the owners, and where waste of water is known or believed to exist; and he thinks that the cost of the meters, putting them.in order and setting them would be returned to the city in one year by increased revenue for water measured by them.

1885 Report of the Department of Public Works of the City of New York for the Quarter ending September 30, 1885

1885 Engineering Drawings and Data: The New Croton Aqueduct by Engineering News Publishing Company

1886 Specifications to Contractors for Building ... the New Croton Aqueduct, Volume 2

1886 Water shed of the Croton River

1887 Establishing a scale of water rents and rules governing the use of water, for New York City.

1887 Report to the Aqueduct Commissioners by the President January 1, 1887.

1887 Departmental Estimates for Budget for the year 1888
Page 80:  3d. $17,500 for repairing 1,000 Navarro water-meters and placing them at the expense of the City in buildings known as “flats," and other houses, which, under the existing law, are not subject to the compulsory use of meters at the expense of the owners, but in which there are large opportunities for excessive consumption and waste of water, and where unnecessary waste of water is known or believed to exist. This is necessary as one of the most efficient measures to suppress excessive use and waste of water, and it is the best use which the City can make of the 10,000 Navarro water-meters for which it has been compelled to pay by judgment of the courts.

1888 Report of the Department of Public Works of the City of New York for the Quarter ending March 31, 1888

1881 The City Record: Official Journal, Volume 9, Part 2 (April 11, 1881)
Page 583:  Waste of water and Future supply.
During the year 2,604 water meters were placed, and on the first of January 4,002 meters were in use.
The designers and constructors of the aqueduct and Croton water system did not contemplate the necessity or demand that water be delivered by its own pressure in the upper stories of tall buildings. As late as 1867 the Commissioners of the Croton Aqueduct, in their annual report to the Common Council, say on this subject: “We are satisfied that the great object in the construction of the Croton works was obtained when abundant water was brought to every door, and its convenient delivery assured. Its moderate consumption and comparatively limited distribution during the early years of the operation of the works drew lightly upon the capacity of the pipes, and, of course, the temporary convenience of higher head was naturally felt ; this has, unfortunately, led to unreasonable expectations on the part of the first consumers, and now that the city has greatly increased in area and population, with consequent increased demands upon the water service, they are inclined to consider that an unjust deprivation, which, after all, but moderates an excessive privilege.”

1888 Report of the Department of Public Works of the City of New York for the Quarter ending June 30, 1888

1888 Report of the Department of Public Works of the City of New York for the Quarter ending September 30, 1888

1888 Report of the Department of Public Works of the City of New York for the Quarter and year ending December 31, 1888

1888 Outline of Plans (with Illustrations) for Furnishing an Abundant Supply of Water to the City of New York: From a Source Independent of the Croton Watershed Delivered Into the Lower Part of the City Under Pressure Sufficient for Domestic, Sanitary, Commercial and Manufacturing Purposes, and for the Extinguishment of Fires, with Legal and Engineering and Other Papers, by John R. Bartlett

1888 "New York City," from Manual of American Water Works, Volume 1.

1889 "The New Croton Aqueduct," illustrated; by Charles Barnard, from The Century Illustrated Monthly Magazine 39(2):205-224  (December, 1889)

1889 "The New Aqueduct - The Sodom Dam," illustrated, from Harper's Weekly 33:994-999 (December 14, 1889)

1890 Report of the Department of Public Works of the City of New York for the Quarter ending March 31, 1890

1890 Report of the Department of Public Works of the City of New York for the Quarter ending June 30, 1890

1890 Report of the Department of Public Works of the City of New York for the Quarter ending September 30, 1890

1890 Report of the Department of Public Works of the City of New York for the Quarter and Year ending December 31, 1890

1890 "New York City," from Manual of American Water Works, Volume 2.

1891 The Iron Age 47(2):712 (April 9, 1891)
It is said that Navarro's 10,000 water meters purchased under the Tweed regime, and which cost the city over $1,000,000, will soon be advertised for sale from the corporation yard as old junk.

1891 "New York City," from Manual of American Water Works, Volume 3.

