Documentary History of American Water-works

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Middle Atlantic States New York Rochester

Rochester, New York

Rochester was first settled in 1811 and incorporated as the Village of Rochesterville on March 21, 1817.  The name was changed to Rochester on April 12, 1822 and it was incorporated as a city on April 28, 1834.

The first water works was authorized by the Village Trustees in 1820 for an aqueduct of 30 rods (≈500 feet) in length which was built by James Preston for $90.50.

The Rochester Water Works Company was incorporated in 1835 "for the purpose of supplying the city of Rochester with pure and wholesome water."  James Seymour, Isaac Hills, Isaac R. Elwood, George W. Pratt and Charles J. Hill appointed as commissioners to sell stock in the company.

A second Rochester Water Works Company was incorporated in 1852 by Levi A. Ward, Isaac R. Elwood, Azariah Boody, Charles A. Jones, William A. Reynolds, E. Darwin Smith, Hamblin Stilwell, Samnul Miller, William Buell, John B. Robertson and Freeman Clarke "for the purpose of supplying the said city of Rochester with pure and wholesome water."

This company issued reports in 1853 and 1860 describing proposed water works, but nothing was done until after the Civil War ended.  At this time the company engaged Alexander Easton, whose primary experience was in horse railroads, to manage construction of a water system.  After significant work and expenditures, this effort was deemed a complete failure by 1871 and the company was sold at auction in 1872 to Thomas B. Rand for $24,000.  Easton died three years later in Guatemala while building a railroad.

While the city was holding discussions with Rand about rebuilding the works, a board was water commissioners was established by the legislature with broad powers given to the Mayor.  The board engaged J. Nelson Tubbs as their engineer and after extensive legal wrangling, construction started in 1873. 

The city's system included a Holly direct pressure system to provide fire protection in in the downtown area using Genesee River water, and a separate gravity system taking water from Hemlock Lake.  The Holly system was completed in February 1874 and the Hemlock system on January 23, 1876.  Unfortunately the two systems were interconnected, leading to several cases of impure water from the river entering the Hemlock conduits.  This resulted in typhoid cases in 1911 and 1940.

The following maps show the 1876 Highland and 1909 Cobbs Hill reservoirs along with the 1904 and 1930 steel water tanks built by the Rochester and Lake Ontario Water Company on Cobbs Hill.



From 1935 City of Rochester Plat Book, Volume 1.

Growing demand for water resulted in a proposal to build a reservoir at Honeoye Lake, but the city instead built a water pumping station on Lake Ontario.


Map showing present water supply and possible future water supply from Honeoye Lake & Creek as recommended by Harrison P. Reddy & Allen Hazen, January 26, 1932. From  "History and Engineering of Rochester's Water Supply in its First Century," by Edwin A. Fisher, Proceedings of the Rochester Academy of Science, 7(3):59-95 (March, 1932), facing page 70.

Several court cases resulting from the various water systems have resulted in a great amount of information on the systems.

The Rochester and Lake Ontario Water Company was incorporated on December 30, 1902 to provide water to several suburban communities. The city had a tenuous relationship with this company, often competing but the city also bought water from the company as the Hemlock capacity proved inadequate for the growing city.  After passing through several hands, the company was acquired from the New York Water Service Corporation by the Monroe County Water Authority on March 5, 1959.


2019 Aerial Photo of Abandoned Water Tanks on Cobbs Hill

Water is currently provided by the City of Rochester, which has a history brochure and a page about Hemlock Lake, the city's primary water source.  Some areas of the city receive water provided by the Monroe County Water Authority.


References and Timeline
1817 An act to incorporate the village of Rochesterville, in the county of Genesee.  March 21, 1817.
V. And be it further enacted, That it shall be lawful for the trustees of the said village, or the major part of them, and their successors, to make, ordain, constitute and publish, such prudential by-laws, rules and regulations, as they from time to time may deem meet and to regulate proper; and such particularly as are relative to … public wells, pumps and reservoirs, or cisterns of water, for the extinguishment of fires and for other public purposes.

1818 "Fire!," Ontario Repository, May 5, 1818, Page 3.
It is with much regret we learn that the large flouring Mills, belonging to the enterprising Messrs. F. Brown & Co. at Rochester, were totally destroyed by fire on  Friday night last, with about 4,600 bushels of wheat. The loss is estimated at not  less than 17,000 dollars.  As there had been no fire in the mill for two days previous, the manner of its communication is not yet ascertained. 

1819 Rochester Telegraph, December 14, 1819, Page 3.
Notice is hereby given, to the freeholders and inhabitants of the village of Rochesterville, (being qualified to vote for members of assembly,) that a meting will be held at the south district school-house in said village on Thursday the 23d inst. at 3 o'clock P.M. for the purpose of raising money by tax, to defray the expenses of a village watch - of conducting water by an aqueduct into said village, and for other purposes.
Ira West, Isaac Colvin, Everard Peck. Trustees.  Dec. 14, 1819.

1820 Meeting of the Board of Trustees of the Village of Rochesterville, June 22, 1820.
Voted that James Preston's contract for thirty rods of aqueduct be closed, and that the full sum of ninety dollars and fifty cents be paid the said James Preston for constructing thirty and a half rods which has been finished as by agreement.

1820 Rochester Telegraph, November 21, 1820, Page 3.
Notice is hereby given, that a meeting of the inhabitants of Rochesterville, will be held at the School-house near Mr. Sill's, on Wednesday, the 28th inst., at 6 o'clock P.M. to consider the expediency of raising money by tax to complete the Aqueduct in said village - to purchase land for a public burial ground - to pay a village watch - to purchase fire-hooks and buckets - to erect public hay-scales, and for various other purposes.
Matthew Brown, Jr., Moses Chapin, William Cobb, Charles J. Hill, Elisha Taylor, Trustees.  Rochesterville, Nov. 20, 1820.

1821 Annual Report of the Canal Commissioners of the State of New-York, February 27, 1822.
Pages 13-14:  On the sixth of June, proposals were received, and contracts signed, for opening a feeder from the Genesee river into the canal; for constructing a stone aqueduct across that stream; and for carrying the canal from the termination of our former contracts, on the east side of the river, westerly through the village of Rochester. The feeder is about two miles long, and laid on the east side of the river. It will be twenty-six feet wide on its surface, and three feet deep. The water is conducted into it by a dam across the river, placed a little below the head of a rapid, and which is eighteen inches high, and six hundred feet in length. The dam consists of two courses of timber, stretched across the river parallel with each other, at the distance often feet apart, and strongly bolted to a bottom of rock. The space between the two courses of timber is then filled in with gravel, which is secured from washing away, by a close covering of three inch plank. This dam is finished. Near the head of the feeder is a guard lock, to prevent the dangerous intrusion of floods. And after these works are completed, which they probably will be in May next, it is expected that, with a little additional expense, a good navigation, forty miles up the river, will be opened from the canal. 

1822 Rochester Telegraph, December 17, 1822, Page 3.
Notice is hereby given, that the subscriber in behalf of himself and his associates, intends to apply to the honorable the Legislature of the State of New-York, at their next Session, for the act of incorporation for the purpose of supplying the Village of Rochester and Brighton in the County of Monroe, with wholesome water by means of Aqueducts.- Dated December 14, 1822.  Thomas Benedict

1823 "Legislature of New-York," American (New York, New York), January 31, 1823, Page 2.
In Senate, Jan. 28.  The petition of Nathaniel Rochester and others was presented, praying for an act of incorporation for supplying the village of Rochester with pure and wholesome water; referred.

1823 Journal of the Senate of the State of New York
Pages 41-42:  January 28, 1823. The petition of Thomas Benedict, on behalf of himself and his associates, praying for an act of incorporation, whereby they  may be enabled to supply the village of  Rochester with pure and wholesome water, was read, and, together with the petition of N. Rochester, and  others, inhabitants of the village of Rochester, on the same subject, referred to a select committee, consisting of Mr. Spencer, Mr. Redfield, and Mr. Green.
Page 57: February 1, 1823.  Mr. Spencer,from the select committee,to whom was referred the petitions of Thomas Benedict, and of divers inhabitants of Rochester, praying an act of incorporation, for the purpose of supplying the said village with pure and wholesome water, reported as follows,to wit:- That they have had the subjects referred to them under consideration; that they find that notice of the application has been published for the time, and in the papers required by law; that, in their opinion, the object of the petition is important to the interests and convenience of said village, is reasonable and proper, and ought to be granted; and they have accordingly prepared a bill, which they beg leave to introduce.-Ordered, That leave be given to bring in such bill. Mr.Spencer, according to leave, brought in the said bill, entitled “an act for incorporating the Rochester Aqueduct Association,” which was read the first time, and by unanimous consent, was also read a second time, and committed to a committee of the whole.
Page 71:  February 7, 1823.  The  said engrossed bill, entitled “an act for incorporating the Rochester Aqueduct Association, ”was read the third time. Thereupon, Mr. President put the question, shall the bill now pass ? and   it was decided in the negative, two thirds of all the members elected to the Senate not voting in favor of said bill, as follows,to wit:
Page 75: February 8, 1823.  Resolved, that the Senate do reconsider their vote taken yesterday, on not agreeing on the engrossed bill, entitled "an act for incorporating the Rochester Aqueduct Association," on its third and last reading.
Page 80:  February 10, 1823.  The Senate then took up the consideration of the bill, entitled "an act for incorporating the Rochester Aqueduct Association." Thereupon, Mr. President put the question, shall the bill now pass ? and it was decided in the negative.

1823 Journal of the Assembly of the State of New York
Page 733:  March 24, 1823.  The petition of N. Rochester and others, praying for the passage of a law to incorporate a company for the purpose of supplying the village of Rochester with pure and wholesome water, was read, and referred to a select committee, consisting of Mr. Bowman, Mr. Stone, and Mr. Bradley.
Pages 748-749:  March 25, 1823.  Mr. Bowman, from the select committee, to whom was referred the petition of Thomas Benedict and others, inhabitants of Rochester, praying for an act of incorporation, for the purpose of supplying the village of Rochester with pure and wholesome water, reported: That they have had the subject under consideration, and find that notices have been published as required by law: that in the opinion of the committee, the object of the petitioners is important to the interests of the village of Rochester; is reasonable and proper, and ought to be granted; and they have prepared a bill, and ask leave to introduce the same.
Ordered, That leave be given to bring in such bill.
Mr.Bowman, according to leave, brought in the said bill, entitled “an act for incorporating the Rochester aqueduct association,” which was read the first time and by unanimous consent was also read a second time, and committed to a committee of the whole house.

1823 Rochester Telegraph, November 25, 1823, Page 1.
Notice is hereby given, that the subscriber in behalf of himself and his associates, intends to apply to the honorable the Legislature of the State of New-York, at their next Session, for the act of incorporation for the purpose of supplying the Village of Rochester and Brighton in the County of Monroe, with wholesome water by means of Aqueducts.- Dated November 10, 1823.  Thomas Benedict

1823 Rochester Telegraph, December 30, 1823, Page 1-1
Thomas Benedict employed on building of canal culverts and embankment over Irondequoit creek, states conditions of same, past and present

1824 Journal of the Assembly of the State of New York
Page 491:  February 16, 1824.  Mr. Remer from the committee on the incorporation of cities and villages, to whom was referred the petition of Thomas Benedict and others, his associates, for an act of incorporation. for the purpose of supplying the village of Rochester, with good and wholesome water, reported : The committee have had the subject so referred under consideration, and ascertaining that it would be necessary to make use of the Erie canal, to accomplish said object; the committee, therefore, thought proper, to submit the petition and bill, to the consideration of one of the canal commissioners, after all examination of said bill, it was returned with the following report, viz: “Having examined the bill, entitled “an act for incorporating the Rochester aqueduct association. I am of opinion, that the interest of the Erie canal, “and of the feeder from the Genesee river, are therein sufficiently secured “from all injury from said association.” Signed, MYRON HOLLEY, Acting canal commissioner, February 12, 1824.
The committee are, therefore of opinion, that the prayer of the petitioner is reasonable, and ought to be granted, and for that purpose they have directed their chairman to ask leave to introduce a bill. Ordered, That leave be given, to bring in such bill. Mr. Remer, according to leave, brought in the said bill, entitled “an act for incorporating the Rochester aqueduct association,” which was read the first time, and by unanimous consent was also read a second time, and committed to a committee of the whole house.
Page 1358:  November 25, 1824. Ordered, that the committee of the whole house be discharged from the further consideration of the bill, entitled "an act for incorporating the Rochester aqueduct association," and that the applicants have leave to withdraw their papers.

1827 Annual Report of the Canal Commissioners of the State of New-York, January 19, 1828.
Page 10:  For the purpose of obviating the difficulty at the head of the feeder from the Genesee river, the dam was raised fourteen inches. 

1830 Rochester Republican, June 1, 1830, Page 1-1
Samuel Works and B. H. Brown authorized to construct reservoir near corner of Buffalo and Fitzhugh Streets

1832 Rochester Republican, September 4, 1832, Page 2-6
Rochester has four mineral springs within its borders.

1832 Meeting of the Board of Trustees of the Village of Rochester, December 3, 1832
A communication was presented from Elisha Johnson, Esquire relative to supplying the village with water.

1834 Journal of the Assembly of the State of New York
Page 56:  January 9, 1834. The petition of sundry inhabitants of the county of Monroe, praying for the incorporation of a company for the purpose of supplying the village of Rochester in said county, with pure and wholesome water, was read and referred to the committee on the incorporation of cities and villages.

1834 An act to incorporate the city of Rochester.  April 28, 1834.
Title 8. Of the prevention and extinguishment of fires.
§18. Supply of Water. For the purpose of supplying the said city with water for the extinguishment of fires, and for other purposes, the common council may construct aqueducts from the Genesee river, or from any other permanent source, and may lay pipes in the streets and through the land of any person, doing as little damage as may be, and may thereby supply the public cisterns and reservoirs, and also any of the inhabitants of the said city with water, at such rates as may be agreed upon by them and the common council; and if, for such purpose, the common council shall deem it necessary, they may create a stock, to be denominated “the hydraulic stock,” not exceeding twenty thousand dollars, in such shares, and bearing such interest, as they may think proper; and may provide for the payment of such interest, and the reimbursement of such stocks by the sums which may be received for the use of such water; and the common council may make all necessary provisions to carry into effect the authority hereby granted them.

1834 Albany Argus, December 23, 1834, Page 4.
Notice is hereby given that the subscriber and his associates will present a petition to the legislature of the state of New-York at its next session, for the incorporation of a company to be styled The Rochester Water Works, for the purpose of supplying the village with pure water.  Chs. J. Hill

1835 An act to incorporate the Rochester water works company.  April 29, 1835.
§3.  The capital stock of the said company shall be ten thousand dollars, to be divided into shares of twenty-five dollars each.
§5.  James Seymour, Isaac Hills, Isaac R. Elwood, George W. Pratt and Charles J. Hill are hereby appointed commissioners to receive subscription to the said capital stock

1838 Annual Report of the Canal Commissioners, January 20, 1838, New York State Assembly Document No. 61
Page 43: A dam across the Genesee river; at the rapids, is nearly completed, which will supercede the necessity of maintaining the old feeder dam; and is about half a mile further down the stream. The new location will shorten the present feeder from the east side of the river, and render the situation of this canal, and the access from it to the feeder, more convenient. The dam is 300 feet long, 8 feet high, and rests on a rock foundation. It is made of round timber. The interior is filled with stone, and the upper side covered with plank and gravel. The dam is supported at each end with stone abutments laid in hydraulic masonry, and will be a substantial structure when completed.

1838 Meeting of the Rochester Common Council, January 16, 1838
On motion of Ald. Faulkner, Resolved that the Mayor be requested to report a plan and examination in relation to supply with with as recommended in his communication.

