Documentary History of American Water-works

Introduction Historical Background Chronology Geography Biography Technology Ownership and Financing General Bibliography
New England States Connecticut Middletown

Middletown, Connecticut

Middletown was incorporated as a city in 1784 and consolidated with the town of Middletown in 1923.

The city built a gravity system in 1866.

Water is provided by the City of Middletown


References
1865 An act to Provide for a Supply of Pure and Wholesome Water for Public and Private Purposes in the City of Middletown.  July 20, 1865

1871 An act in addition to and in amendment of An act to Provide for a Supply of Pure and Wholesome Water for Public and Private Purposes in the City of Middletown.  July 5, 1871.

1882 Middletown, from Engineering News 9:84 (March 11, 1882)

1884 History of Middlesex County, Connecticut: With Biographical Sketches of Its Prominent Men
Pages 91-92:  The Middletown Water Works.
The city water works, which are located on the Laurel Brook, on the division line between Middletown and Middlefield, were constructed in 1866, under the supervision of George H. Bishop, civil engineer, a native of Middletown, who was at that time president of the board of water commissioners. The plans of the works were drawn by Mr. Bishop, Michael H. Griffin being the contractor for constructing the reservoir, and George H. Norman contracting for the balance of the work. The reservoir covers about 72 acres and has a capacity of 200,000,000 gallons. The entire inclosure covers 86 The fall to Main street is 168 feet, and to low water mark on the river, 220 feet. The water is conducted through 18 miles of main and distributing pipe, connected with which are 106 gates, 86 fire hydrants,and 1,100 service pipes. This affords ample protection to the city against fire and dispenses with the use of fire engines, all except the remaining hose companies having been disbanded several years since.
Professor W. O. Atwater, who made an analysis of the water in 1883, reports that “these examinations indicate that, aside from the minute plants that occur in the sum. 1ner and fall, and the products of their decay, our city water is as pure and wholesome as we need wish."
The entire cost of the works, as shown by the report of the commissioners for 1883, was $225,436.82. The first cost was about $168,000, to meet which,city water bonds, running for ten, twenty, and thirty years, bearing 6 per cent. interest, were issued. The total amount of bonds issued was $177,000. The annual income for the use of the water by residents of Middletown has exceeded the annual expenses, and there is at the present time a surplus in the treasury of $21,437.73.
The first board of water commissioners consisted of Benjamin Douglas, Charles C. Hubbard, and George H. Bishop. The present officers are: C. R. Lewis, president; J. C. Broatch, secretary and superintendent.

1888 "Middletown," from Manual of American Water Works, Volume 1.

1890 "Middletown," from Manual of American Water Works, Volume 2.

1891 "Middletown," from Manual of American Water Works, Volume 3.

1897 "Middletown," from Manual of American Water Works, Volume 4.

1901 "Payment by the City for the Public Use of Water," Water and Gas Review 12(9):15-16 (March, 1902)





© 2018 Morris A. Pierce