1892 Report of the Department of Public Works of the City of New York for the Quarter ending March 31, 1892

1892 Report of the Department of Public Works of the City of New York for the Quarter ending June 30, 1892

1892 Report of the Department of Public Works of the City of New York for the Quarter ending September 30, 1892

1892 Report of the Department of Public Works of the City of New York for the Quarter and Year ending December 31, 1892

1893 Report of the Department of Public Works of the City of New York for the Quarter ending March 31, 1893

1893 Report of the Department of Public Works of the City of New York for the Quarter ending June 30, 1893

1893 Report of the Department of Public Works of the City of New York for the Quarter ending September 30, 1893

1893 Report of the Department of Public Works of the City of New York for the Quarter and Year ending December 31, 1893

1893 Catalogue of the Illustrations of the Water-supply of the City of New York: Written for the Board of General Managers of the Exhibit of the State of New York at the World's Columbian Exposition by Edward Wegmann

1894 Report of the Department of Public Works of the City of New York for the Quarter ending March 31, 1894.

1894 Report of the Department of Public Works of the City of New York for the Quarter ending June 30, 1894.

1894 Report of the Department of Public Works of the City of New York for the Quarter ending September 30, 1894.

1894 Report of the Department of Public Works of the City of New York for the Quarter and Year ending December 31, 1894.

1895 Report of the Department of Public Works of the City of New York for the Quarter ending March 31, 1895

1895 Report of the Department of Public Works of the City of New York for the Quarter ending June 30, 1895

1895 Report of the Department of Public Works of the City of New York for the Quarter ending September 30, 1895

1895 Report of the Department of Public Works of the City of New York for the Quarter and Year ending December 31, 1895

1896 The Water Supply of the City of New York, 1658-1895  by Edward Wegmann, extensive detail on the Croton System.

1897 "New York City," from Manual of American Water Works, Volume 4.

1898 First Annual Report of the Department of Water Supply of the City of New York

1899 Annual Report of the Department of Water Supply of the City of New York, | Volumes 1-68 |

1899 Second Annual Report of the Department of Water Supply of the City of New York

1900 Report Upon New York's Water Supply: With Particular Reference to the Need of Procuring Additional Sources and Their Probable Cost, with Works Constructed Under Municipal Ownership, Made to Bird S. Coler, Comptroller, March 23, 1900, by John Ripley Freeman.

1900 "An ordinance establishing a scale of water rents for The City of New York," April 10, 1900, from General Ordinances of the City of New York Under the Greater New York Charter

1900 Inquiry Into the Conditions Relating to the Water-supply of the City of New York, by Commerce and Industry Association of New York, August, 1900

1900 Third Annual Report of the Department of Water Supply of the City of New York
Pages 102-103:  Table showing yearly revenue from Croton water from October 5, 1842 to January 1, 1901

1901 "New York Water Works," Fire and Water 29:197-203 (June 15, 1901)
The Croton Dam and Watershed.  Jerome Park Reservoir.  The Distribution System of Manhattan, with views of the principal works of interest.

1903 Report of the Commission on Additional Water Supply for the City of New York: Made to Robert Grier Monroe, Commissioner of Water Supply, Gas and Electricity ... November 30, 1903

1904 Sixty-six Years Business Record For Family Reference, by José F. de Navarro
Pages 37-: Fourth Business Enterprise.  Ingersoll Rock Drill Company.
This Company grew out of my machine factory in Second Avenue, where I manufactured the ten thousand water meters for the City of New York, under contract with the Department of Public Works under W. M. Tweed. They were built under the sanction and advice of Comptroller Andrew H. Green, who afterwards turned around and opposed its payment for personal selfish political reasons, keeping up a costly litigation for ten years, which cost the city about $700,000 additional for 7 per cent. interest, costs, and other incidental expenses. The Court of Appeals in their decision went so far out of the ordinary as to clear me of any impropriety in the matter, and my original bill of $700,000 (which swelled to over $1,400,000 when interest, costs and expenses were included) was paid me in full under the administration of Mayor W. R. Grace.
I made up my mind then never again to deal with any political corporations. With the experience acquired in manufacturing the water meters and the tools and utensils on hand, Sergent and Collingworth, my two late capable, honest foremen, and myself, formed a company for jobbing purposes in the machinery line. Then, with the profits in that business, we succeeded in picking up the whole of the capital stock of the Ingersoll Rock Drill Company, a broken-down concern. After perfecting their defective machines, we made an immense success. 

