Documentary History of American Water-works

Introduction Historical Background Chronology Geography Biography Technology Ownership and Financing General Bibliography
Middle Atlantic States Pennsylvania Chambersburg

Chambersburg, Pennsylvania

Chambersburg was settled in 1730.

The Chambersburg Water Company was incorporated in 1817 with Thomas Hartley Crawford, Philip Berlin, George Brown, James Wright and Jacob Grove appointed as commissioners. This company built a system using wooden pipes, but they soon rotted out and the system was abandoned around 1823.

A second Chambersburg water company was incorporated in 1849 with George A. Madeira, Frederick Smith, William Seibert, Matthias Nead, George Garlin, George S. Eyster, James Nill, Martin Newcomber and William M'Lellan appointed commissioners.  No evidence has been found that this company constructed a water system.

The borough of Chambersburg constructed a water system in 1875.

Water is provided by the borough of Chambersburg, which also provides water to the Bear Valley Water Authority.


References
1817 An act authorising the Governor to incorporate the Chambersburg Water Company, March 24, 1817

1849 An act to incorporate the Chambersburg water company, January 31, 1849

1878 Historical Sketch of Franklin County, Pennsylvania: Prepared for the Centennial Celebration, Held at Chambersburg, Pa., July 4, 1876
Page 96: WATER WORKS.
About the year 1818 the first attempt was made to introduce water into our town. It was taken from the Falling Spring, about a half mile east of the railroad bridge, being forced thence to the reservoir (which was where the dwelling of Samuel Myers now is) by the power of the stream acting upon the buckets of a large water wheel placed in the current. The pipes extended through Market street to Franklin, a short way on Second street, and on Main street from King street to German. There were no fire plugs—nothing but hydrants for family use—and the reservoir being small, the works were wholly useless in times of fire. The pipes soon rotted out, and by the year 1823 the whole thing was abandoned. Being very primitive in all their appointments, these works could not have been very expensive, although some of our old citizens say that they cost about forty thousand dollars.

Our present excellent water works are the property of the borough, constructed through the energy of our Town Council. They ,are said to be well built, and reflect great credit upon all connected with their erection. Their total cost is about fifty five thousand dollars.

1887 "Water-Works" from History of Franklin County, Pennsylvania





© 2015 Morris A. Pierce