1838 A Report of the Mayor, to the Common Council of the City of Rochester, on the Subject of Supplying the City with Water: Agreeable to a Resolution of the Board, of the 16th of January, 1838, by Elisha Johnson, Mayor.  March 5, 1838.

1838 Settlement in the West: Sketches of Rochester by Henry O’Reilly | also here |
Page 328:  Hydraulions are connected with the machinery in some factories; which, worked by water power, have already rendered signal service in preventing the spread of fire in their vicinity.
Page 381:  Rochester Waterworks Company.  This corporation was created in 1835 for the purpose of supplying the city with "pure and wholesome water," to he conducted from a copious spring of excellent water situate in a tract of high and broken land on the southerly line of the city, near the new Cemetery and beside the river. The land is owned by Charles J. Hill. An organization is effected under the charter; but the works are not yet constructed. The directors, elected by the stockholders, are Levi Ward, Jr., Charles J. Hill, James M. Fish, Levi W. Sibley, and George W. Pratt—the first-named persons being president and secretary. The high grounds around the spring command a beautiful view of the city, &c.
Supplying of Water.   On the subject of supplying the city with pure water for culinary and other uses, Mayor Johnson followed up the suggestions of his inaugural address by a report to the Common Council on the 16th of January, 1838. This report has been issued in pamphlet form, twenty pages octavo, from the press of Luther Tucker. The importance of early and extensive arrangements for supplying all parts of the city plentifully with water—the increased facilities for comfort, health, and business, and the augmented security against fire, which would thus be afforded—together with the pecuniary economy of the measure, are set forth convincingly by this report. A calculation is made to show that the cost of the requisite waterworks would be speedily counterbalanced to the citizens by the diminished rate of ensurance consequent on such additional safeguards against fire as would be afforded by the branches of the works scattered throughout the city. The mayor suggests a plan for effecting these objects by forming reservoirs beside the river, wherein sufficient water could be secured to supply the city during the turbid state of the stream in high floods, &c. These reservoirs are calculated " to contain 12,315,646 gallons of water—an ample supply for the city during the longest river floods."
"The works would furnish daily about 1,500,000 gallons, or 450 gallons to each family of six persons, in a population of 20,000," says the mayor. "In other cities, the average quantity used for all purposes is about 150 gallons to each family of six persons in the entire population. We should be able to furnish this quantity to 10,000 families or 60,000 inhabitants. The actual cost of this water would be one cent for 605 1-3 gallons, or about 16 8-9 barrels." The estimates may appear low to those who consider not the local facilities for accomplishing the object.

1840 Rochester Daily Democrat, August 5, 1840, Page 2-3, 2-4
Works Streets to be constructed to river in order to provide means of obtaining water to extinguish fires.

1840 "For the Democrat," Rochester Daily Democrat, August 9, 1840, Page 2.
Letter about water works recommending use of iron pipes, by An Old Fireman.

1840 Proceedings of the Common Council of the City of Rochester, October 20, 1840.
Resolved That there be constructed hydraulic water works from the floom of Mill race in Aqueduct street to the corner of Mill and Work street to be constructed with iron pipes six inches in diamater and half an inch in thickness together with two hydrants, one at the corner of Buffalo and Aqueduct street and one at the west corner of Mil and Works streets.
Resolved That the City Superintendent be directed to close a contract with A. J. Langworthy for the iron pipes and hydrants for the water works.

1841 The Commissioners of the Canal Fund v. Kempshall, 26 Wend. 403, January 1, 1841, New York Supreme Court of Judicature

1841 Proceedings of the Common Council of the City of Rochester, March 1, 1841.
Ald. Arnold from the fire department committee reported in favor of allowing the account of A. J. Langworthy for iron pipe and hydrants at $857.15, agreeably with contract is accepted.

1841 "Dams at the Rapids," Rochester Daily Democrat, April 16, 1841, Page 2.

1843 Annual Report of the Canal Commissioners, January 14, 1843, New York State Assembly Document No. 25 
Page 79:  The new feeder dam across the Genesee river, at the rapids, has been partly removed as a nuisance, by the sheriff of Monroe, in pursuance of an order of the court of that county.
The removing of a part of the dam reduced the water in the river so low that it became necessary to repair the old feeder dam, which crosses the river about fifty rods above the new one, and raise the banks of the feeder between the old and new dam, to obtain a sufficient supply of water. It is believed that it will be necessary to maintain a dam at this point of sufficient height to afford the requisite supply of water for the canal.

1845 Rochester Daily Democrat, August 9, 1845, Page 2.
A reservoir is to be constructed at the junction of Andrews, Clinton and Franklin streets.  This is an important point.

1850 Letter from William A. Reynolds to N. Gray, Esq., June 8, 1850, Publications of the Rochester Historical Society, 21:96-97 (1943)
My Brother owns an Hydraulic Building on the south side of Buffalo St nearly opposite the Arcade Buildings, used as an oil mill in which I have just been putting up one of "Hubbards patent Rotating Engines" No 9 which is connected with the Arcade Property by large Iron pipes underground, with attachments for hose at different points in and about the buildings - this is nearly ready for operation, and has cost me several hundred dollars.

1850 "Rochester Water Works," Rochester Daily Democrat, June 28, 1850, Page 2.
Prof. Mason, in his lecture on Monday evening, gave it aa his opinion that this city would hereafter find it necessary, an account of the stratum of lime rock which underlies it, to procure its supply of water from the Caledonia or some other springs in the vicinity; and that when this plan was adopted, we should find it introduced into every dwelling, office, hotel and mechanics shop; and by a proper system of sewerage, the impurities accumulating in the city would be borne away, and this be one of the healthiest and most attractive places of residence in the world. So may it be.

1850 "Dr. Backus' Lecture," Rochester Daily Democrat, June 29, 1850, Page 2.
Doctor Backus suggested the idea of obtaining water from Lake Ontario, to supply the wants to the city; and thought that some day a huge hydraulic ram might force up to us the clear waters of that vast reservoir.  [Frederick F. Backus]

1852 An act to incorporate the Rochester Water Works Company.  April 16, 1852.

1853 "Water works survey made by Mr. Battin and James E. Bruff," Rochester Daily Union, May 25, 1853, Page 2.

1853 Rochester Daily Democrat, May 26, 1853, Page 2.
 Mr. Battin, an experienced engineer, has been engaged to make the necessary surveys for the contemplated Water Works in this city.

1853 An act to amend the act to incorporate the Rochester Water Works Company, passed April 16, 1852.  May 26, 1853.  Authorized the city to sell $200,000 worth of bonds to aid the company.

1853 Rochester City Council Proceedings 1852-1853
Water Works, Pages 546, 567, 577, 581, 585

1853 "Rochester Water," The Buffalo Daily Republic, July 1, 1853, Page 2.

1853 Buffalo Daily Courier, September 5, 1853, Page 2.
We learn from the Rochester American that Gen. C. B. Stuart, Daniel Marsh, Esq., and E. W. Serrell, Esq., of the firm of Stuart, Serrell & Co., New York, are at present in Rochester, engaged in making surveys for the Rochester Water Works Co. On the 1st October they will be prepared to report upon quite a number of different routes. It is their purpose, we learn, to make a thorough examination in respect to every possible source of supply. It is well that all the information, within reach, should be elicited on the subject.

1853 Rochester Daily Union, September 5, 1853, Page 2.
Daniel Marsh made surveys for Rochester Water Works Co. with General C.B. Stuart and E.W. Serrell.

1853 Engineers' Report for Supplying the City of Rochester with Water from Various Sources: Made to the Directors of the Rochester Water Works Co by Charles B. Stuart and Daniel Marsh, Firm of Stuart, Serrell & Co., Civil Engineers, New York.  October 1, 1853.

1853 Extracts Relative to Ball's Patent Indestructible Water Pipe as a Substitute for Cast-iron Distribution Pipe: Taken from the Report Made to the Directors of the Rochester Water Works Co. October 1st, 1853

1853 "The Water Works Project," Rochester Daily Democrat, October 6, 1853, Page 2.  Mr. Batten to bring water from Honeoye Lake for $570,000.

1853 "Water Pipes," Washington Sentinel (Washington, D.C.), October 15, 1853, Page 3. Reprinted from a Rochester newspaper.

1855 "The Water Works Meeting," Rochester Daily Union, October 19, 1855, Page 3.

1855 "Statement of the Water Works Company," Rochester Daily Union, October 20, 1855, Page 3.  Includes details of the original 1852 company and its proposal.

1856 Awards and Testimony in the Claims of the Rochester Mill Owners: For the Diversion of the Waters of the Genesee River, for the Supply of the Erie and Genesee Valley Canals, February 29, 1856.  Senate Document No. 103.
Page 36:  When the canal was first brought into use, the connection with the Erie was by a dam near the Genesee feeder, after the plan suggested in the act of 1836 authorising its construction. But as the dam flooded the farms up the river, it was abandoned, and the junction with the Erie was established a little west of where the latter crosses the Genesee in an aqueduct.
Page 82:  In 1839 the navigable connection of the Genesee Valley canal with the river, just above the guard lock on the Genesee Valley canal, was made; in 1842 the new feeder dam built in connection with the Genesee Valley canal was removed, and the navigable connection of Genesee Valley canal with river was closed.

1856 An act to repeal the twenty-sixth section of "An act to incorporate the Rochester Water Works Company" passed April 16th, 1852; and also to repeal an act amending said twenty-sixth section, passed May 26th 1853.  April 1, 1856.

1858 "National Hotel Endemic, Autopsy; with Remarks," by Jas. J. Waring, M.D., The American Journal of the Medical Sciences 69:97-104 (January, 1858)

1858 Charles Augustus Jones (1806-1858) grave, promoter of the 1852 Rochester Water Works Company | Monument in Mt. Hope Cemetery |
Prominent in the Democratic Party, died after attending President Buchanan's inauguration. 60 were poisoned at an inaugural event at the National Hotel in Washington D.C. during a plot to kill the president. The President had a separate staff of cooks.

1858 "Another Victim of the National Hotel Disease," The Baltimore Sun, January 30, 1858, Page 1.
Col. Charles A. Jones, contractor for the building of the customs houses at Chicago and Milwaukee and for the Washington aqueduct, died at Rochester, N.Y., on Monday last.  His health, it is stated had been impaired ever since his visit to Washington at the time of President Buchanan's inauguration.

1859 "Philadelphia firm interested in building water works for city: Lake Ontario and Hemlock Lakes to be considered as sources of supply," Rochester Union & Advertiser, February 3, 1859, Page 3.

1859 Proceedings of the Common Council of the City of Rochester.
Pages 74-75:  July 5, 1859.  Communication from Hon. Elisha Johnson, relating to supplying the city with water.

1860 "The Use of Wood for Water Pipes--Interesting Experiments," Rochester Union & Advertiser, March 9, 1860, Page 2.
Messrs. Wyckoff, Hobbie & Co., (the Company being Gen. Swan)

1860 An act to authorize the city of Rochester to sell the stock of the Rochester and Genesee Valley Railroad Company, and to assist in the construction of water works.  April 16, 1860.

1860 Rochester Union & Advertiser, August 13, 1860, Page 2
I. S. Hobbie engaged in building the Elmira Works

1860 Report on the introduction of a supply of pure water into the city of Rochester, September, 1860 by Daniel Marsh. | Also here, which is is missing pages 32 and 33 |
C. J. Hayden, President, Rochester Water Works Company

1860 "Water Works for the City," Proceedings of the Rochester Common Council 1860-61, Page 80, October 2, 1860.  Summary of the Marsh report.

1860 "Notice.- Supply of Water for the City of Rochester," The American Gas-Light Journal, 2(21):129 (November 1, 1860)

1860 "Water Works Proposals," Proceedings of the Rochester Common Council 1860-1861, Page 114-116, December 28, 1860.  Describes 3 proposals received in response to advertisements.

1861 "Proposed Water Supply for Rochester, N. Y.," The American Gas Light Journal, 2:221-221 (January 15, 1861)

1861 "Draft Contract with the Water Works Company," Proceedings of the Rochester Common Council 1860-1861, Page 123, January 22, 1861.

1861 "Proposal to supply water to County buildings," The Brockport Republic, January 24, 1861, Page 2.
Rochester Water Works Company proposal to supply water to the County buildings.

1861 "Water for the City," Rochester Union and Advertiser, January 25, 1861, Page

1861 "Contract with the Water Works Company," Proceedings of the Rochester Common Council 1860-1861, Pages 126-127, January 25, 1861.

1861 "The Water Works Contract," Rochester Union and Advertiser, January 26, 1861, Page

1861 "Water at Last," Rochester Union and Advertiser, January 26, 1861, Page

1861 "Water Works in Common Council," Rochester Union and Advertiser, January 26, 1861, Page

1861 "The Water Question," Rochester Union and Advertiser, January 28, 1861, Page

1861 New York Commercial Advertiser, January 29, 1861, Page 3.
The Rochester Water Works Company propose to construct water works for the city as a private corporation.  They will bring the water from the outlet of Hemlock Lake, in Livingston county, to the ridge South-east of the city, where there will be large distributing reservoirs.  The supply will be at least two million gallons per day, and the capacity of the water works may be increased in the future to an indefinite extent.  The company will lay in the streets of the city water pipes, as the Common Council shall direct, and put of 400 hydrants for fire purposes.  There will be 54 miles of distribution pipe and these hydrants located so as to be of the most service in the case of fire.  The company also agree to furnish water to ten fountains in the public parks of the city and supply the public schools, hospitals, asylums, &c.  In return for this, the city is to pay the company $50 per annum for each hydrant supplied with water as above.

1861 Syracuse Daily Journal, March 1, 1861, Page 3.
Going to the Bahama Islands.  Our fellow citizen, Gen. L. B. Swan, took his departure this morning for New York, whence he will sail in the steamer Karnak, on Monday next, for Nassau, in New Providence, one of the Bahama group of islands.  He General has for some time been afflicted with a severe bronchial affection, which he close application to business as one of the contractors for the building of the Water Works at Elmira, has considerably aggravated.  [Rochester Express.

1861 "Elmira Water Works," Rochester Union & Advertiser, December 17, 1861, Page 2
I. S. Hobbie and Lansing B. Swan, contractors of the Elmira Water Works, which were completed successfully.

1861 New York Times, December 24, 1861, Page 2.
Obituary.  Gen. L. B. Swan died at Rochester on Friday last, in the 53d year of his age.  He was born in Onondaga County, resided in Utica until his removal to Rochester, thirty years ago, where he engaged successfully in the business of manufacturing water pipe.  In June, 1851, he was appointed Brigadier-General by Gov. Hunt, and at once assumed command of the Twenty-fifth Brigade, Seventh Division, a position which he held until his death.

1862 Rochester Union & Advertiser, May 7, 1862, Page 2
C. K. Hobbie, I. S. Hobbie and J. M. Hatch elected to board of directors of Elmira Water Works.

1863 An act to amend the charter of the Rochester Water Works Company, and to authorize such company to borrow money, and to secure the payment thereof by bonds and mortgage.  April 17, 1863

1863 Proceedings of the Rochester Common Council 1863-1864, Page 44, June 2, 1863.
By Ald. D. D. T. Moore - Resolved that the contract between the Mayor and Common Council of the city of Rochester and the Rochester Water Works Company, made on the 18th day of January 1861, be and the same is hereby extended from the 1st day of January 1864 to the 1st day of January 1866, in the accordance with petition of Committee of said Water Works Company, presented this evening. - Adopted.

1864 Capt. Thomas Benedict (1782-1864) grave
Capt Thomas Benedict was born on April 22, 1782, in Ballston, New York, his father, Uriah, was 37 and his mother, Mary, was 34. He married Mary Dunning in 1804. They had two children during their marriage. He died on January 31, 1864, in Pittsford, New York, having lived a long life of 81 years, and was buried in Fairport, New York.