1905 Report of the Board of Water Supply of the City of New York to the Board of Estimate and Apportionment: October 9, 1905 by New York Board of Water Supply

1905 Report on Filtration of the Water Supply of the City of New York by Thomas Darlington, M.D., Commissioner of Health

1906 Report of Board of Water Supply to Hon. George B. McClellan, Mayor, Showing Work Done in Preliminary Proceedings for Securing an Additional Supply of Pure and Wholesome Water from the Catskill Mountain Region, April 9, 1906

1906 Waste of water in New York and its reduction by meters and inspection.  A report by James H. Fuertes, C.E., to the Committee on Water-Supply of the Merchants' Association of New York; also A Digest of Laws Governing the Use of Water-Meters in New York, by Alfred L. Marilley; and A Summary of Present Conditions Relating to the Water-Supply of New York, by J. Hampden Dougherty (June, 1906)

1906 Annual report of the Department of Water Supply, Gas and Electricity of the City of New York

1906 First Annual Report of the Board of Water Supply of the City of New York

1907 Report to the Aqueduct Commissioners

1907 City of New York Additional Water Supply Catskill Aqueduct Inauguration of Construction near Peekskill, N.Y. June 20, 1907 by Board of Water Supply

1907 Second Annual Report of the Board of Water Supply of the City of New York

1908 Third Annual Report of the Board of Water Supply of the City of New York

1909 "The World's Greatest Aqueduct," by Alfred Douglass Flinn, The Century Illustrated Monthly Magazine 78(5):707-721 (September 1909)

1909 "High-Pressure Fire-Service Pumps of New York City," by Prof. R.C. Carpenter, from Journal of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers 31(7):839-864 (November, 1909) | Discussion 32(3):391-408 (March, 1910)

1909 "High Pressure Fire-Service Pumps of New York City," by Prof. R.C. Carpenter, from Power and the Engineer 31:760-761 (November 2, 1909)

1909 The distribution in New York of the Catskill water supply; special report by Lindon Bates, jr., consulting engineer, to the Board of Estimate and Apportionment, December 10th, 1909, by Lindon Bates, Jr.

1909 Fourth Annual Report of the Board of Water Supply of the City of New York

1910 "The Construction of the New Croton Dam," by Edward Wegmann and J.B. Goldsborough, The Journal of the American Society of Engineering Contractors 2(9):384-444 (November, 1910)

1910 Fifth Annual Report of the Board of Water Supply of the City of New York

1911 Sixth Annual Report of the Board of Water Supply of the City of New York

1912 Catskill Water Supply: Reports, Letters, Resolutions and Authorizations on the City Tunnel and the Delivery of Catskill Water to the Several Boroughs of the City

1912 Seventh Annual Report of the Board of Water Supply of the City of New York

1913 The Catskill water supply of New York City: history, location, sub-surface investigations and construction by Lazarus White

1913 Eighth Annual Report of the Board of Water Supply of the City of New York

1914 "The Croton water supply : its quality and purification," by George W. Fuller, from Journal of the American Water Works Association 1(1):135-187 (March, 1914) | also here |
Page 137:  The water is led to the city through two masonry aqueducts; the first, the old Croton aqueduct, a cut and cover brick horseshoe section, with an area of 53.34 square feet; the second, the new Croton aqueduct, a grade tunnel of horseshoe section, with an area of 155.6 square feet.

1914 Report on the Desirability of Converting the Croton Water System from a Gravity to a Pumped Supply to the Committee on Fire Prevention and Insurance of the Merchants' Association of New York, by James Hillhouse Fuertes

1914 Ninth Annual Report of the Board of Water Supply of the City of New York

1915 "Manhattan Requires Increased Water Pressure," Greater New York: Bulletin of the Merchants' Association of New York 4(2):6-8 (January 11, 1915)

1915 Ramapo Water Company, Appt., v. City of New York and Charles Strauss, Charles N. Chadwick, and John F. Galvin, Individually and as Members of the Board of Water Supply of the City of New York, 236 U.S. 579, March 8, 1915, United States Supreme Court

1915 Tenth Annual Report of the Board of Water Supply of the City of New York

1916 Catskill water supply: A general description by New York Board of Water Supply

1916 Eleventh Annual Report of the Board of Water Supply of the City of New York

1917 The Regulation of Private Water Companies in New York City, by Delos Franklin Wilcox, Reprinted from the Journal of the New England Water Works Association 31(4):550-574 (December, 1917)

1917 "Water Works History" from Twenty Second Annual Report of the American Scenic and Historic Preservation Society

1917 Exhibition illustrating the history of the water supply of the city of New York from 1639 to 1917, by Victor Hugo Paltsits

1917 A Brief Sketch of the Municipal Water Supply System of the City of New York by New York Department of Water Supply, Gas and Electricity

1917 The Catskill Aqueduct and Earlier Water Supplies of the City of New York: With Elementary Chapters on the Source and Uses of Water and the Building of Aqueducts, and an Outline for an Allegorical Pageant by New York Mayor's Catskill Aqueduct Celebration Committee and Edward Hageman Hall

1917 "Catskill Aqueduct Celebration," from Twenty Second Annual Report of the American Scenic and Historic Preservation Society, May 3, 1917

1917 "Water Works History" from Twenty Second Annual Report of the American Scenic and Historic Preservation Society, May 3, 1917.

