Documentary History of American Water-works

Introduction Historical Background Chronology Geography Biography Technology Ownership and Financing General Bibliography
Middle Atlantic States New York Malone

Malone, New York

The Village of Malone was settled around 1765.

The Malone Aqueduct Association was chartered in 1810 by Appleton Foot, George F. Harrison, Warren Powers, and apparently installed a system as old pipe logs were discovered some time later on village streets.

The Malone Water Works Company was chartered in 1857 by Samuel C. Wead, Benjamin Raymond, Hiram H. Thompson, Edwin L. Meigs, Ebenezer Man, Calvin Skinner, William A. Wheeler, Obadiah T. Hosford, William King, Reuben S. Brown, Daniel Brown, William G. Dickinson, Hiram Horton, John A. Fuller, Andrew W. Ferguson, Nathan Knapp, Abraham C. Lewis, Howard E. King, and William Wallace King. This company constructed a system using cement-lined wrought-iron pipe that was expanded several times but never fully meet the needs of the residents.

The Village of Malone bought the company in 1906 for $225,000 and currently provides water in the community.


References
1810 An act incorporating the Malone Aqueduct Association. March 19, 1810.

1857 An act to incorporate the Malone Water Works Company, March 23, 1857

1882 Malone, from Engineering News 9:58 (February 18, 1882)

1882 Malone, from "The Water-Supply of Certain Cities and Towns of the United States," by Walter G. Elliot, C. E., Ph. D.

1886 An act amendatory of chapter one hundred and fifty-six of the laws of eighteen hundred and fifty-seven, incorporating the Malone Water-Works Company, and authorizing said company to increase its capital stock and to contract with the village of Malone for a supply of water. April 21, 1886

1888 "Malone," from Manual of American Water Works, Volume 1.

1890 An act to amend chapter one hundred and fifty-six of the laws of eighteen hundred and fifty-seven, entitled "An act to incorporate the Malone Water Works Company," as amended by chapter one hundred and sixty-one of the laws of eighteen hundred and eighty-six, aud authorizing said company to make agreements, contracts, grants and leases for the sale, use and distribution of water in the village or town of Malone. March 11, 1890.

1890 "Malone," from Manual of American Water Works, Volume 2.

1891 "Malone," from Manual of American Water Works, Volume 3.

1897 "Malone," from Manual of American Water Works, Volume 4.

1900 An act to amend chapter one hundred and fifty-six of the laws of eighteen hundred and fifty-seven, entitled "An act to incorporate the Malone Water Works Company," and authorizing said company to purchase, take and hold real estate for the purpose of supplying the town of Malone with pure and whole some water. April 23, 1900,

1907 In the matter of the application of Malone village, Franklin county, New York, for approval of its maps and profiles of its new source of water supply, from Annual Report of the State Water Supply Commission of New York, Issue 2.

1908  In the matter of the application of Malone village, in the County of Franklin, in said State of New York, for approval of its maps and profiles of an additional source of water supply, from Annual Report of the State Water Supply Commission of New York, Issue 4, Documents of the Assembly of the State of New York, Volume 8, 1909

1918 Historical Sketches of Franklin County and Its Several Towns: With Many Short Biographies, by Frederick Joel Seaver
Page 419: p 419
As early as 1810 the Malone Aqueduct Association was incorporated by act of the Legislature to supply the village of Malone with wholesome water by means of aqueducts. Appleton Foote, George F. Harison and Warren Powers were named in the act to receive subscriptions for stock, which might be issued in ten dollar shares to the aggregate amount of fifteen thousand dollars. The right to condemn lands and water was conferred, and it was provided that dividends of not to exceed fourteen per cent, might be paid on the stock, while all earnings in excess of that percentage were to be paid to the treasurer of the village, for application to the cost of employing a night watch. Inasmuch as there was then no village, nor any treasurer, the latter provision seems absurd, though indicative of a prevalent desire to have public order conserved; and delve though you should deeper than the ditches were excavated, you will find no record of what the association did, nor how it throve or languished. It is a fact, however, that something like a third of a century ago, during the progress of work on our present water system, pipe logs were found on Water and Catherine streets, no memory of the laying or use of which even the oldest inhabitant recalled, and it was understood that similar pipes were laid on Webster and Alain streets. There was, too, in the long ago a pipe line from the Hosford Spring, east of the fair grounds, across the Flat, but whether it belonged to the 1810 system is not known. The source of supply for the Foote-Harison-Powers system was a spring in the then Parmelee sugar bush, which was east by south from the Webster street cemetery. Such an enterprise in such a time is certainly remarkable.

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Until 1857 the village inhabitants were wholly dependent for their water supply upon the river, cisterns, wells and springs. Baptiste Monteau had a  hogshead on a truck in which he conveyed water to families from the river, and  it was customary for many families to fetch water in pails from springs or their neighbors' wells (both of which were more numerous then than now) for drinking uses. In 1857 the Malone Water-Works Company was incorporated, and purchased a spring, flowing a hundred thousand gallons a day, south of the village, as a source of supply. Mains which were supposed at the time to be abundantly large, but which proved to be wretchedly insufficient, were laid along ,the principal streets, and it was thought that provision had been made to cover all domestic and fire needs of the village "for generations to come;" but less than twenty years had elapsed when clamor for more water began to be insistent, and after a time another spring near by, and then still another, to the east, and even the Branch stream, were added one after another to the system. Still the supply was inadequate, and the head for fire purposes miserably insufficient. In 1888 the water company was reorganized, with a considerable increase of capital, the Horse brook, seven miles south in the Adirondack foothills, and fed altogether by springs, became the principal source of supply, with mains of a capacity to deliver a million gallons a day at the reservoir, which was located on the Pinnacle, near the village, at an elevation that affords a pressure of ninety pounds in the business center. Though there is no finer system anywhere, nor any purer water, which, however, would be preferable if it were less "hard," there is still complaint at times that the quantity is insufficient. The village acquired the works by purchase at a cost of $225,000 in 1906, and the revenue from rentals is enough to meet interest obligations and to cover payment of bonds as they come due, as well as to cover expenditures for maintenance and extensions. The village has no other indebtedness except about $75,000 for brick paving.
 





2015 Morris A. Pierce