Documentary History of American Water-works

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Middle Atlantic States
New Jersey Hackettstown

Hackettstown, New Jersey

Hackettstown was settled around 1754 and chartered as a town in 1853.

The Hacketstown Aqueduct Company was incorporated in 1811 by William Hampton, Benajah Gustin, William Little, junior, James Stewart and Ziba Osborn "for the purpose of supplying the village of .
Hacketstown with pure and wholesome water."  No evidence has been found that this company built a system.

A second Hackettstown Aqueduct Company was incorporated in 1853 (this time with two "t's") by William Rea, Robert Stelle, Lewis C. Cook, William L. Johnson and Robert Rusling "to bring and convey into the town of Hackettstown, by means of pipes, conduits, forcing pumps or other machinery, water from the Musconetcong river, or from some spring or springs."  This company built a gravity system.

The Town of Hackettstown acquired all of the capital stock of the Hackettstown Aqueduct Company by 1870 and acquired the system.

The water system was transferred to the Hackettstown Municipal Utilities Authority, which was created by the Town of Hackettstown on February 15, 1965 pursuant to the Municipal Utilities Authorities Law, constituting Chapter 183 of the Pamphlet Laws of 1957, of the State of New Jersey, approved August 22, 1957, as amended and supplemented.

Water service is provided by the Hackettstown Municipal Utilities Authority.


References
1811 An act to incorporate the Hacketstown Aqueduct Company, February 6, 1811.

1853 An act to incorporate the Hackettstown Aqueduct Company, March 10, 1853.

1862 A supplement to the act entitled "An act to incorporate the Hackettstown Aqueduct Company," approved March tenth, eighteen hundred and fifty-three, March 13, 1862. 

1869 A Further Supplement to the act entitled "An Act to incorporate the Hackettstown Aqueduct Company," approved March the tenth, eighteen hundred and fifty-three, April 1, 1869.  Increased capital stock to $75,000.

1870 An Act to authorize the President and Directors of the Hackettstown Aqueduct Company to convey their works and franchises to "The Inhabitants of the Town of Hackettstown," and to provide for the management of said works. March 17, 1870.

1871 Supplement to an act entitled "An act to authorize the President and Directors of the Hackettstown Aqueduct Company to convey their works and franchises to the Inhabitants of the town of Hackettstown, and to provide for the management of said works," approved March seventeenth, one thousand eight hundred and seventy. March 22, 1871.

1874 A supplement to the act to authorize the President and Directors of the Hackettstown Aqueduct Company to convey their works, and so forth, approved March seventeenth, one thousand eight hundred and seventy. March 27, 1874.

1875 A Further Supplement to an act entitled "An Act to authorize the president and directors of the Hackettstown Aqueduct Company to convey their works and franchises to the inhabitants of the town of Hackettstown," etc., approved March seventeenth, eighteen hundred and seventy. March 31, 1875.

1881 History of Sussex and Warren counties, New Jersey, compiled by James P. Snell
Page 590:  IX. WATER-WORKS.
There are few towns more favorably situated for the introduction of water. At a comparatively small cost a fine reservoir was built on the side of Schooley's Mountain by damming up the largest mountain stream, thus securing an abundance of pure cold water at a sufficient altitude to throw it over the top of the highest buildings. In 1853 an act of incorporation was granted to the " Hackettstown Aqueduct Company." William Rea, Robert Steel, Lewis C. Cook, William L. Johnson, and Robert Rusling were appointed to receive subscriptions to the stock. The charter placed the capital stock at $10,000, with privilege to increase to $20,000, to be divided into shares of $20 each.
The company secured a site for a reservoir on Malvern Hill, and went to work. Pipes were laid through part of the town, but the supply was insufficient. As it was found a change would be necessary, legislative aid was again sought, and by an act approved March 17, 1870, the directors of the " Hackettstown Aqueduct Company" were authorized to transfer and convey all their works, property, and franchise to the "Inhabitants of the Town of Hackettstown."
Thus empowered, the town purchased all the stock and franchise of the aqueduct company for $21,000, and bonds of the town were issued, at the rate of seven per cent, interest, for the purpose of paying the original owners and further improving their works.
The first commissioners under the charter were John Shields, I. W. Crane, Reading Bell, Robert Rusling, Lewis J. Youngblood, and William L. Johnson. They were to serve as follows: Two for one year, two for two years, and two for three years, their respective terms of office being determined by lot.  After the purchase was made a new site was procured and the Schooley's Mountain reservoir built, since which the water-supply has been ample. It was found necessary to make a further issue of bonds, and the total water debt now amounts to about $54,000. The annual revenue derived from water-rates is $4200. The income more than pays the interest, and enables the town to pay off some of the outstanding bonds each year.

1882 Hackettstown, N.J. from Engineering News 9:304 (August 26, 1882)

1888 "Hackettstown," from Manual of American Water Works, Volume 1.

1890 "Hackettstown," from Manual of American Water Works, Volume 2.

1891 "Hackettstown," from Manual of American Water Works, Volume 3.

1897 "Hackettstown," from Manual of American Water Works, Volume 4.

1911 History of Warren County, New Jersey by George Wyckoff Cummins
Page 149:  Hackettstown is fortunate in owning its water supply. In 1853 the Hackettstown Aqueduct Company was incorporated, and for nearly twenty years supplied the citizens with water. In 1870 the company conveyed all its property to the town for $21,000, and a new reservoir on Schooley's Mountain was added to the one on Malvern Hill. Since then a third reservoir has been constructed, giving an abundant supply of water. The income from the water supply will have wiped out all of the town's indebtedness by 1912, and thereafter the net income from the water supply will be sufficient to meet all the expenses of municipal government.

2012 The Town of Hackettstown Municipal Utilities Authority Financial Statement





2015 Morris A. Pierce