1864 Rochester Union and Advertiser, February 1, 1864, Page 2-8
Capt. Benedict dies in Fairport

1864 "Water Works," Rochester Union and Advertiser, February 19, 1864, Page 2.  Plan to bring Hemlock Lake water to Rochester discussed

1864 "Rochester Water Works Co., " Rochester Union and Advertiser, February 25, 1864, Page 4-5

1864 "Report of the Committee on the Lockport Water Works," Proceedings of the Rochester Common Council 1864-1866, Page 91, July 16, 1864.  The first Holly water works began operating in Lockport in August, 1863.

1864 "Common Council," Rochester Union and Advertiser, July 21, 1864, Page 2-3
Alderman took an excursion to Lockport to see the waterworks.

1864 "The Rochester Common Council and the Lockporters," Buffalo Commercial, July 23, 1864, Page 3.

1864 "Wyckoff's Patent Wood Water Pipe, I.S. Hobbie & Co." Moore's Rural New-Yorker, September 3, 1864, Page 291.

1865 "Wyckoff's Patent Wood Water Pipe, I.S. Hobbie & Co." Rochester Daily Democrat, April 18, 1865, Page 2.

1866 "The Water Question," Rochester Union and Advertiser, January 9, 1866, Page 2.
Mr. Hobbie said he had just received a letter from the Camden Iron Company at Philadelphia, which he read.  It gave the prices of iron pipe delivered at Philadelphia.  For the pipe requisite to lay a single 24-inch main from Smithtown to Rochester, and about fifty miles of city mains, the company would charge $895,000.  Mr. Hobbie added that wooden pipe would cost about $615,000.

1866 "Water Works Meeting," Rochester Union and Advertiser, January 9, 1866, Page 2.
The Secretary - who has been laboring many years to secure the adoption of wooden pipe or penstock logs in place of iron for such purposes, estimated their cost at $615,000.  It is fair to presume that in his anxiety to work in penstock logs, he has made the figure very much smaller than the results would justify.

1866 "The Water Works Meeting -- The Way Public Affairs Are Managed," Rochester Union and Advertiser, January 10, 1866, Page 2.

1866 Rochester Union & Advertiser, April 26, 1866, Page 2-2
Peter Roulea, is engaged in delivering daily pure spring water to families and others in the centre of the city who have no wells

1866 "Water Works," Rochester Union & Advertiser, July 7, 1866, Page 2.
It is talked in the streets that a Mr. Easton, of New Haven, has purchased of the "Rochester Water Works Co.," the right to construct water works for this city, on his own account pretty much.

1866 "Water Works Meeting," The Rochester Evening Express, July 7, 1866, Page 3.

1866 "Water Works," Rochester Union and Advertiser, July 11, 1866, Page 2.
A more reckless and absurd proposition was never made to a representative body. There were no reasons for such hasty action.

1866 "Report on the Subject of Water Works," Proceedings of the Rochester Common Council 1866-1867, Pages 77-78, July 16, 1866.  Includes the text of the contract with the City of Rochester and the Rochester Water Works Company which was adopted at this meeting.

1866 "The Water Works Question," Rochester Union and Advertiser, July 16, 1866, Page 2.
No wooden pipes are to be used.

1866 "The Water-Works," Rochester Evening Express, July 17, 1866, Page 3.
A Mr. Eastman, of Connecticut, proposes now to construct the water works under certain terms as stipulated in the contract.

1866 "The Sources of Water for Rochester - Smithtown and Honeye Creek," Rochester Union and Advertiser, July 26, 1866, Page 2.

1866 "Report on Water-Works," by Daniel Marsh, Engineer R. W. W. Co., Proceedings of the Rochester Common Council 1866-68, Page 10, September 18, 1866.  The whole of the iron pipe to complete the Rochester Water-Works has been contracted for and is now being cast.

1866 Proceedings of the Rochester Common Council 1866-67, Page 161,  December 12, 1866.
By Ald. Guggenheim - Whereas, on or about July 16, a contract was made between the City of Rochester and "the Rochester Water Works Company;" and
Whereas, the party of the second part agreed to commence the construction of Water Works by the 15th day of August last, and to prosecute the same with all reasonable diligence until the same shall be fully completed; and
Whereas, it appears that the party of the second. part did not seriously commence the construction of said works; therefore,
Resolved, That a committee of three be and is hereby appointed to investigate how far he "Rochester Water Works Company" have fulfilled their contract, said committee having power to go to Smithtown and report as early as possible; also, that no member or the Water Works Committee shall be placed on the special committee. Adopted.
The President appointed as such committee Ald. Guggenheim, Cope and, Remington.

1867 "Report of Committee on Water Works," Proceedings of the Rochester Common Council 1866-67, Page 168, January 8, 1867.

1867 "The Water Question," Rochester Union and Advertiser, January 28, 1867, Page 2.  Water from Hemlock Lake.

1867 "Just as We Expected," Rochester Union and Advertiser, January 29, 1867, Page 2.  Water from Hemlock Lake.

1867 "Report of the Special Committee on Water Works," Proceedings of the Rochester Common Council 1866-67, Page 175, January 22, 1867.

1867 New York Herald, March 5, 1867, Page 9.
Rochester Water Works Company.- Rochester, N. Y., February 27, 1867.- Sealed proposals will be received at the office of this company until Saturday, 9th March next, at noon, for digging and back filling 32 miles trenches in the streets of the city of Rochester, for laying the pipe of the Rochester Water Works Company.
A map and specifications may be seen at the company office. Daniel Marsh, Chief Engineer

1867 Buffalo Morning Express, March 12, 1867, Page 1.
At a recent meeting of the Board of Directors of the Rochester Water Works Company, the following directors were elected:  President, C.J. Hayden; Secretary, W.V. Turner; Chief Engineer, Daniel Marsh.

1867 An act to amend an act entitled "An act to incorporate the Rochester Water-Works Company," passed April sixteenth, eighteen hundred and fifty-two, to increase the capital stock, and authorizing the city of Rochester to aid in the construction of said works, pursuant to section twenty-six of said act.  March 26, 1867.

1867 Proceedings of the Rochester Common Council 1866-67, Page 212, March 28, 1867.
The Clerk presented the following:
MAYOR'S OFFICE, March 28th, 1867.  Gentlemen of the Common Council:
The great importance to the city of the Water Works about to be constructed, and of its answering fully the wants of the community, I would suggest the propriety of increasing the size of the conduit to be used from the lake to the reservoir that in place of twenty inches, the conduit be made twenty-four inches, and the capacity of the reservoir be increased to thirty million gallons; and further, that the water be taken from a point much nearer Hemlock Lake than heretofore agreed upon.  With these changes in the contract, the work will be of such character, it is believed, to meet the just expectations of citizens generally.
I likewise deem it of vital importance that the city take an interest in the stock sufficient to give them a voice in the management; this must be so apparent as not to need argument. The uses for fire purposes alone would require this safeguard. S. W. D. MOORE.

1867 "Common Council," Rochester Union and Advertiser, March 29, 1867, Page 2. 
Mayor requests that the conduit pipe be 24 inches instead of 20, and that the capacity of the reservoir be enlarged.
Council debates buying $150,000 of stock in the water works company, decides not to do so.

1867 "The Water Question," Rochester Union and Advertiser, April 4, 1867, Page 2. Questions about the water works.

1867 "Pure Water -- The Filter Trade," Rochester Union and Advertiser, April 4, 1867, Page 2.  Kodzie & Bunnel, manufacturers of water filters.

1867 "Water Works," Rochester Union and Advertiser, April 5, 1867, Page 2.  Response from the Water Works Company. | Rates |

1867 New York Commercial Advertiser, April 15, 1867, Page 2.
Water Works in Rochester.- The first pipe for the Rochester Water Works was laid on Friday last.  The water is to be brought from Hemlock Lake.  The first pipe was laid at the crossing of the Erie Canal.  The pipe is sixteen inches in diameter.  The contractor says that at least one hundred car loads of iron pipe were on the way to that city, and day by day from that time forward the citizens of Rochester would have ocular demonstration that the Water Works were being constructed.

1867 "The Water Works," Rochester Union and Advertiser, June 14, 1867, Page 2.
City's water works committee going to New York at Contractor Easton's expense.

1867 "The Water Works Question," Rochester Union and Advertiser, June 26, 1867, Page 2.
Easton seeks to have city subscribe to $150,000 of water company stock.

1867 "Report on Water Works," Proceedings of the Rochester Common Council 1867-68, Page 54, June 26, 1867.
Mr. Easton requested that in justice to himself and the satisfaction of the satisfaction of the public, a committee should be appointed to visit New York and investigate the whole matter and report upon the facts of of the case as they might find them to exist.  The request was acted upon and a committee consisting of his Honor Mayor Fish and Aldermen Cram, Qualthrough, Spencer, Groot and Mutchler visited New York in company with Mr. Easton, and at his expense.
At New York the committee learned that Mr. Easton had made arrangements with Willis Gaylord, Esq., No. 58 Wall street to furnish all the money necessary to build the works up to $1,000,000.  Mr. Gaylord was very frank and candid and answered all the questions put to him promptly and cheerfully, and his statements were deemed by the committee very satisfactory, and the committee satisfied themselves that he was fully able to carry about his agreement with Mr. Easton.  Mr. Gaylord sent a competent Engineer here to examine and report, and became satisfied that there was money in the undertaking and embarked in it to make money.
Mr. Gaylord had contracted with T. & F. Starr, Amboy, N.J., to make and furnish 4,000 tons of pipe, to be made and delivered as fast as possible.
A subcommittee consisting of Ald. Cram and Qualthrough went to Amboy to ascertain what progress, if any had been made there, and found that one barge load of about 250 tons had been shipped to New York, and they were loading another barge the committee arrived and about 200 tons more were ready for shipment.  [Note:  This was probably the iron works of J.W. & J.F. Starr in Camden, New Jersey, and the visitors probably traveled on the Camden and Amboy Railroad.]

1867 "The Water Works Question," Rochester Union and Advertiser, June 28, 1867, Page 2.  Response to June 26th letter.

1867 Proceedings of the Rochester Common Council 1867-68, Page 72, July 9, 1867.
By Ald. Quin, - Whereas the Water Works Company has laid its main pipe in Alexander street, from Monroe Avenue to East Avenue, upon the sewer in said street, without authority, and the same may result in damage, inconvenience and expense to property owners on said street, and to the city, therefore,
Resolved, That said Water Works Company is hereby forbidden to lay any of its mains upon any sewer in this city, or to injure or interfere with any sewer, in the construction its works, or laying any of its pipes within the limits of said city. This resolution shall not be construed as prohibiting said Company from laying its mains or laterals across any public sewer, when necessary, provided the same be done under the direction of the Sewer committee. Referred to committee on Reservoirs and Water Works. .

1867 "The Water Works," Rochester Union and Advertiser, October 25, 1867, Page 2.

1867 "More About Water," Rochester Union and Advertiser, October 26, 1867, Page 2.

1867 "Sales of Real Estate," Rochester Union and Advertiser, December 9, 1867, Page 2.
Geo. Shelton has sold the house and lot 66 South St. Paul street to Alex. Easton for $10,500.

1867 "Water Works," Rochester Union and Advertiser, December 18, 1867, Page 2.  Description of Henrietta Reservoir in letter from Mayor Henry L. Fish.

1868 "Water for Rochester," Rochester Union and Advertiser, February 4, 1868, Page 2.
We find that every contract and arrangement have been completed for making the large conduit that will convey the water from the Lake to great reservoir in Henrietta, and thence to the distributing mains in the city.  The lumber for this conduit is being sawed at Gulick's mill, in Ontario Co., at the rate of twenty thousand feet per day.  The terms called for will be employed to convey it from the mill to Blood's Station, on the Erie Railway, from thence it will be brought here by cars and made into pipes at an establishment on Warehouse street.  The pipes will be twenty-eight inches in diameter, made of staves sawed in the right shape, and banded with iron, the whole to be covered with pitch and tar.  Several car loads of this lumber have already arrived and preparations are made for turning out this pipe at the rate of a mile and a quarter per week.
The trenches for the mains from the city to the lake are already half dug, and some two hundred men are now digging daily.  It is confidently expected that water will be introduced to the city in four months from this date.

1868 "Citizens' Water Works Meeting," Rochester Union and Advertiser, February 8, 1868, Page 2.

1868 "About the Water Works," Rochester Union and Advertiser, February 14, 1868, Page 2.  Description of the works.

1868 "About Water Works," Rochester Union and Advertiser, February 20, 1868, Page 2.

1868 "An act to legalize the proceedings of the Rochester Water Works Company" and "An act to repeal certain acts in relation to the Rochester Water Works Company," Proceedings of the Rochester Common Council 1867-68, Pages 190-191, March 17, 1868.

1868 An act to ratify, legalize and confirm the proceedings of "The Rochester Water Works Company."  April 16, 1868

1868 An act to amend an act entitled "An act to amend an act entitled 'An act to incorporate the Rochester Water Works Company,' passed April sixteenth, eighteen hundred and fifty-two, to increase the capital stock, and authorizing the city of Rochester to aid in the construction of said works, pursuant to section twenty-six of said act," passed March twenty-sixth, eighteen hundred and sixty-seven, and to repeal certain sections of an act entitled "An act to authorize the city of Rochester to sell the stock of the Rochester and Genesee Valley Rail Road Company, and to assist in the construction of water works."  April 17, 1868

1868 Cleveland Leader, July 6, 1868, Page 1.
Friday morning, while a team was drawing a load of the wood pipe for the Rochester water works, on Exchange street, near the Genesee Valley Depot, one of the rear wheels gave out and down tumbled the pipe, rolling into the gutter.  In the topmost one lay the driver, who was rolled over and over against his will, and with no possible idea of where he was going.  He crawled out and views the situation, shook himself to see if no bones were broken, and then indulged in a hearty laugh at the accident.  The team very sensibly stood still, awaiting further orders.

1868 New York Herald, July 27, 1868, Page 6.
Avon Springs, N.Y., Mr. Easton, of Rochester, is also the possessor of four bays, which he harnesses to a double barouche.

1868 "First Mortgage Seven Per Cent. Bonds of the Rochester Water Works Co. For Sale Below Par.," The Evening Telegraph (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania), July 30, 1868, Page 6.

1868 "First Mortgage Seven Per Cent. Bonds of the Rochester Water Works Co. for Sale at 87½.," The Evening Telegraph (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania), September 7, 1868, Page 5.

1868 "Chief Engineer's Report, by Daniel Marsh, July 31, 1868," The Daily Evening Telegraph, September 3, 1868, Page 5.

1868 "Real Estate Sale," Rochester Union and Advertiser, September 15, 1868, Page 2-3.
Lorenzo A. Easton has sold the Reservoir premises in Henrietta to Christopher Quinn.  Consideration $3,863.40.

1868 "Rochester Water Works," Rochester Union and Advertiser, December 7, 1868, Page 2.

