History of the Campuses and Buildings of the University of Rochester
United States Hotel Prince Street Campus Eastman School of Music Medical Center River Campus Mid-Campus South Campus Mt. Hope Campus Graduate, Family and Veteran Housing Central Utilities Other Off-Site Buildings
Eastman School of Music Annex 1


Eastman School of Music Annex 1 from Rochester Public Library

The first Eastman School Annex of five stories was built on the east side of Swan street and opened in 1924.  The building included a bridge to the stage entrance of the Eastman Theatre and provided furnished space for orchestral rehearsals, ballet training, and the preparation of properties for operatic spectacles.

Executives of the School and Theatre were assigned garage space on the ground level.  The building was torn down in 1978 when structural issues were uncovered.



References
1923 "Eastman Theater Commences Work of Cleaning Site for $125,000 Five-Story Annex," Democrat and Chronicle, August 9, 1923, Page 19.
54 Swan Street

1924 "The New Building," The Note Book, March 31, 1924, Page 5.

1926 Plat Book of the City of Rochester
Plate 8:  Eastman School Annex and Powerhouse

1935 Plat Book of the City of Rochester  
Plate 1:  Eastman Theatre Annex

1977 History of the University of Rochester, 1850-1962, by Arthur J. May.  Expanded edition with notes
Chapter 18, The Birth of a Music Center
Since the facilities for teaching soon proved inadequate, two annexes were erected along Swan Street. The first, of five stories, adjacent to the Theatre and available in 1924, furnished space principally for orchestral rehearsals, ballet training, and the preparation of properties for operatic spectacles; a runway crossed over to the stage entrance of the Theatre. Executives of the School and Theatre were assigned garage space on the ground level;

1978 "Eastman's ballet plan crumbles," Democrat and Chronicle, April 19, 1978, Page 23.
Eastman School of Music's Annex 1 building, formerly known as the George Eastman Theater Ballet School, is being torn down.


2021 Morris A. Pierce