1917 Twelfth Annual Report of the Board of Water Supply of the City of New York

1918 Thirteenth Annual Report of the Board of Water Supply of the City of New York

1919 Fourteenth Annual Report of the Board of Water Supply of the City of New York

1920 Fifteenth Annual Report of the Board of Water Supply of the City of New York

1921 Sixteenth Annual Report of the Board of Water Supply of the City of New York

1922 Seventeenth Annual Report of the Board of Water Supply of the City of New York

1928 Catskill water supply. A general description, by Board of Water Supply of the City of New York. December, 1928.

1931 New Jersey v. New York, 283 U.S. 805, May 25, 1931, United States Supreme Court

1932 "World's Longest Water Tunnel" from Popular Science, Volume 121, Number 6, Page 35 (December 1932) City water tunnel number 2

1937 Giant Tube to Supply Water for Ten Milllions" from Popular Science, Volume 68, Number 2, Page 214-215 (August 1937)

1937 The Water supply of the city of New York.

1948 William C. Whitney, Modern Warwick, by Mark David Hirsch
Page 127:  Navarro water meter case

1952  Water supply of the City of New York.by New York Department of Water Supply, Gas and Electricity.

1954 Amended Decree, June 7, 1954, Supreme Court of the United States

1956 Water for the Cities:  A History of the Urban Water Supply Problem in the United States by Nelson Blake, includes several chapters on New York City.

1962 "New York City," from Public Water Supplies of the 100 Largest Cities in the United States, 1962, US Geological Survey Water Supply Paper 1812, by Charles Norman Durfor and Edith Becker

1971 The reminiscences of John B. Jervis, engineer of the Old Croton. Edited, with introduction, by Neal Fitzsimons. Foreword by Robert Vogel.

1977 The "practicable" engineer: John B. Jervis and the old Croton Aqueduct by Larry D. Lankton,  Essays in Public Works History 5:1-30 (1977)

1978 "The Old Croton Aqueduct," by George H. Rappole, IA. The Journal of the Society for Industrial Archeology 4(1):15-25 (1978)

1984 Old Croton Aqueduct from Historic American Engineering Record NY-120

1992 The Old Croton Aqueduct: Rural Resources Meet Urban Needs, by Jeffrey Kroessler

1993 Water for New York City, Edward Hageman Hall, revision of The Catskill Aqueduct and Earlier Water Supplies of the City of New York: With Elementary Chapters on the Source and Uses of Water and the Building of Aqueducts, and an Outline for an Allegorical Pageant by Edward Hageman Hall (1917)

1996 "The hydraulics revolution: Science and technical design of urban water supply in the enlightenment," by Edward Howard Winant, PhD dissertation in History, West Virginia University.  Includes chapters on the history of water works in New York City.

2000 Water for Gotham by Gerard T. Koeppel

2002 Liquid Assets: A History of New York City's Water System, by Diane Galusha

2006 Water-works : the architecture and engineering of the New York City water supply, by Kevin Bone, Gina Pollara, Albert F. Appleton.  This is an excellent book with many photographs and engineering drawings.
Pages 26-51: "The Rise to Croton," by Gerard Koppel 

2011 The Croton Waterworks:  A Guide to the Preservation and Interpretation of Historic Infrastructure, Historic Preservation Studio II, Spring 2011

2013 History of NYC Water System by Catskill Watershed Corporation

2013 The Contentious History of Supplying Water to Manhattan by Lauren Robinson, Museum of the City of New York

2013 Empire of Water: An Environmental and Political History of the New York City Water Supply by David Soll

2014 The Croton and Catskill Systems: Meeting the Demand for Water in New York City by Lauren Robinson, Museum of the City of New York

2015 Delaware Aqueduct Rondout-West Branch Bypass Tunnel Project

2015 Gilboa Dam Reconstruction Project

2015 New York City Tunnel No. 3

Old Croton Aqueduct from Wikipedia

New Croton Aqueduct from Wikipedia

Catskill Aqueduct from Wikipedia

Croton Aqueducts from Croton Histories & Mysteries

Delaware Aqueduct from Wikipedia

Evolution of New York City's Water Supply

Wooden Cisterns

Water towers: NYC's misunderstood icons

NYC water towers: History, use, and infrastructure

Water Towers in New York

NYC’s wooden water tanks plagued by ‘widespread neglect’: report

Up on the Roof: NYC's Water Tanks Are Here to Stay



© 2018 Morris A. Pierce