1868 "Rochester City Water Works, Report of Messrs. W. Milner Roberts and John C. Trautwine on the Rochester Water Works, October 1868," Rochester Union & Advertiser, December 9, 1868, Page 1.  Roberts and Trautwine were well-known engineers.
The construction presents one feature which at first sight would create an unfavorable impression, but which was rendered imperative by the small amount of means available for the work.  I allude to the use of a wooden main instead of a cast iron one, for carrying the water about twenty-five miles from Richmond Mills to the city, together with an interval of about two miles of sixteen-inch main of double-riveted and soldered galvanized sheet-iron.  This last was substituted for wood on account of its superior strength on that portion of the line at which the pressure of the water is the greatest.  The wooden main is in sections of about sixteen feet in length, and is formed of staves of pine or hemlock two inches thick, carefully prepared by machinery.  They are twenty-four inches in diameter at the down stream end and twenty-eight inches at the upstream end.  They are strongly banded with wrought iron hoops one quarter of an inch thick by from one and one half to two inches wide, and tightly driven at intervals of from one to two feet apart according to the strain brought upon them by the pressure of the water.  They are thoroughly coated outside with warm tar.  Owing to the completeness of the machinery at the work shop, and to the systematic course of proceeding, these pipes are prepared with such rapidity that a mile in length of them can readily be furnished in a week.  Both the wooden pipe and those of galvanized iron have been subjected to thorough tests to prove their entire adequacy so far as strength is concerned.  As to their durability we must, of course, rely upon the results of experience elsewhere for forming an opinion.
About thirteen miles, or one-half of the entire length of the wooden main, has already been laid, extending from near the city southward, also many crossings of natural streams and canals throughout the line.  The crossings are all buried below the bottoms or beds of the channels, the pipes follow the undulations of the ground.  All the pipes laid in the city itself, are of cast-iron, and very in diameter from four to sixteen inches. 

1868 Rochester Water Works Company share certificate, 30 shares of $50 each for Richard W. C. Merrington, December 16, 1868. John Williams, President. Darius Perrin, Treasurer.  Capital $800,000. | back |

1869 An act to amend an act entitled "An act to amend the charter of the Rochester Water works Company, and to authorize such company to borrow money and to secure the payment thereof by bonds and mortgage," passed April seventeenth, eighteen hundred and sixty-three.  April 20, 1869

1869 Rochester Water Works Loan bond certificate, $1,000 gold bond, May 1, 1869 | back | coupons |
Interest six per cent., payable in gold coin.  Andrew J. Wilkin, President; Richard W. C. Merington, Secretary.

1869 Proceedings of the Rochester Common Council 1869-70, Page 88, June 2, 1869.
By Ald. Qualtrough - Whereas, The Rochester Water Works Company have determined to take water for the supply and of our city at a point above Honeoye Outlet thereby render it certain that we shall obtain the pure water of Hemlock and Canadice Lakes; therefore,
Resolved, That the Board of Common Council of the city of Rochester, will heartily co-operate with the said Rochester Water Works Co. in the construction and completion of said works. Adopted.

1869 "We Have for Sale Six Per Cent. Gold Bonds of the Rochester Water Works Co.," The Evening Telegraph (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania), September 7, 1869, Page 6.

1869 "The Water Works," Rochester Union and Advertiser, September 17, 1869, Page 2.  Continuing construction of water works.

1869 "The Water Question," Rochester Union and Advertiser, November 5, 1869, Page 2-2.  Lack of funds, work suspended

1869 "The Water Question," Rochester Union and Advertiser, November 6, 1869, Page 2-2.  Editorial and special meeting of the Common Council.

1869 Proceedings of the Rochester Common Council 1869-70
Pages 229-230:  November 5-6, 1869. Special Meeting on Water Works  
The original contract with Alexander Easton has been abandoned, and a new contract made with Frederick Easton, who is now in Europe, but who, previous to his departure, executed a power to attorney to Alexander Easton to prosecute the work for him.  Alexander Easton subsequently executed a power to attorney to Richard Merrington, who is now prosecuting the work under the authority thus delegated to him.

1869 Rochester Union and Advertiser, November 7, 1869, Page 2-2.
Mr. Trautwine, engineer for the bondholders of the Rochester Water Works Co., left for New York last night.  He has been here making an examination of the work to report to his employers.  He has nothing to do with the company or construction.

1869  Proceedings of the Rochester Common Council 1869-70
Page 237, November 30, 1869. Water for Fire Protection

1869 Proceedings of the Rochester Common Council 1869-70
Page 239, November 30, 1869.  "Report from Bond Holders of the Rochester Water Works Company

1869 Act of incorporation and reports of the Rochester Water Works Company.  New-York: George F. Nesbitt & Co., Printers. 1869. 8vo, pp. 38.  No copy of this has been found.

1870 "Report on the feasibility of furnishing the county buildings with water," The Brockport Republic, January 20, 1870, Pages 3 & 4.  Recommends installation of a Holly pumping engine on the Genesee River to supply water to the county buildings.

1870 The Brockport Republic, January 27, 1870, Page 4.
Monroe County Board of Supervisors. Mr. Wilkin, representing the Rochester Water Works Company, addressed the board in reference to that company's furnishing water to the county institutions.

1870 The Brockport Republic, February 3, 1870, Page 3.
Monroe County Board of Supervisors. The special order of business for this hour, viz., the consideration of the report of the water works committee, was brought before the board, and after listening to the remarks of Hon. H. R. Selden, who represented the Rochester water works company, the further consideration was, on the motion of Mr. Montgomery, postponed until the next meeting of the board.

1870 Act of incorporation and reports of the Rochester Water Works Company. : Financial Agents for the sale of the Bonds, Utley & Dougherty, Bankers & Brokers.  E.S. Dodge & Co, Printers. February, 1870.
Page 26:  May, 1869 - Andrew J. Wilkin, President; Richard W. Merington, Secretary

1870 "Gold Loan of the Rochester Water Works Company," New York Evening Post, February 12, 1870, Page 3. 
Each Bond Represents Completed Work.
The Bonds of the Rochester Water Works Company will inevitably take rank with and command the price of the best Water Bonds in the country, and the opportunity to secure at the low rate we are now offering them at one that should commend itself to those seeking a safe, secure, local investment.
The main Pipe is now within three miles of Rochester, and it is estimated that an expenditure of less than $50,000 will bring the water to the city, and supply eight miles of Distribution Pipe, already laid in its principal streets.

1870 Buffalo Morning Express, May 25, 1870, Page 4.
The following officers were elected by the Rochester Water Works Company a few night since:  President, Hon. Henry R. Selden; Vice President, A.J. Wilkin; Secretary and Treasurer, W.H. McRae; Directors, Edward M. Smith, F.L. Durand, General John Williams, James L. Hathaway, William R. Utley, J.C. Winslow, George Shelton, Daniel Marsh.

1870 The Rochester Directory, July 1, 1870
Page 291:  Rochester Water Works Company - Incorporated 1852; Capital $800,000.  Offices, Main street corner S. St. Paul.  President, Henry R. Selden; Vice President, A. J. Wilkin; Secretary and Treasurer, W. H. McRae; Chief Engineer, Daniel Marsh; Directors, Henry R. Selden, A. J. Wilkin, W. H. McRae, Edward M. Smith, F. L. Durand, John Williams, James L. Hathaway, William R. Utley, I.C. Winslow, George Shelton, Daniel Marsh.  Annual meeting in May.

1870 "Water Works," Rochester Union and Advertiser, September 24, 1870, Page 2.  Compliments from Honeoye Falls correspondent on the progress of the Rochester Water Works.

1870 The New York Times, September 27, 1870, Page 1.
Rochester, Sept. 26.- The last conduct pipe of the Rochester water-works was laid today, making a complete line of seventeen miles from Smithton Creek to Rochester.

1870 Complete Notes of City Pipe, Rochester water works showing street connections, hydrants, gates and service connections, with diagrams of sections of streets, November 1, 1870Drawn by Horace Jones, Sur., Rochester, New York. Many thanks to Anna Raykovska for copying this book with her cell phone camera at the New York Historical Society Library.

1870 The Brooklyn Daily Eagle, November 8, 1870, Page 4.
The laying of the pipe for the Rochester water-works has been completed, making a line of seventeen miles.

1870 The Brockport Republic, November 10, 1870, Page 1.
Monroe County Board of Supervisors. Annual Session. Thursday, Oct. 12, 1870.  A communication was received from W. H. McRae, Secretary of the Rochester Water Works Company, announcing that the Company was now prepared to let on the water, and asking the Board to appoint a committee to confer with them as to the rates and amount of water required.
By Mr. Montgomery - Resolved, That the respective chairmen of the committees on penitentiary, Alms House, Insane Asylum and Court House and Jail, be requested to ascertain and report when and upon what terms water for the county institutions can be obtained from the Rochester Water Works Company, and that the communication just read be referred to them.  Adopted.

1871 Rochester Water-Works Company Agt. John Wood, January Term, 1871, New York Supreme Court, Fourth Department

1871 Rochester Water Works Co. v. Wood, 60 Barb. 137, January 2, 1871, New York Supreme Court | also here |

1871 "Water for Rochester," Rochester Democrat and Chronicle, March 3, 1871, Page 4.  Text of bill introduced by George D. Lord naming five water commissioners that would serve unlimited terms, with any vacancies filled by the Common Council.  The plan of the commissioners would be subject to approval by local voters.

1871 Proceedings of the Rochester Common Council 1870-71 
Page 291:  March 21, 1871. Common Council Protest against proposed Act to Create a Board of Water Commissioners.

1871 "The Water Bill," Rochester Democrat and Chronicle, April 18, 1871, Page 4.  Letter from "Tax-payer" and comments.

1871 Rochester Democrat and Chronicle, April 25, 1871, Page 4.
The Water Bill was recalled from the hands of the governor by Senator Lord, after it had passed both houses of the legislature, at the instance of the Citizens Association, an organization composed of many of our largest tax-payers.  We trust that the Water Works Company will now push their enterprise with the utmost dispatch.  The bill which was abandoned was very defective: but that affords no reason for our city to be deficient of pure water. 

1871 "To Holders of Rochester Water-Works Company Bonds," New York Tribune, April 28, 1871, Page 7.
At the request of Utley & Dougherty, the holders of the bonds of this Company are respectfully requested to meet at the Office of Utley, Dougherty & Scott, 11 Wall-st, on Saturday, next, April 20, at 12 o'clock m.  W. H. McRae, Secretary and Treasurer R. Water-Works Co.

1871 The Rochester Directory, July 1, 1871
Page 291:  Rochester Water Works Company - Incorporated 1852; Capital $800,000.  Offices, Main street corner S. St. Paul.  President, Henry R. Selden; Vice President, A. J. Wilkin; Secretary and Treasurer, W. H. McRae; Chief Engineer, Daniel Marsh; Directors, Henry R. Selden, A. J. Wilkin, W. H. McRae, Edward M. Smith, F. L. Durand, John Williams, James L. Hathaway, William R. Utley, I.C. Winslow, George Shelton, Daniel Marsh.  Annual meeting in May.

1871 "Water Works Company - Legal Proceedings," Rochester Union & Advertiser, August 17, 1871, Page 2.
It is said that the President of the Water Works company was yesterday served with the necessary papers to immediately show cause in court why a receiver or superintendent should not be appointed in behalf of the plaintiffs, the Union Trust Co. of New York, which has loaned the company, it is said, the sum of $800,000, taking as property a mortgage on the property in part.  It is also said that the plaintiffs seek to have their mortgage cover the whole of the property of the company, right of way, pipes, reservoirs, &c.
If the application for the appointment of a superintendent is successful the Trust Company, it is reported, will at once proceed to complete the works.

1871 "Rochester Water-Works," Rochester Democrat and Chronicle, August 18, 1871, Page 4. 

1871 Proceedings of the Rochester Common Council 1871-72, Page 165, August 22, 1871.
LOCKPORT, Aug. 23d, 1871.
N. A. Stone, Esq., Alderman, Rochester, N. Y.:
In reply to your letter of inquiry, whether it is practicable to supply your city with water from Lake Ontario by the Holly system, I beg to state that this company has contract for machinery for the water supply and fire protection of Atlanta, Ga. The machinery will be set up four miles distant and 300 feet below the city. In the contract we guarantee to supply at that elevation and sixty feet in addition for household purposes. We also guarantee to throw fire streams direct from hydrants at the altitude of 300 feet above the pumps. This, you will observe, is substantially the requirement for Rochester, and what we can do in Atlanta we can most assuredly perform in your city.
The question of the cost of the machinery cannot be answered without more definite information than I possess upon many points which affect the question.
This company will be happy to respond to the call of Rochester for water, and meanwhile I am, very respectfully yours,
T. T. FLAGLER, President.

1871 "Rochester Water Works Company," Democrat and Chronicle, September 12, 1871, Page 4.  Report of receiver appointed to sell company.

1871 "The Water Works Company," Rochester Union & Advertiser, October 3, 1871, Page 2.  Bondholders taking steps to foreclose.

1871 Rochester Democrat and Chronicle, October 17, 1871, Page 4
Rochester Water Works.- The undersigned is authorized by the board and stockholders of the Rochester water works company to receive proposals from any responsible parties to complete the work required to convey water from Honeoye creek to the city of Rochester.
Proposals directed to the undersigned, at 29 North Fitzhugh street, Rochester.  Dr. D. M. Shipman

1871 The New York Times, October 27, 1871, Page 6.
The Union Trust Company of New-York vs. The Rochester Water Works Company.  Judgment of foreclosure and sale.

1871 The Brooklyn Daily Eagle, October 30, 1871, Page 4.
Baylis - Mr. B.H. Bayliss, of this city, has need a large professional plumb for a young lawyer.  We observe that he is referee of the Monroe County, N.Y., Supreme Court in the matter of the Rochester Water Works Company, which involves a matter of seven or eight hundred thousand dollars worth of bonds and other valuable property.

1871 Report by McRee Swift to the stockholders of the Rochester Water Works Company, December 2, 1871.  No copy of this report has been found, but excerpts were reprinted in the 1884 history by Tubbs.

1871 "The Water Question," Rochester Union & Advertiser, December 9, 1871, Page 2.

1871 Proceedings of the Rochester Common Council 1871-72, Page 258, December 12, 1871.
By Ald. Stone-Resolved, That the following citizens be requested to act as a committee: Isaac Butts, H. B. Knapp, William S. Thompson, D. W. Powers, George G. Cooper, P. Barry, William N. Sage, Henry Churchill, John H. Brewster, Thomas Parsons, whose duty shall be to investigate the present plan to supply the city with water, and especially to examine the Holley or any other system, which shall look to bringing the water from Lake Ontario, and they are hereby authorized to incur what expense may be necessary to present the matters in some tangible shape for the consideration of this Common Council, and a public meeting of our citizens, if they shall deem the same advisable.  Adopted.

1871 "Meeting of the Water Works Committee," Rochester Democrat and Chronicle, December 20, 1871, Page 4.

1871 Auburn Daily Bulletin, December 21, 1871, Page 1.
A Hint for the Water Works Co. - Rochester is agitating the question of introducing the Holly system of Water Works.

1872 Democrat and Chronicle, January 9, 1872, Page 3.
The Union Trust Company of New York vs. The Rochester Water Works Company.  Public auction on 12th day of December, 1871.  Postponed to 9th day of January, 1872.

1872 "Rochester Water Works," Rochester Union and Advertiser, January 9, 1872, Page 2.
Sold at auction to T. B. Rowe (New York) for $20,000.

1872 Democrat and Chronicle, January 10, 1872, Page 4.
Water Works Sold.-- A. K. Amsden knocked down the water works property yesterday to T. B. Rand of New York for $20,500.  This is cheap property.  The iron pipes would realize a much larger sum, not to say anything about the reservoir property.

1872 "Report of the Water Works Committee,"Proceedings of the Common Council, 1871-1872, Pages 286-290 , January 30, 1872.

1872 "Report of the Water Works Committee," Democrat and Chronicle, January 31, 1872, Page 4.

1872 "Report on Laminated Wood Pipe," February 10, 1872, Proceedings of the Rochester Common Council 1871-72, Page 353, March 26, 1872.

