Documentary History of American Water-works

Introduction Historical Background Chronology Geography Biography Technology Ownership and Financing General Bibliography
New England States Maine

Maine

Maine was a part of Massachusetts until it became a separate state in 1820, and aqueduct companies chartered under Massachusetts law before 1820 are included here.

On March 8, 1821 Maine enacted "An Act enabling Proprietors of Aqueducts to manage the same" that is similar to the 1799 Massachusets law of the same name.

On March 17, 1899, the Kennebec Water District was incorporated and claims to be "first Water District formed in the country," but the Metropoliltan Water District in Massachusetts was formed four years earlier in 1895.  Water districts were intended primarily to serve multiple communities and/or to circumvent the strict debt limits on municipalities that restricted their ability to borrow money for water and other services.

According to the Maine Rural Water Association there are 152 water systems in Maine of sufficient size to be regulated by the Maine Public Utilities Commission—85 are districts, 29 are municipal and 38 are private systems.

The Maine Office of the Public Advocate maintains a web page with comparative water rates for systems in that state.


Alphabetical
Augusta
Bangor
Brunswick
Calais
Camden
Falmouth
Fryeburg
Hallowell
Orono
Paris
Portland
Rockland
Saco
Skowhegan
Waterville
Windham
Wiscasset
Yarmouth

Chronological
1797 1
Hallowell
1800 2 Camden
1800 3 Portland
1801
Saco
1804 4 Wiscasset
1805 5 Yarmouth
1812 6 Falmouth
1813 7 Fryeburg
1823 8 Saco
1825
Bangor
1828 9 Brunswick
1830
Augusta
1831 10 Skowhegan
1831 11 Windham
1834 12 Bangor
1837 13 Orono
1839
Paris
1850 14 Calais
1851 15 Rockland
1853 16 Waterville
Note: The second column in the chronological table above shows the order in which systems were built in the state. Where no number is shown, a system was proposed but not built.
6 Morris A. Pierce