Documentary History of American Water-works

Introduction Historical Background Chronology Geography Biography Technology Ownership and Financing General Bibliography
New England States Maine Bar Harbor

Bar Harbor, Maine

Bar Harbor was incorporated as a town in 1796.

The Bar Harbor Water Company was incorporated in 1874 and built a gravity system.

The Eden Water Company was organized to compel the Bar Harbor Water Company to improve its service, and in 1893 the Bar Harbor company was sold to the Eden Water parties.

The company was purchased by the town of Bar Harbor in 2001.

Water in Bar Harbor is currently provided by the Town of Bar Harbor.


References
1874 An act to incorporate the Bar Harbor Water Company.  February 10, 1874.

1880 An act additional to An act to incorporate the Bar Harbor Water Company.  March 9, 1880.

1887 An act to grant certain powers to the Eden Water Company.  March 11, 1887.

1888 "Bar Harbor," from Manual of American Water Works, Volume 1.

1890 "Bar Harbor," from Manual of American Water Works, Volume 2.

1891 "Bar Harbor," from Manual of American Water Works, Volume 3.

1893 An act to grant certain powers to the Eden Water Company.  March 22, 1893.

1895 An act to amend the charter of the Bar Harbor Water Company.  March 26, 1895.

1897 "Bar Harbor," from Manual of American Water Works, Volume 4.

2001 An act to authorize the Town of Bar Harbor to Acquire the Bar Harbor Water Company.  May 9, 2001.

2001 Petition for Approval of Reorganization, Liquidation and Dissolution of, and Abandonment of Service by Bar Harbor Water Company And for Approval of Commencement of Service by the Town of Bar Harbor, August 28, 2001.  State of Mains Public Utilities Commission.

2005 History of the Bar Harbor Water Company 1887-2004, by Peter Morrison.  Prepared for the National Park Service.  Reprinted January 26, 2008) | also here |

2006 Continental Liar from the State of Maine: James G. Blaine, by Neil Rolde
Page 285:  Two years later, we find Blaine, after settling in at Bar Harbor, becoming involved in this municipality's affairs, and using his clout with the Maine legislature in lobbyist fashion.
At the time, the actual name of the town from which Bar Harbor sprang was Eden, Maine. Blaine's real estate man, Charles How, had formed the Eden Water Company in response to complaints that the existing utility, the Bar Harbor Water Company, owned by the Roddick family, wasn't doing its job. Mr. How enlisted (or most likely hired) Blaine to push a bill in Augusta that would allow the new company to supplant the old one.
A glance at the House Journal for March 16, 1887, demonstrates the effect of Blaine's mere presence in the Augusta statehouse. A Bangor representative named Barker, upon spying him, immediately sought recognition from the chair. "Mr. Speaker - I see upon the floor of this House a gentleman whom Maine has always delighted to honor, one of the greatest statesmen our country has ever produced. I move you, sir, that the House take a recess of ten minutes in order that the members may have the opportunity of shaking hands with the Honorable James G. Blaine."
One can imagine the scene as the lawmakers, Republicans and Democrats alike, rose from their seats and swarmed around the white-bearded visitor. He still knew how to get votes. Nor did it hurt that the judiciary committee to which the water company bill had been assigned included his trusty sidekick Joe Manley. Motions to kill his bill were beaten by margins of almost 3-1 in both bodies. It should be noted that this maneuver was used simply as a threat to the Roddicks so that they got their act together and gave better service to the fast-growing Bar Harbor community.

Digital Commons @ UMaine, many annual reports for municipalities.





2018 Morris A. Pierce