1872 Proceedings of the Rochester Common Council 1871-1872, Pages 334-335, March 12, 1872
By Ald. Stone - Resolved, That Issac Butts, Patrick Barry, D. W. Powers, John H. Brewster, Henry Churchill, W. S. Thompson, H. B. Knapp, Thomas Parsons, G. G. Cooper and William N. Sage be and are hereby authorized to organize a company, which shall be known as the Rochester Water Works Company, for the purpose of building and constructing water works for the supply of this city; and they are hereby permitted to lay their pipes in any street, lane, alley or public square, and this Common Council covenant and agree to pay them the same amount  for parks, public buildings and hydrants as what stipulated to the old Water Works Company, the said works to be built in accordance with the report submitted to this Board January 30, 1872.
And it is further stipulated that no money shall be paid by the Common Council to the said company until the introduction of water into the city buildings, and an ample supply for fire purposes.
And the Attorney is directed to prepare an act to be sent to the Legislature authorizing this board to raise all necessary funds for the above purposes.
Ald. Stone moved to table under the next regular meeting. Carried.

1872 Journal of the Assembly of the State of New York, Volume 1, Page 653, March 13, 1872.
Mr. G. D. Lord introduced a bill entitled "An act to supply the city of Rochester with pure and wholesome water," which was read the first time, and by unanimous consent was also read the second time, and referred to the committee on the affairs of cities.

1872 "The Water Question," Rochester Democrat and Chronicle, March 14, 1872, Page 4.

1872 Rochester Union & Advertiser, March 19, 1872, Page 2-5
Since the water question is before Rochester now, the UA has printed a table showing the use of soft and hard water in certain English and Scottish towns

1872 Proceedings of the Rochester Common Council 1871-1872, Page 348, March 20, 1872
By Ald. Stone - Resolved, That the Engineer or the Superintendent of the Rochester Water Works Company be requested to communicate to this Common Council, at its next meeting, their plans and purposes in reference to bringing water from Hemlock Lake, and how soon their intend to accomplish that end; and the Clerk of this Board is directed to furnish them with a copy of this resolution. Adopted.

1872 Rochester Union & Advertiser, March 23, 1872, Page 2-3
Letter to editor on probable way of conducting water from Lake Ontario to Rochester

1872 Rochester Union & Advertiser, March 23, 1872, Page 2-6
Item on preference of Genesee water to that of Honeoye and Hemlock Lakes

1872 Rochester Union & Advertiser, March 25, 1872, Page 2-1
Many hotels and boarding houses are now using Genesee river water

1872 Proceedings of the Rochester Common Council 1871-1872
Pages 352-353, March 26, 1872 March 25, 1872 letter from Lucien Birdseye, counsel for Thomas B. Rand, owner of the Rochester Water Works Company,

1872 Rochester Union & Advertiser, March 28, 1872, Page 2-1
Bill has been Introduced in the-Assembly to create a water commission

1872 Rochester Union & Advertiser, April 6, 1872, Page 2-5
Item on Genesee River as drinking water-

1872 "Hemlock Lake," Rochester Union and Advertiser, April 19, 1872, Page 2-5

1872 An act to supply the city of Rochester with pure and wholesome water.  April 27, 1872.

1872 "The Water Works Commission," Rochester Democrat and Chronicle, April 29, 1872, Page 4. Includes short biographical details of the five water commissioners appointed by the Mayor.

1872 Proceedings of the Rochester Common Council 1872-1873, Page 39, April 30, 1872.
MAYOR'S OFFICE, ROCHESTER, N. Y., April 29, 1872.
William F. Morrison, Esq., City Clerk:
Pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 387 of the Laws of 1872, passed April 27th, I do by virtue of the power thereby vested in me designate and appoint as Commissioners under said Act for supplying the city of Rochester with pure and wholesome water, Roswell Hart, for the period of five (5) years; Edward M. Smith, for the period of four (4) years; William H. Bowman, for the period of three (3) years; Charles C. Morse, for the period of two (2) years, and Gilman H. Perkins, for the period of one (1) year. Respectfully yours.
A. CARTER WILDER, Mayor.
Ordered received, filed and published.

1872 Rochester Union & Advertiser, May 6, 1872, Page 2-5
Water works commission send circular to Mayors of cities for information on water works

1872 Rochester Union and Advertiser, May 9, 1872, Page 2.
J. Nelson Tubbs engaged as engineer by the Water Commission.

1872 Democrat and Chronicle, May 11, 1872, Page 1.
The Legislature - Mr. Lord Introduced a bill to incorporate the Rochester water works company.

1872 "Water Works," Democrat and Chronicle, May 13, 1872, Page 4. Excursion of the new water commissioners to Smithtown, Hemlock Lake, etc.  The pressure burst the pipe in many places.

1872 An act to amend the several acts in relation to the city of Rochester. May 20, 1872. 
§ 22 to 27 relate to the water commissioners.
§ 26. The amount of the bonds of said city of Rochester, to be issued under the provisions of this act, shall not exceed the sum of three millions of dollars.

1872 Rochester Union & Advertiser, May 24, 1872, Page 2-2
Writ restraining Commission from further action obtained.

1872 Proceedings of the Rochester Common Council 1872-1873
Pages 69-70: May 28, 1872. Memorial of Thomas B. Rand proposing to enter into a water works contract.

1872 "Card from the Water Commissioners," Democrat and Chronicle, May 28, 1872, Page 4.

1872 "Take Care, Gentlemen," Democrat and Chronicle, May 29, 1872, Page 4.  Cautions about dealing with the water works company.

1872 "A title no clearer than the water," Democrat and Chronicle, May 30, 1872, Page 4.  Responds to claim by Thomas B. Rand that he has clear title to the old water works company.

1872 Proceedings of the Rochester Common Council 1872-1873
Page 80:  June 4, 1872.  The President presented an injunction issued by Judge Jerome Fuller, on complaint of the Water Works Commission.

1872 "Water works injunction," Democrat and Chronicle, June 5, 1872, Page 4.  Includes details of the injunction.

1872 "Judge Fuller dissolves injunction restraining water commissioners," Democrat and Chronicle, June 5, 1872, Page 4.

1872 Proceedings of the Rochester Common Council 1872-1873
Pages 86-90:  June 11, 1872.  "Draft water supply contract between T. B. Rand & Co. and the City of Rochester," June 10, 1872.

1872 Democrat and Chronicle, June 12, 1872, Page 4.
In the general term of the supreme court now being held in Buffalo an application to modify the injunction against the water works commissioners was modified yesterday to allowing the latter to make surveys, etc., in fact, they are allowed to do everything except issue bonds.

1872 "The Proposed Water Contract with T. B. Rand," Democrat and Chronicle, June 17, 1872, Page 4. | Part 2 |

1872 Rochester Union & Advertiser, June 27, 1872, Page 2-2
Article on drinking water and sources for it about Rochester

1872 The Rochester Directory containing a General Directory of the Citizens, for the year commencing July 1, 1872.

1872 Proceedings of the Rochester Common Council 1872-1873
Page 125:  July 23, 1872  "Proposal of T. B. Rand & Co. to supply water for fire purposes from existing pipes and hydrants." 

1872 Proceedings of the Rochester Common Council 1872-1873
Pages 138-139:  July 30, 1872.  "Draft contract between Charles H. Simpkins, agent of T. B. Rand & Co. and the City of Rochester, to supply water for fire from existing pipes and hydrants," Includes a list of included pipes and hydrants that were installed by the Rochester Water Works Company.

1872 "Water for Fire Purposes," Democrat and Chronicle, August 2, 1872, Page 4.

1872 "Rochester Water Pipe for Salt Lake," Rochester Union & Advertiser, August 22, 1872, Page 3.
Mr. T. McKean in town, having contracted with the Rochester Laminated Pipe and Package Company for 21,000 feet of their Laminated Wood Pipe.

1872 Report to the Water Commissioners on the Chemical and Sanitary Quality of the Various Sources of Water Supply proposed for the City of Rochester, N. Y., September 2, 1872, by Samuel A. Lattimore, Professor of Chemistry in the University of Rochester.

1872 Rochester Union & Advertiser, September 10, 1872, Page 2-2
Union and Advertiser favors Holly Company Machinery; shows defects of present water supply

1872 "Communication from Water Works Committee," Democrat and Chronicle, September 13, 1872, Page 4.  Pointed out that contract with water works company expired two years ago and that the existing pipes and hydrants are not in a condition to hold water and are poorly connected.

1872 "The Assembly Question," Democrat and Chronicle, October 31, 1872, Page 4.
Citizen's Meeting at City Hall. Remarks of Chauncey Perry and John Van Voorhis. Anti-Commission Resolutions. The Meeting Broken Up in Disorder by the Partisans of George D. Lord.  Deafening Medley of Yells, Groans, Hisses, Shouts and Cries.
John Van Voorhis described how Lord would end up being the contractor on the water works and fleece the city taxpayers. 

1872 Rochester Union & Advertiser, November 1, 1872, Page 2-5
Commissioner's indication of their plans and work done published

1872 Report of the Board of Water Commissioners, of the city of Rochester, to the mayor of the city of Rochester made Nov. 15, 1872. Includes Report of the Chief Engineer, J. Nelson Tubbs, October 31, 1872. | another copy (pdf) | and another copy |

1872 "Our Water Supply," Democrat and Chronicle, November 21, 1872, Page 4.

1872 "Legal Intelligence," Daily Albany Argus, December 13, 1872, Page 2.
In Court of Appeals.  Thursday, December 12.  The city of Rochester appt. agst Roswell Hart et al. respts.

1872 George  H. Mumford and  George J. Whitney, as Trustee of the Bondholders of the Rochester Water Works Company, Respondent, vs. The Union Trust Company of New York, Appellant, Case on Appeal, records and briefs | pdf |

1872 Proceedings of the Rochester Common Council 1872-1873
Pages 264-267:  Common Council meeting, December 31, 1872.  Report of the Council Sub-Committee, appointed to examine and report upon Water-Works, December 30, 1872.
Strongly recommends that water works be built and owned by a private company.
Thos. C. Montgomery, A. Stern, Henry T. Rogers, Jesse Shepherd.

1873 "The Water Question - What Points are Settled and What Debatable?" letter by a Member of the Old Committee, Rochester Democrat and Chronicle, January 7, 1873, Page 4.

1873 "Water," Rochester Democrat and Chronicle, January 7, 1873, Page 4.
Response to the above letter.

1873 Journal of the Assembly of the State of New York, Volume 1, Page 29, January 8, 1873.
Mr. Fish ... introduced a bill entitled "An act to repeal an act entitled 'An act to supply the city of Rochester with pure and wholesome water,' passed April 27, 1872," which was read the first time, and by unanimous consent was also read the second time, and referred to the committee on the affairs of cities."

1873 "Rochester Water Company," New York World, January 15, 1873, Page 8.
Mr. D.P. Wood, of the Twenty-second district, introduced a bill to incorporate the Rochester Water Company, with James C. Ayer, Joseph H. Ely, H.C.Southwick and others as directors, the capital stock of the company to be $1,000,000, with the privilege of increasing it to $3,000,000, to be raised by the sale of shares at $100 each. Referred to the Committee on Cities.

1873 The City of Rochester, Appellant, v. Roswell Hart, et al., Respondents, 52 N.Y. 621, January 21, 1873.  Court of Appeals of the State of New York

1873 "The Water Works Commission Sustained," Democrat and Chronicle, January 22, 1873, Page 4.

1873 "Water Works Commission," Democrat and Chronicle, January 25, 1873, Page 4. | part 2 |
Opinion of Judge Peckham in the Court of Appeals Decision, in Favor of the Commissioners.

1873 "The Water Works Question," Democrat and Chronicle, February 5, 1873, Page 2.

1873 "The New Member of the Water Commission," Democrat and Chronicle, February 7, 1873, Page 2.
Pliny M. Bromley appointed to replaced Edward M. Smith, resigned.

1873 "Anti-Commission Meeting," Democrat and Chronicle, February 18, 1873, Page 4.

1873 Daily Albany Argus, February 20, 1873, Page 2.
Legislature of New York. Bills introduced. Mr. Fish, to incorporate the Rochester Water Works Company.

1873 "A Plain Statement of the Water Question," Democrat and Chronicle, March 6, 1873, Page 4.

1873 "Rochester Board of Water Commissioners Request for Proposals", Democrat and Chronicle, March 10, 1873, Page 1.

1873 "Water Power Wanted," Democrat and Chronicle, March 13, 1873, Page 4.
Water power on one of the mill races in this city for the purpose of operating the Holly system of water works.

1873 "Petition to the Board of Water Commissioners of the City of Rochester," Democrat and Chronicle, March 17, 1873, Page 4.

1873 "The Spectator on raising fire insurance rates," Democrat and Chronicle, March 21, 1873, Page 2.

1873 Democrat and Chronicle, March 24, 1873, Page 4.
The water works  commissioners, by their counsel, William F. Cogswell, have made a motion in the United States supreme court to discharge the writ of error granted in behalf of the city, represented by the city attorney. The hearing of arguments on this motion has been set down for April 4th. A motion for an injunction upon the commission has been made by City Attorney Shepherd, and this will be argued and decided at the same time.

1873 Proceedings of the Rochester Common Council 1872-73
Page 331:  April 1, 1873 Proposed Bill to be submitted to the legislature- An act to provide for submitting the repeal of Chapters 387 and 771 of the Laws of 1872 to the electors of the city of Rochester.

1873 "Citizens' Association," Democrat and Chronicle, April 7, 1873, Page 4.

1873 "The Contract Awarded for the Construction of Water Works--Abstract of the Specifications and Contracts," Democrat and Chronicle, April 14, 1873, Page 4.  Contract award to James McDonald, Wellsboro Falls, Essex County.

1873 "Rochester Water Works," Daily Albany Argus, April 14, 1873, Page 2.
The contract for the building of water works for the city of Rochester has been let, and the name of the contractor is not George D. Lord.  List of bidders.

1873 "United States Supreme Court," Daily Morning Chronicle (Washington, D.C.), April 19, 1873, Page 4.
Friday, April 18, 1873.  On motion of Mr. J. C. Cochrane, Jesse Shepherd, Esq., of Rochester, N. Y. was admitted to practice as an attorney and counselor in this court.
No. 659.  The City of Rochester, plaintiff in error, vs. Roswell Hart et al. The motion to dismiss this cause was submitted on printed arguments by Mr. W. F. Cogswell, in support of the same, and by Mr. James C. Cochrane in opposition, there go.
No. 659.  The City of Rochester, plaintiff in error, vs. Roswell Hart et al. The motion for an injunction in this cause was argued by Mr. James C. Cochran in support of the same, and by Mr. W. F. Cogswell in opposition thereto.

1873 "United States Supreme Court," Daily Morning Chronicle (Washington, D.C.), May 2, 1873, Page 4.
Thursday, May 1. No. 659.  The City of Rochester, plaintiff in error, vs. Roswell Hart et al.  In error to the Supreme Court of the State of New York.  Mr. Chief Justice Case announced the decision of the court, denying the motion for injunction in this cause, and continuing the motion to dismiss until next term.

1873 "Death of Daniel Marsh," Rochester Union and Advertiser, May 19, 1873, Page 2.
An old citizen of Rochester, Daniel Marsh, died; on Saturday at his residence on South Avenue at the age of 73 years. In the earlier part of his life Mr. Marsh was a school teacher and later a civil engineer, at times employed on the canals and railroads. In 1856 he was City Surveyor.  For a number of years he was connected with the Rochester Water Work Company, when the wooden pipes were laid by Mr. Easton. He was in feeble health for months before his death.  Mr. Marsh was an honorable man and respected by his fellow citizens.

1873 Proceedings of the Common Council of the City of Rochester 1873-74
Page 32: May 20, 1873.  The legal proceedings now pending in the United States Court between the city of Rochester and the Water Commissioners can be productive of but one result -- an increased expenditure for useless litigation; and I therefore respectfully recommend that the City Attorney be instructed to withdraw and discontinue all pending proceedings.  A. C. Wilder, Mayor, May 8, 1873.
Council adopted a resolution to that effect by a vote of 16-11.

