Documentary History of American Water-works

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North Central States
Ohio Middletown

Middletown, Ohio

Middletown was incorporated as a village in 1833 and as a city in 1886.

The Village of Middletown reserved the right to distribute water from the Middletown Hydraulic Company canal in 1852, but no evidence has been found that it did so.

The Village was authorized to issue $75,000 worth of bonds in 1872, and constructed a Holly water works system with a 2 MGD Quadruplex pump powered from the Hydraulic Company.  The system began operation on April 25, 1875.

Water is provided by the City of Middletown.  


References
1852 "An agreement between the Middletown Hydraulic Company and Incorporated Village of Middletown," Ordinances of the city of Middletown (1915)
Pages 151-152:  That the citizens of said Town of Middletown shall at all times be permitted, quietly and peacefully, to use water from said canal for hydraulic (hydrant) purposes, and that the Mayor or Trustees of said town shall have the privilege of conveying water from the canal pipes or otherwise, for the purposes of extinguishing fires and for domestic purposes; such water to be conveyed from said canal or race under the direction of a competent engineer. (April 13, 1852)

1872 An act to authorize the council of the incorporated village of Middletown, Butler county, Ohio, to borrow money for the construction of Water Works for said village for fire and other purposes.  March 29, 1872.

1873 An act to amend an act entitled "An act to authorize the council of the incorporated village of Middletown, Butler county, Ohio, to borrow money for the construction of Water Works for said village for fire and other purposes," passed  March 29, 1872.  April 10, 1873.

1873 An act to amend section two (2) of an act passed April 10, 1873, entitled An act to amend an [act] entitled "An act to authorize the council of the incorporated village of Middletown, Butler county, Ohio, to borrow money for the construction of Water Works for said village for fire and other purposes," passed  March 29, 1872.  April 25, 1873.

1882 A history and biographical cyclopaedia of Butler County, Ohio, with illustrations and sketches of its representative men and pioneers, Volume 1.
Page 634:  In the Spring of 1852 the Middletown Hydraulic was projected. The State had just then contracted for the building of a new feeder dam at the old site, two miles north of the village. This, together with the rights reserved to Abner Enoch, the original proprietor, as far back as 1826, when the canal was located which rights the Hydraulic Company secured by purchase rendered the creation of valuable water power at that point at once practicable.  Mr. Martin became at once identified with the development of the works. In the Spring of 1853 he formed a partnership with Joseph Sutphin.  Thereupon they secured a lease of power from the Hydraulic Company with the exclusive privilege, for a term of years, of erecting a flouring-mill at that point.  The firm continued in the joint ownership of the mill till 1873. They were also engaged in the manufacture of paper with the Messrs. Wrenns, now Sutphin & Wrenn.  The flouring-mill firm is now Joseph Sutphin & Son.

1882 A history and biographical cyclopaedia of Butler County, Ohio, with illustrations and sketches of its representative men and pioneers, Volume 2.
Page 634:  The Holly Water-works are quite an addition financially, as well as a benefit otherwise, to the town. They were put in at a cost of $72,000, but it supplies the city with water, runs the fire department, and clears several hundred dollars over and above all expenses annually.  The water is furnished from a large well, thirty-five feet deep and fourteen feet, in diameter, and furnishes an inexhaustible supply of good, cool, clear, and pure water.  The pressure is sufficient to throw water one hundred feet high.

1883 Middletown, from Engineering News 10:109 (March 10, 1883)

1888 "Middletown," from Manual of American Water Works, Volume 1.

1890 "Middletown," from Manual of American Water Works, Volume 2.

1891 "Middletown," from Manual of American Water Works, Volume 3.

1897 "Middletown," from Manual of American Water Works, Volume 4.

1906 Middletown in Black and White, by Harry Simms
Pages 81-83:  The Water Works.  The purest and most healthful drinking water to be found in the state is that delivered to the people by the city water works, and its quality is appreciated by the consumers as well as by visitors to the city, who remark on its satisfying properties.
The works are under the control of the Board of Public Service, with Philip Menger as superintendent. The works were built thirty-two years ago, an issue of bonds to the amount of $75,000 having been authorized by the legislature.  William B. Ogelsby, Daniel Bowman, and Aretas Doty were the first trustees.  The system has been enlarged and the service greatly extended since then, and steam pumps added to the original power, the latter having been acquired from the Middletown Hydraulic Company.  The water works were given the unselfish and intelligent attention, in the early days, of William B. Oglesby, and to him the community owes a lasting debt of gratitude for his fostering care of the city's greatest utility.
Within the last year a new Holly pump has been installed.  It has a capacity of three million gallons every twenty-four hours.  The water supply comes form six twelve-inch wells, rigorous tests for twenty-four hours having failed to materially lower the water.  Improved valves and cylinders have been added to the old Holly pump, the Smith & Vail pump has been lowered seven feet, and a corresponding deepening of the well gives the city water works a capacity of eight million gallons every twenty-four hours, more than enough water to supply a city three times the size of Middletown. From the works extend one 16-inch and two 12-inch mains, decreasing in size as they ramify the city, covering over twenty-four miles of territory. Three and a half miles of pipe were laid last year, and a great deal is now being placed in needed portions of the city. There are 244 hydrants within the city limits, and every factory, mill and shop which has applied for it, has been given, free of all cost, water for their sprinkling and fire system, thus saving them hundreds of dollars. The total cost of the water works up to date is close to $300,000, and it is the city's most valuable asset and pride.  Each engineer, George Hinkle, Lawrence Gough, Alex. Foster, William Gephart and David Rolfe, have faithfully discharged their duties, their work having added materially to the superb completion of the magnificent system.

1998 Middletown Ohio, by Roger L. Miller and George C. Crout
Page 64:  The City Water works, which began operation on April 25, 1875, grew rapidly as the town expanded.  By 1900, it stood near its present site in what is called the Water Works Park.





2017 Morris A. Pierce