1873 "Common Council," Democrat and Chronicle, May 21, 1873, Page 4.
Resolution Adopted to Discontinue the Litigation Against the Water Commissioners.

1873 Proceedings of the Common Council of the City of Rochester 1873-74
Page 38: May 23, 1873.  Special meeting requested by eight Aldermen.  Reconsideration of the vote on the resolution ordering the discontinuance of the suit now pending in the Supreme Court of the United States, between the City of Rochester, plaintiff in error, and Roswell Hart and others, defendants in error.  Carried by a vote of 14-12.

1873 "The Mains of the old Water Works Company," Democrat and Chronicle, May 28, 1873, Page 4.

1873 Proceedings of the Common Council of the City of Rochester 1873-74
Page 44: June 3, 1873.  Gentlemen:  Having recommended and approved the action of your honorable body in ordering a discontinuance of the suit pending before the United States Court between the City of Rochester and the Water Commission, the resolution adopted by the Common Council, May 23d, 1873, considering its first action is hereby returned without my approval.  A. Carter Wilder, Mayor.

1873 Democrat and Chronicle, June 4, 1873, Page 4.
Work was begun yesterday on the lot near the foot of Brown's race, purchased by the board of water commissioners, for the erection of Holley water works. A building will be forthwith erected for the machinery for conveying water from the river through the city for fire purposes. This machinery is now in process of making at the works of the Holley company at Lockport. George H. Thompson & Co. have the management of the matter, and it will doubtless be pushed forward to a speedy completion.

1873 An act to define and restrict the powers of the board of water commissioners of the city of Rochester.  June 13, 1873.

1873 "Notice to Laborers," Democrat and Chronicle, June 30, 1873, Page 1.
I will pay two dollars for ten hours' work for good men from and including July 1, 1873, on the reservoir in the Town of Rush, ten miles south of Rochester.  Two Hundred and Fifty Good Men Wanted.  Pay days twice a month.  Jas. McDonald, Rochester Water Works Contractor.

1873 Proceedings of the Rochester Common Council 1873-1874
Pages 64-66:  July 7, 1873.  Report of the Board of Water Commissioners," July 1, 1873,  | Also printed in Democrat and Chronicle, July 7, 1873, Page 3.|

1873 "Rochester Water Company," Rochester Union and Advertiser, August 20, 1873, Page 2.
Thomas S. Rand purchased a corporation under mortgage; sells its franchises, privileges easements rights and liberties (of the Old Water Co.) and formed the Rochester Water Co. with a capital of $800,000.  His associates are Edwin Hoyt, Wm. G. Lambert, Isaac H. Knox, Lucien Blrdseye, John P. Roberts, H. B. Clafflin, Charles H. Simpkins, Wm. A. Parke, C. F. Skinner, and Fred A. Whittlesey.

1873 "The Water Pipe Question," Rochester Union & Advertiser, August 22, 1873, Page 2.  These pipes were patented in 1869 and widely advertised for a short time.  The material was a lower grade of Britannia metal.  Despite its claims, it was found to cause lead poisoning in Sacramento in 1872, which was reported in the Boston Journal of Science.

1873 Rochester Union and Advertiser, August 23, 1873, Page 2.
The first street pipe was laid this morning by the Water Works commission.  It was laid at Goodman Street on Monroe Avenue, beginning at the city line and running citywards on the avenue.  The pipe will be laid ahead of the improvement now in progress.

1873 "The Rochester Water Works.  A Review of the Progress of the Work -- Everything Satisfactory," Rochester Union and Advertiser, August 23, 1873, Page 2.

1873 "The Water-Works Ring," Rochester Democrat and Chronicle, October 23, 1873, Page 2.
What is the commission?  We answer that it is owned, body and bones, by George D. Lord. 

1873 "The Defence," Democrat and Chronicle, October 27, 1873, Page 2.
The water-works commission has published no less than two separate documents in its own defence.

1873 "The Democrat's Water Works Gabble,"  Rochester Union and Advertiser, October 27, 1873, Page 3.
The Democrat charges that Water Works Commissioners are merely the tools of Lord, who is superintendent for the contractor, Mr. MacDonald.

1873 "Has the Water Commission Violated the Law?" Democrat and Chronicle, October 29, 1873, Page 2.

1873 "The Water Works Bonds," Democrat and Chronicle, October 30, 1873, Page 2.

1873 "The Holly Water Works Company," Democrat and Chronicle, December 30, 1873, Page 4. | Part 2 |
What is being done toward testing the pipes.  A defective main discovered.

1873 Sidney A. Newman v. Francis X. Beckwith  Case on Appeal, John Van Voorhis, Quincy Van Voorhis and Walter L. Hyde against Alexander Easton.  | pdf |

1873 First annual report of the Board of Water Commissioners of the city of Rochester to the Common Council made January 1st, 1874.  Includes Supplementary Report of the Chief Engineer, February 20, 1874, describing the test of the Holly Water Works.
Pages 23-28:  Discussion of wrought iron pipe and recommendation for the Hemlock conduit,  Such pipe had been successfully used in San Francisco and Virginia City. 

1874 Annual Report of the American institute of the City of New York for the Year 1873
Pages 543-544: The Rochester Water Works.  These works, constructed on the system of Birdsall Holly, an inventor, residing in Lockport, N. Y., were recently subjected to an unprecedented test, and proved completely efficient. The machinery consists of two sets of pumping engines, each embracing four double acting cylinders 9 by 24 inches, and each set so arranged as to suck and discharge at eight successive and equal points in each revolution, thus giving uniformity to the flow of water. These pumps which supply the mains for ordinary use are driven by the turbine wheels under a pressure due to a height of 90 feet. The water is brought to the city by an aqueduct from Hamlock lake. There are also four double acting pumping engines with cylinders 10¼-by 24 inches, a 150 horse Holly rotary engine and two Holly rotary pumps. The capacity of all is about 4,000,000 gallons per hour in the street mains during the 24 hours, and 3,000,000 gallons can be delivered extra, in the same time, by means of the steam machinery. During the trial these works succeeded in throwing eight large streams at once, to an average height of 135 feet. One two inch stream was thrown 220 feet; one four inch stream was thrown 465 feet; one three inch stream reached an altitude of 285; a four inch stream reached the height of 287½ feet, and a vertical five inch stream was thrown 250½ and a vertical five inch stream was thrown 250½ feet. These are astounding results, but it is evident that these large streams would not be available in conflagrations, for the current would demolish an ordinary building. The practical use of the 30 smaller streams thrown at once to the height of 135 feet, is beyond question, and the city of Rochester is supplied with mechanical safeguards against fire which probably are not equaled in efficiency by the water-works of any other city.
Mr. John W. Sutton — The great fault of the Holly system seems to me to be this: it is always attached to the mains, of course, and the supply for the buildings is taken out of the same mains. Consider the pressure upon the plumbing work when the stream can be thrown 400 feet. The system may be excellent for a fire, but is a poor system where buildings a,re to be supplied with water at the same time.
The President — We have in Jersey City a pressure of over 100 feet head of water always. The pressure can be lowered by the hydrants at any time, but it can be easily raised.
Mr. Hudson — We must remember that all the plumbing of the city must be of such a character as to sustain the highest pressure that can be used, or it may give way.

1874 "The Holly Water Works at Rochester," Lockport Daily Journal, January 2, 1874, Page 2.

1874 "Our Clyde Letter," Rochester Democrat and Chronicle, January 14, 1874, Page 3.
Success of the Rochester water works.

1874 Rochester Union & Advertiser, February 5, 1874, Page 2-7
Programme of the public exhibition of Holly power

1874 Programme of public exhibition of the Holly system water works at Rochester, N.Y., to take place Wednesday, February 18th, 1874.

1874 "Water," Rochester Democrat and Chronicle, February 19, 1874, Page 4. | also here pdf |
Exhibition of the Holly Works.

1874 "Another Triumph.," Lockport Daily Journal, February 19, 1874, Page 4.
The Holly Water Works Test at Rochester Yesterday.

1874 "Cost of the Holly Water Works," by J. Nelson Tubbs, Rochester Democrat and Chronicle, March 2, 1874, Page 4.

1874 Proceedings of the Common Council of the City of Rochester 1873-74
Page 233: March 31st, 1874.  Annual Report of the City Attorney of the several causes now at issue and pending in the several courts of the State of New York and the United States.
In the Supreme Court of the United States: The City of Rochester, Plaintiff in Error, ag't Roswell Hart, et al.  This is an action against the Board of Water Commissioners of the City of Rochester in Error, to the Supreme Court of the State of New York.

1874 Rules, regulations and water rates for Rochester Water Works, May 1, 1874.

1874 Buffalo Evening Courier and Republic, June 12, 1874, Page
The laborers on the Rochester water-works struck Wednesday for an increase of  pay, the wages being $1 and $1.25.  New men were engaged, and the strikers made such demonstrations that the police were called out in force and succeeded, after the arrest of several of the more demonstrative, in preventing serious results.

1874 Troy Times, June 18, 1874, Page 1.
A gang of laborers on the Rochester water works struck on Wednesday for higher wages, and behaved in a turbulent manner, driving other men from their employment, etc. The result is that the four ringleaders are in the penitentiary for ten days each, and the rest of the men are working at their old rate of wages.

1874 An act to amend the several acts in relation to the city of Rochester.  June 26, 1874
§ 3. The board of water commissioners of the city of Rochester is hereby authorized to issue bonds for the construction of water-works for said city to an amount not exceeding three millions of dollars.

1874 Proceedings of the Common Council of the City of Rochester, 1874-5
Page 63: June 16, 1874.  By Ald. Bower - Resolved, that the suit of the City of Rochester against Roswell Hart and others, now pending in the Supreme Court of the United States, be and it hereby is discontinued; and the City Attorney and the attorney of record for the city in that suit are directed to execute a discontinuance of the suit, and to allow it to be dismissed from the docket or the judgment below affirmed.  Adopted by the following vote 14-11.

1874 Rochester Directory for the year commending July 1, 1874.
Pages 399-400:  Water Rates

1874 Proceedings of the Common Council of the City of Rochester 1874-75
Page 74-75: July 14, 1874.  Gentlemen:  The Law Committee, to whom was referred the accounts of J. C. Cochrane, amounting to $4,500, for services as attorney and counsel in the Supreme Court, Court of Appeals, and Supreme Court of the United States, in the case of the City of Rochester against Roswell Hart and others, would respectfully report that, from information secured by us, we find that Jesse Sheppard, late City Attorney, was authorized to secure the services of Mr. Cochrane in this suit. 
The items in Mr. Cochrane's bill are herewith presented, amounting to $4,500.  Your committee suggested the sum of $2,500; that would probably be satisfactory to this Board.  Mr. Cochrane, in all of the negotiations between us, has manifested a spirit of conciliation, and finally indicated to us that, although he regarded the sum unreasonably small, but as he did not wish any controversy on the subject, he would be governed by the opinion of the Law Committee.

1874 "In Common Council," Rochester Democrat and Chronicle, August 28, 1874, Page 3.
Report of Water Commissioners, July 1, 1874. | also here |

1874 Newman v. Beckwith, 61 N.Y. 205, September 5, 1874, Court of Appeals of the State of New York. | Records and Briefs |  Case involving Alexander Easton and Rochester Water Works Company. 

1874 Horner's Rochester city guide and encyclopedia of useful knowledge.
Holly Water Works - This amount of power is, under ordinary circumstances, amply sufficient, but, to provide against the contingency of low wa­ter or accidents, a number of steam boilers are held in readiness to supply any deficiency in the water power. The boilers are connected with engines, thereby avoiding any delay in using them when re­quired. A rotary steam engine of 150 horsepower also fo1ms part of the available power; the combined power of the steam engines is 450 horsepower, their pumping capacity being guaranteed to be no less than 3,000,000 gallons in twenty-four hours. The amount of water pipe already laid is about 15 miles, and the work of laying pipe is still in progress.

1874 Report of the Board of Water Commissioners of the city of Rochester to the Common Council of the city of Rochester, January 1st, 1875 | also here |

1875 An act supplementary to an act passed May twentieth, eighteen hundred and seventy-two, entitled "An act to amend the several acts relating to the city of Rochester."  February 26, 1875

1875 An act to amend an act entitled "An act to amend the several acts relating to the city of Rochester," passed May twentieth, eighteen hundred and seventy-two.  March 3, 1875

1875 "The Tweeds of Rochester," New York Times, March 29, 1875, Page 1. | also here |
"Old Jarve" and "George the Silent" - The Lord Family as Financiers and Legislators - The Lord Water Works and Public Works Boards - A Swift Law Swiftly Executed - Silencing Opposition - The Initiated Bribed and the Honest Terrified - Bonds Issued in Excess of the Authorized Amount and Sold Contrary to Law - The Interest Paid From the Proceeds of the Sale to Avert the Rage of Outraged Taxpayers - Swindling in the Water Works Contracts - George D. Lord, the Real Contractor, Signing On as the "Clerk" of the Pretended Contractor.  The Rochester Water-Works - A Remarkable Record.  Heading Off Outside Capitalists.  Swift Action on the New Law. Public Estimate of the Scheme.  Creation of a Board of Public Works.  Stifling the Voice of the Citizens.  How the "Commission" used their Power. How George "The Silent" Works.  A Coat of Whitewash.  Paying the Interest from Proceeds of the Sales of the Bonds. Unblushing Fraud in Contracting.

1875 "The Rochester Lords," The New York Times, April 1, 1875, Page 7.  | also here |
Some of the ways by which they have controlled the city.  George the Silent's method of working.  Peter B. Sweeney's Prototype.  The business men waking up.  Enough taxation the waterworks will inflict on the city.  Interesting items from the books of Commissioners.  The M'Donald contract to be thoroughly examined.

1875 "Rochester and Her Lords," The Syracuse Daily Journal, April 2, 1875, Page 1.
How the city debt was increased six-fold.
Rochester is a burdened city.  The Lord have captured it and are consumers its substance.  Since the canal exposures Rochester adds its mite, which is not by any means small, to expose the Lords.  A Rochester correspondent of the New York Times says: --
"Business men say that on the advent of Jarvis Lord to the State Senate from this District, the debt of the city of Rochester than less than $1,000,000i, and being gradually paid.  Within the past three years by means of Lord's commission bills, and certain railroad schemes in which he was interested, and legislation procured by him, the debt of the city has increased to between $5,000,000 and $6,000,000 on a total assessed valuation of about $14,000,000.  At a recent meeting of the common council it was publicly stated by an alderman that if the city put into its tax levy for this year a sum sufficient to pay the interest maturing now and that ultimately due, it would increase last year's levy by seventy per cent., making the rate instead of five year nine per cent. of the entire valuation of the city property, exclusive of the county and State tax.  The water works swindle is the most exasperating of the Lord rascalities to the people."  
"It seems that George Lord got the water works contract, the estimates for works being entirely erroneous.  The Lord know where the errors were and bid accordingly.  The engineer's plans were then changed and the Lord are now reaping the advantage.  Here is an instance.  A man named McDonald was the agent of George Lord and arranged matters.
"The specifications called for 4,000,000 of hard-burned brick laid for conduit.  McDonald bid $1 per thousand; Randolph, Wood & Co., not canal contractors, $23 a thousand.  This discrepancy is understood when it is known that Lord's man offered $1 for material he knew the engineer has resolved not to use, while Wood & Co. thought they would have to furnish this very expensive brick.  This one item in the price made a difference in the bid of $84,000 in favor of McDonald, and enabled him to set a high price on material for which the specification did not call largely, but which was afterwards used.  For instance: -- Pipe made of boiler iron, for which there was no specification at all, and which pipes costs, it is estimated, at least $400,000 or $500,000 more than the brick conduit at Lord's prices, was substituted for it after the award was made on the bid for brick"

1875 "The Rochester Ring," New York Times, April 3, 1875, Page 1.  | also here |
Some of the Personal Following of the Lords.  Actions of the Citizens of Rochester in Regard to the Recent Exposure -- The Local Press Denounce the Ring -- Tubbs, the Engineer -- His Career

1875 "Appointment of Water Commissioner," Democrat and Chronicle, April 30, 1875, Page 4.
William H. Bowman term expired, James C. Cochrane appointed.

1875 George J. Whitney, Surviving Trustee, etc., Respondent, v. The Union Trust Company of New York, Impleaded, etc. Appellant. May 29, 1875, 65 N. Y. 576,  Court of Appeals of the State of New York, Action to foreclose a mortgage of the Rochester Water-works Company.

1875 An act appointing commissioners to examine the accounts, acts and proceedings of the board of water commissioners of the city of Rochester, for constructing water-works for said city, and also the commissioners appointed to fix upon the site for a city hall and erection of a building, to be used as such, thereon in the city of Rochester.  June 9, 1875

1875 An act in relation to the care, custody and management of the water-works of the city of Rochester, and to regulate the collection of water rents in said city.  June 9, 1875

1875 An act to amend chapter three hundred and eighty-seven of the laws of eighteen hundred and seventy-two, entitled "An act to supply the city of Rochester with pure and wholesome water."  June 15, 1875

1875 "Supreme Court," The New York Times, June 26, 1875, Page 6.
George J. Whitney, as surviving Trustees for the bondholders of the Rochester Water-Works Company, against the Rochester Water-Works Company, the Union Trust Company of New-York, and others.

1875 "Water Works Scrutiny," The Rochester Evening Express, July 1, 1875, Page 2.
The Commissioners Commence Business. 

1875 "Our Water Works," The Rochester Evening Express, July 2, 1875, Page 2.
Continuation of the investigation.  Testimony of Treasurer Williams, Ex-Mayor Wilder, Mayor Clarkson, and Roswell Hart.  No One Knows Anything About it.  Where the Returned Bonds Destroyed?

1875 "Water Works," The Rochester Evening Express, July 3, 1875, Page 2.
Continuation of the investigation. Testimony of J. Nelson Tubbs, who favored a wrought-iron conduit rather than brick.

1875 "Water Works," The Rochester Evening Express, July 7, 1875, Page 2.
Continuation of the investigation.  Testimony of Engineer Tubbs and James E. Booth.

1875 "Water Works," The Rochester Evening Express, July 8, 1875, Page 2.
The investigation Continued.

1875 "Water Works Investigation," The Rochester Evening Express, July 9, 1875, Page 2.
The investigation continued.

1875 "Water Works Investigation," The Rochester Evening Express, July 10, 1875, Page 2.

1875 "The Water Works Investigation," Letter by Tax Payer, The Rochester Evening Express, July 12, 1875, Page 2.
The investigation continued.

1875 "The Water Works -- Decision of Special Term," Rochester Democrat and Chronicle, July 13, 1875, Page 4.
Right of way of the Rochester Water Company.

1875 "Water Works," The Rochester Evening Express, July 13, 1875, Page 2.
The investigation continued.

1875 "Rochester Water Works," Letter by A Citizen. The Rochester Evening Express, July 13, 1875, Page 2.

1875 "Hemlock's Water," The Rochester Evening Express, July 16, 1875, Page 2.
Visit of Investigators.  Inspection of the Reservoirs.  What the Reporter Saw, Heard and Thought of the Whole Matter.  Doubts Respecting Supply, &c.

1875 "Water Works Inquiry," The Rochester Evening Express, July 17, 1875, Page 2.
Further Account of the Visit to the Lake.  The Quicksand Theory Exploded.  The Condition of the Wrought Iron Conduit.  The Use of Inferior Wood.  The Supply Question.

1875 "Water Works," The Rochester Evening Express, July 19, 1875, Page 2.
The Investigation Continued - Testimony of George D. Lord.

1875 "Water Works Investigation," The Rochester Evening Express, July 20, 1875, Page 2.
George the Silent Fails to Produce the Assignment of McDonald.  A Copy Obtained through Benj. G. Clark.  The Document in Full.

1875 "Water Works Investigation," The Rochester Evening Express, July 21, 1875, Page 2.
Geo. D. Lord Again on the Stand - He Finally Produces McDonald's Assignment of the Contract - Flat Denials of Corrupt Interest of the Water Commissioners or Engineers.

1875 "Water Works Investigation," The Rochester Evening Express, July 22, 1875, Page 2.
The Hitherto Mythical McDonald Produced at Last.  His Little Arrangement With George Lord.  About That Brick Conduit.

1875 "Water Works Investigation," The Rochester Evening Express, July 23, 1875, Page 2.

1875 "Water Works Investigation," The Rochester Evening Express, July 24, 1875, Page 2.

1875 "Rochester Water Works," Letter from Observer, The Rochester Evening Express, July 24, 1875, Page 2.
Some Queer Testimony and Some Positive Facts.

1875 "Water Works Investigation," The Rochester Evening Express, July 26, 1875, Page 2.

1875 "Water Works Investigation," The Rochester Evening Express, July 27, 1875, Page 2.

1875 "Water Works Investigation," The Rochester Evening Express, July 28, 1875, Page 2.

1875 "Water Works Investigation," The Rochester Evening Express, July 29, 1875, Page 2.
Report of Mr. Powell, the Engineer for the Investigating Commissioners - Conclusion of the Investigation - Affairs at the City Hall Taken Up This Morning.

1875 "Rochester Water Works," The Public, 8:398 (August 2, 1875)
In the suit of the surviving trustee for the bondholders of the Rochester Water Works company against the company, the Union Trust Co, et al., the referee gives notice that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure and sale rendered at Rochester May 29, 1872, the holders of any bonds or coupons (the same issued about March I, 1867, and secured by a mortgage now outstanding issued to the plaintiff and Geo. H. Mumford) are required to produce the said bonds or coupons, with proof of ownership, before said referee (Daniel B. Beach) at his offices, 105 Powers Block, in Rochester, between 9 A. M. and 5 P. M. August 25 next. Also, that all persons not presenting or proving such bonds and coupons before him, as such referee, within the time limited in this notice, will be precluded from sharing in the proceeds of the sale of the mortgaged premises in said judgments decreed, and from any interest therein.

1875 "The Water Works Investigation," The Rochester Evening Express, August 5, 1875, Page 2.

1875 "Water Works Investigation," The Rochester Evening Express, August 9, 1875, Page 2.
Examination of Bowman, the Bully of the Water Works.
By Mr. Filon--Mr. Charles P. Skinner came to me in a peculiar way one time while riding on the Erie railway; he  said the Commissioners might make $25,000 by buying out the old water works; they wanted about $l75,000 or $200,000; I told him 1 would not consent to such purchase; did not know at the time that he was an authorized agent competent to sell out the old water works.

1875 "Water Works Investigation," letter by Fair Play, The Rochester Evening Express, August 9, 1875, Page 2.
$4,500,000 Bonds Brought to Light - A Review of the Testimony, Giving Prominence to Special Points.  Chapter I

1875 "Rochester Water Works," letter by Fair Play, The Rochester Evening Express, August 10, 1875, Page 2.
Chapter II.

1875 "Rochester Water Works. The Report of the Examining Committee," Democrat and Chronicle, August 16, 1875, Page 3.  | also here | pdf |
There has been very little evidence produced before us to show that the work connected with the Rochester water works has not been skillfully and faithfully done.

1875 "Is the McDonald-Lord Contract Void?" The Rochester Evening Express, August 17, 1875, Page 2.

1875 "The Verbatim Testimony of George D. Lord Before the Water Works Investigating Committee, July 19, 1875," The Rochester Evening Express, August 18, 1875, Page 2.

1875 "The Verbatim Testimony of George D. Lord Continued," The Rochester Evening Express, August 19, 1875, Page 2.

1875 "The Verbatim Testimony of George D. Lord Continued," The Rochester Evening Express, August 20, 1875, Page 2.

1875 "The Verbatim Testimony of George D. Lord Continued," The Rochester Evening Express, August 23, 1875, Page 2.

1875 "The Verbatim Testimony of George D. Lord Continued," The Rochester Evening Express, August 24, 1875, Page 2.

1875 "The Verbatim Testimony of George D. Lord Continued," The Rochester Evening Express, August 25, 1875, Page 2.

1875 "The Verbatim Testimony of George D. Lord Continued," The Rochester Evening Express, August 26, 1875, Page 2.

1875 "The Verbatim Testimony of James McDonald, 'Contractor for the Rochester Water Works'," The Rochester Evening Express, August 27, 1875, Page 2.

1875 "Nemesis!," The Rochester Evening Express, August 28, 1875, Page 2.
Arrest of Geo. D. Lord.  Charge of Bribery in the Legislature.

1875 "The Champion White-Washers," The Rochester Evening Express, August 29, 1875, Page 2.
Rochester Union and Advertiser

1875 "The Verbatim Testimony of George D. Lord Continued," The Rochester Evening Express, August 29, 1875, Page 2.

1875 "From Hemlock Lake," The Rochester Evening Express, September 6, 1875, Page 2.
The Old Water Works Company's Land - The Route of the New Works - Progress of the Work - The Trench at the Outlet - Pipe Laying - The Way the Work is Being Done - Personalities, etc.
Some years ago the old Water Works Company bought of Mr. Jacques a strip of land from the lake down through his  farm, on which they made a small down payment, and when they failed he expected the land would come back into his hands; but lately they have paid up the balance, as part of the plan for stopping the city from taking  water from tho lake. [See June 20, 1876 court decision below.]

1875 "The Lord Redivivus. The Water Works Investigation - Verbatim Testimony of George D. Lord Concluded," The Rochester Evening Express, September 6, 1875, Page 2.

1875 "Evident Complicity," The Rochester Evening Express, September 7, 1875, Page 2.
Testimony of J. Nelson Tubbs.   There has been more corruption and fraud perpetuated under this "enlargement of the water supply pipes," and "additional work in the city," then can be atoned for in a hundred years.

1875 The Hartford Daily Courant, September 13, 1875, Page 2.  | Also in The Baltimore Underwriter, 14:186 (September 16, 1875)
Reviewing the investigation of frauds in connection with the Rochester water works, in which George D. Lord is implicated, the Rochester Express thinks it has disclosed more corruption "than can be atoned for in the next hundred years."

1875 "Prince of Rochester," The World (New York, New York), September 25, 1875, Page 1.
A lively sketch of the fallen House of Lord.

1875 "George D. Lord, of the Canal Ring," Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper, 41:104 (October 23, 1875) | includes portrait of George D. Lord |

1876 In the matter of the application of the water commissioners of Rochester to acquire title to lands of the Rochester Water Company; In the matter of the application of the Rochester Water Company to change the route adopted by the Rochester water commissioners, &c. &c, Decided January 1876, New York Supreme Court.  General Term, Fourth Department

1876 "Hemlock Lake Water. Long Expected, Come at Last," Democrat and Chronicle, January 24, 1876, Page 4.

1876 Charles Harrison, as Survivor of Himself and James Jones and Henry Jones, Appellant, v. William R. Utley and Andrew J. Wilkin, Respondents, 6 Hun. 565, January Term 1876, New York Supreme Court Fourth Department.  Dispute about ownership of cast-iron pipe purchased by Alexander Easton and installed by the Rochester Water Works Company.

1876 "Lane's Hydraulic Motor," Democrat and Chronicle, February 12, 1876, Page 4.
At the plumbing establishment of Charles S. Siddons, on East Main street, and also at the store of E. S. Phelps, can be seen one of those admirable inventions, the Lane hydraulic motor. It is impossible to describe the wonderful invention completely. It must be seen and its workings examined. It is designed to be run by city water and is as light, compact and powerful a machine as was ever invented. It is just the thing for light manufacturing purposes, for the labratory, the dentist's office, the ladies' sewing-room, for running any kind of a sewing-machine and ornaments a parlor as well as any other mechanical invention can. A pedal controls the flow of water and hence graduates the speed to any power desired. G. F. Haight is the general agent, who will be pleased to show the machine and explain its workings to all. The cost of running it is too trifling to mention, as the stream which affords the power is very small indeed. Upon a sewing-machine it is especially fine, giving no drip and producing no moisture to stain the most delicate fabric. By all means go to E. S. Phelps's, number 4 East Main street, and examine this wonder.

1876 An act to amend chapter one hundred and forty-three of the laws of eighteen hundred and sixty-one, entitled "An act to amend and consolidate the several acts in relation to the charter of the city of Rochester," passed April eight, eighteen hundred and sixty-one, and the various acts amendatory thereof or relating to the city of Rochester.  March 1, 1876.  Established an executive board to replace the water and public works commissioners.

1876 "Common Council," Democrat and Chronicle, March 22, 1876, Page 4.
Remarks by J. Nelson Tubbs on use of Hemlock water at fires by turning water on directly from Rush reservoir.  This has a head of 250 feet making the strong pressure of 110 pounds to the inch.

1876 Proceedings of the Common Council, for the City of Rochester, for 1875-76
Pages 235-237: Report of Water Commissioners and Report of Chief Engineer Water Works, March 28, 1876.

1876 Proceedings of the Common Council of the City of Rochester for 1876-77.
Pages 20-21:  "Free Water" proposal by water commissioners.  April 4, 1876.

1876 "'Free Water'," Democrat and Chronicle, April 18, 1876, Page 2.

1876 Rules, regulations and water rates for Rochester Water Works, May 1, 1876

1876 "The Rochester Water Works," Democrat and Chronicle, May 18, 1876, Page 4. | part 2 |
Below we publish an interesting, condensed history of the water-works system of this city, taken from the city manual recently issued by Clerk Angevine.

1876 "The Rochester Water Works," Baltimore Underwriter 15:332 (May 25, 1876)

1876 In the Matter of the Application of the Rochester Water Commissioners to Acquire Lands of The Rochester Water Company, 66 N.Y. 413, June 20, 1876, Court of Appeals of the State of New York

1876 "Rochester, N. Y.," from Addresses as President of the National Board of Fire Underwriters of the United States: On Several Occasions, 1871-76

1876 "Common Council," Democrat and Chronicle, October 6, 1876, Page 3. | part 2 | also here |
Report of Water Commissioners, September 30, 1876.
The Rochester Water Company was vigorous in opposition, in order to forward their scheme of supplying, or attempting to supply, the city themselves, and pursued us through the courts of the state to prevent our work.  Our position was embarrassing in the extreme. But we entered upon, have continued, and now completed the work. Others might have done it better, more wisely, more cheaply, and with fewer mistakes. But we believe the judgment of the people is, whatever may have been the deficiencies of those in charge, it has been well done, and there are none who would now have it undone.

1876 Proceedings of the Common Council, 1876-77
Page 173, November 14, 1876 Claim of George D. Lord for extra work done on works works in the amount of $600,388.97, .

1876 Proceedings of the Common Council, 1876-77
Page 180-181, November 28, 1876. City response to claim of George D. Lord,

1876 Annual report of the Executive Board in charge of the Department of Water Works, Fire, Highway and Street Improvement for the year 1876 to the mayor and Common Council of the city of Rochester, N.Y January, 1877
Pages 108-119: Report to the Executive Board of the City of Rochester, N.Y.: on the recent peculiar condition of the Hemlock Lake water supply, by S A Lattimore

1877 Proceedings of the Common Council 1876-77
Pages 219-221, January 23, 1877. Supreme Court, Monroe County; George D. Lord against the city of Rochester, William R. Seward and Thomas Leighton.

1877 "$600,388.97.  George D. Lord vs. The City of Rochester," Democrat and Chronicle, January 23, 1877, Page 4.

1877 Charles Harrison, Survivor, etc., Respondent, v. Andrew J. Wilkin, Impleaded, etc., Appellant, 69 N. Y. 412, April 27, 1877, Court of Appeals of the State of New York

1877 "The Lord Suit," Democrat and Chronicle, April 30, 1877, Page 4.
Answer to the complaint.

1877 "An Important Restriction," Democrat and Chronicle, April 30, 1877, Page 4.
The 1873 contract with James McDonald prohibited assigning it.

1877 Rules, regulations and water rates for Rochester Water Works, May 1, 1877

1877 An act to amend chapter one hundred and forty-three of the laws of eighteen hundred and sixty-one, entitled "An act to amend and consolidate the several acts in relation to the charter of the city of Rochester," passed April eighth, eighteen hundred and sixty-one, and the various acts amendatory thereof or relating to the city of Rochester.  May 3, 1877

1877 "Hydraulic Elevators," Democrat and Chronicle, May 9, 1877, Page 4.
The introduction ot water works in our city seems likely to prove a valuable source of power to the many wholesale merchants, hotels, and ether requiring the use of elevators, but who have not had power to run them, and would not be to the expense and annoyance of putting in steam for that special use. The first successful hydraulic elevator has just been introduced by L. S. Graves, of Mill street. The first one was put in at T. J. Hurley & Co.'s, wholesale millinery house on State street. The second one has just been completed at Burke, FitzSimons, Hone & Co's new wholesale department. They seem to be all that can be desired in the way of a safe, noiseless, quick-running, elevator, economical to run and easy to manage. Mr. Graves has built and put up many steam elevators, which are assuredly popular, and we have no doubt he will meet with the success he deserves in this new feature of his business.

1877 An act to authorize the city of Rochester to acquire the title to land or other property for the use and purposes of water-works, sewers, dumping rubbish and dirt.  June 16, 1877

1877 George D. Lord vs. City of Rochester. Scrapbook of clippings detailing George D. Lord's lawsuit against the City of Rochester over the cost of building the city's water system. Held by Rochester Historical Society.

1877 History of Monroe County, New York, by Prof. Wm. H. McIntosh
Page 93:  The Water Works

1877 Second annual report of the Executive Board of the City of Rochester, in charge of the Water Works, Fire, and Highway Departments, and of Street Improvements for the year 1877.  January, 1878

1878 Rules, regulations and water rates for Rochester Water Works, May 1, 1878

1878 "The Holly System of Water Supply and Fire Protection for Cities and Villages," Scientific American Supplement, 6(140supp):2219-2234 (September 7, 1878)

1879 "Comparative Rates," Democrat and Chronicle, February 12, 1879, Page 4.
Family Water Rents Lower in Rochester than in Any Other City.

1879 Proceedings of the Common Council of the City of Rochester 1879-80
Pages 4-5: April 8, 1879.  Mayor's address.  At the introduction of the water works, the people of this city were paying yearly in fire insurance premiums over $400,000, and at this date careful estimates show that there is paid less than $200,000 year.
Since they have been fully in operation there has been a savings in the cost of operating and maintaining the fire department of the city over $33,000 per annum, a reduction of forty-eight and one-half per cent.

1879 Third Annual Report of the Executive Board of the City of Rochester, in charge of the Water Works, Fire, and Highway Departments, and of Street Improvements, for the sixteen months ending May 1st, 1879.

1879 An act to amend chapter one hundred and forty-three of the laws of eighteen hundred and sixty-one, entitled "An act to amend and consolidate the several acts in relation to the charter of the city of Rochester," and the various acts amendatory thereof, or relating to the city of Rochester.  April 17, 1879

1879 An act to confer additional powers and duties upon the executive board and the water works and fire board of the city of Rochester.  June 20, 1879

1879 Charles Harrison, Survivor, etc., Respondent, v. Andrew J. Wilkin, Impleaded, etc., Appellant, 78 N. Y. 390, October 1, 1879, Court of Appeals of the State of New York

1879 Smith v. City of Rochester, November 25, 1879, New York Supreme Court, special term held at Canandaigua, Ontario County.  Decision and opinion by Judge David Ramsey in favor of Rochester can be found here, and his opinion here.  The case was overturned on appeal, see 1883 references.

1879 Reminiscences of James C. Ayer and the Town of Ayer, Second Edition, by Charles Cowley
Pages 61-62: ROCHESTER WATER WORKS.
Mr. Ayer purchased the franchises and property of a company organized under the laws of New York for the purpose of  supplying with water the city of Rochester with a population of eighty thousand. Although he was unable to complete this enterprise during his life? because of the subsequent attempt through the New York legislature to defraud him of his franchises ; it nevertheless is a striking example of the enterprise and daring of the man, and the versatility and fearlessness of his genius.
When the action of the Legislature was taken, he had already laid out over $150,000, in the construction of water-works for the city. He was then obliged to commence lawsuits against the city, to maintain his rights, and the water is still the subject of legislation.
Mr. Ayer was never satisfied with tlhe course taken by the city of Rochester in relation to this enterprise. He enjoyed many a joke at the city's expense.

1880 City of Rochester v. Town of Rush, 80 N. Y. 302, March 9, 1880, Court of Appeals of the State of New York | Case records and briefs |

1880 Fourth Annual Report of the Executive Board in charge of Highways and Street Improvements; and Report of the Water Works and Fire Board in Charge of the Water Works and Fire Departments of the City of Rochester, for the eleven months ending April 1, 1880.

1880 Proceedings of the Rochester Common Council 1880-1881
Page 4:  April 6, 1880.  The Mayor's Annual Address, by Cornelius R. Parsons.  Water Works and Fire Department.
The legislature of this state in the act granting to the city of Rochester the right to nse the water of Hemlock lake, provided that the city might draw down the surface of the same eight feet, which would provide a daily supply to the city for the year of over 13,000,000 gallons even if no water came into the lake from rain, snow or springs during that time, a supply more than fifty per cent. in excess of what our water works conduit can convey. This statement alone should satisfy our citizens that the supply to be obtained from Hemlock lake so far as the city’s need is concerned is practically inexhaustable, but it is introduced here as preliminary to another statement and recommendation. While the city has the permission of the legislature to draw down the lake eight feet, yet as a matter of fact it is at present unable to draw it lower than about three feet, in consequence of the intervention of the Hoppough mill pond just below the foot of the lake. The dam of this mill maintains the surface of the water in the mill pond to such a height that but about three feet can be drawn from the surface of the lake as above stated. The fact that this dam would have to be lowered has always been understood by those in charge of the water works, and attention was called to the fact in an early report of the water commissioners. The quantity of water used in this city has now become so great that it is a necessity that this dam should be lowered. The mill property is now owned by the estate of J. C. Ayer, of Lowell, Mass., and there are two ways in which the city may proceed to acquire the rights it desires in the property. The first would be to purchase the whole, and then sell off such rights in it as the city may not need. The other would be that the city should proceed to acquire only such rights as it may desire in the property, either by purchase or appraisal, under the provisions of act chapter 464, laws of 1877. The rights required by the city would be the title to the lands adjacent to the foot of the lake, and the timber bulkhead thereon, and also the right to have the crest of the dam at Hemlock lake village cut down five feet. I respectfully urge upon the common council the importance of commencing the proceedings for acquiring these rights immediately.

1880 New York Times, October 24, 1880, Page 5.
ROCHESTER, N.Y., Oct. 23.—The Supreme Court, General Term, in session here, gave a decision to-day in the case of George D. Lord against the City of Rochester in favor of the plaintiff, granting a new trial.

1880 Proceedings of the Rochester Common Council 1880-1881
Page 160:  November 16, 1880.  Report of negotiations with the estate of James C. Ayer concerning the purpose of certain property owned by the old Water Works Company.

1881 An act to empower the executive board of the city of Rochester to acquire land and other property for the water works of said city.  March 15, 1881

1881 Fifth Annual Report of the Executive Board, in charge of the Water Works, Fire, and Highway Departments, and of Street Improvements, for the year ending April 4, 1881.

1881 Rules, regulations and water rates for Rochester Water Works, May 1, 1881

1881 Rochester, Engineering News, 8:233 (June 11, 1881)

1881 Proceedings of the Rochester Common Council 1881-1882
Pages 156-157:  October 14, 1881 Thomas Leighton v. Roswell Hart, Charles C. Morse, Gilman H. Perkins, and John Bower, Dispute involving payment for 1873 contract with James McDonald.

1881 Democrat and Chronicle, October 23, 1881, Page 4.
The heirs of the J. C. Ayer estate have notified the proper officials and attorneys that they will appeal from the report of the commission of appraisal, which awarded their Hemlock lake land to the city for $2,050.

1881 "Action of the Executive Board," Democrat and Chronicle, December 24, 1881, Page 3.
The executive board yesterday addressed a communication to the common council informing that body of the desire of the old Rochester Water Works company to effect an amicable adjustment of thee difficulties with the city, regarding property at Hemlock lake. The council is asked to appoint a special committee to act with the board in this matter.

1882 New York Times, March 17, 1882, Page 5.
What Rochester Had to Pay. Rochester, N.Y., March 16.— In the County Clerk's office yesterday afternoon William F. Cogswell filed a receipt for the satisfaction of a judgment against the city by the Supreme Court in the case of George D. Lord against the City of Rochester.  The amount receipted for is $61,601.70, and a stipulation of discontinuance had been made.  The plaintiffs received a check for the amount awarded, and the great suit is therefore at an end.

1882 Sixth Annual Report of the Executive Board, in charge of the Water Works, Fire, and Highway Departments, and of Street Improvements, for the year ending April 4, 1882. | Another copy |

1882 Rules, regulations and water rates for Rochester Water Works, May 1, 1882

1882 An act to further amend chapter one hundred and forty-three of the laws of eighteen hundred and sixty-one, entitled " an act to amend and consolidate the several acts in relation to the charter of the city of Rochester," as amended and established by chapter fourteen, laws of eighteen hundred and eighty, and the several acts amendatory thereof and supplementary thereto.  May 2, 1882

1882 "The Water Works Assessment," Rochester Democrat and Chronicle, August 8, 1882, Page 2.
Complaints about frontage tax for water.

1882 "Rochester Water Works," Scientific American (New Series) 47(7):95 (August 12, 1882)

1882 Rochester, from "The Water-Supply of Certain Cities and Towns of the United States," by Walter G. Elliot, C. E., Ph. D.

1883 Seventh Annual Report of the Executive Board, in charge of the Water Works, Fire, and Highway Departments, and of Street Improvements, for the year ending April 2, 1883.
Pages 27-28:  The city has during the past year purchased all the property formerly owned by the Rochester Water Company.  Also the twelve inch water main laid by said company in Plymouth Avenue between Spring and Troup streets.  [A list of all the property purchased for $26,000 is listed on pages 85 and 86 of the Proceedings of the Common Council of the City of Rochester 1882-83.]

1883 Hiram Smith et al, Appellants, v. The City of Rochester, Respondent, 92 N. Y. 463, June 5, 1883, Court of Appeals of New York State | Records and Briefs |
The plaintiffs owned and operated mills on a fresh and non-navigable creek, fed by the surplus waters of three small inland lakes, one of which was navigable, and navigated for local purposes by those who dwelt on its shores. All the premises in question were originally ceded by this State to Massachusetts by the treaty of 1786. The defendant, under recent legislative authority, constructed a conduit from the latter lake to supply the city, drawing 4,000,000 gallons of water daily. Held, that such diversion, being injurious to the defendant, may be enjoined, and the defendant must respond for the injury.
The leading case in this State is Smith v. The City of Rochester, 92 N. Y. 463; on second trial, 38 Hun. 612, July 1885, opinion affirmed, 104 N.Y., 674, decided February 8, 1887.

1883 O-neh-da Te-car-ne-o-di: Or, Up and Down the Hemlock. Including History, Commerce, Accidents, Incidents, Guide, Etc, by Dennis Byron Waite
Pages 6-8:  The Legislature of this state April 16, 1852, passed an act incorporating the first Water Works Company of the city of Rochester. Certain residents of the city were named in the act, with others, with a capital stock of 200,000 dollars, to be taken in shares of $25 each, with power to take water from any spring, lake, pond or river to the city. This is called the old Company. April 16, 1868, all contracts entered into, and officers elected under the previous act were legalized and confirmed. The contract to take water from this lake to the city was let to Eastman, passed into the hands of Utley, thence to Ayers of pill notoriety, and the second outlet was dug, pipes were laid, and considerable other work was done on a portion of the route, but the Legislature April 16, 1872 passed another Act to supply said City with pure and wholesome water.
Five Commissioners were appointed by the Mayor thereof who Selected J. N. Tubbs as Engineer, and Prof. Lattimore as Analyzer, with instructions to examine the waters of Genesee River and Lakes Ontario and Hemlock, and in the fall of that year their reports were made with the positive conclusion that for greater economy in operating expense, permanency in construction of works , greater purity and softness of water and its steady and abundant supply, the last named body of water should furnish to said city the much and long needed supply; also an act was passed by the Legislature June 3, 1873, giving power to said Commissioners as agents for said city "to raise the surface of the water, in said lake, not to exceed two feet, and to draw down the said water below low-water mark, not to exceed, eight feet: also the right to take such measures and make such constructions as shall be necessary to secure said waters for the purpose intended, and to protect the same from improper obstructions or pollution. After an outlay of some $3,000,000, the water wras let into the pipe in Dec, 1875.

1884 Rules and regulations and schedule of water rates : of the Rochester Water works, established by the Executive Board, May 1st, 1884.| another copy |

1884 Eighth Annual Report of the Executive Board, in charge of the Water Works, Fire, and Highway Departments, and of Street Improvements, for the year ending April 7, 1884.

1884 Engineering News 11:174 (April 12, 1884)
Mr. Emil Kuichling, Assistant Engineer of Rochester Water Works, N. Y., arrived in New York on Sunday evening last, in the Spain from Liverpool. Mr. Kuichling has been absent four months, and has visited Antwerp, Aix la Chapelle, Cologne, Hanover, Berlin, Leipsic, Frankfort-on-Main, Darmstadt, Carlsrhue, Strasburg, Mayence, Metz, Dusseldorf, Rotterdam, London, Birmingham, Liverpool, and Manchester, on a tour of inspection of works of Sewerage and Water Supply, with special reference to the needs of the New York State Board of Health, by which Mr. Kuichling is frequently retained as consulting Engineer. Mr. Kuichling has made as peciai study of the physics of Water Supply for cities and the disposal of sewage, for some years past, and paid particular attention to these subjects while abroad.

1884 "The Rochester Water Works," by Nelson J. Tubbs, Engineer in charge of the water works, from Semi-centennial History of the City of Rochester: With Illustrations and Biographical Sketches of Some of Its Prominent Men and Pioneers, by William Farley Peck

1884 In Supreme Court, general term- fifth department In the Matter of the Application of the City of Rochester to acquire the permanent and perpetual right to draw from Hemlock and Canadice lakes an amount of water sufficient for the use of said city and its inhabitants, not exceeding nine millions of gallons per day; record on appeal from order confirming report of commissioners of appraisal, Volume 1 | Volume 2 | Hathi Trust copy |

1884 "Water Works," from Rochester: A Story Historical, by Jenny Marsh Parker

1884 The Industrial Advance of Rochester: A Historical, Statistical & Descriptive Review
Pages 39-40:  The Water Works.

1885 Ninth Annual Report of the Executive Board, in charge of the Water Works, Fire, and Highway Departments, and of Street Improvements, for the year ending April 6, 1885.

1885 "Looking over the Line.  An Official Inspection of the Reservoirs and Conduit," Democrat and Chronicle, May 27, 1885, Page 6. | also here |  A tour from the Mt. Hope (now Highland Park) Reservoir to Hemlock Lake.

1885 Hiram Smith and others, Respondents, v. The City of Rochester, Appellant, 38 Hun. 612, July, 1885, Fifth Department, Supreme Court of the State of New York

1886 John M. Winslow (1811-1886) grave. alderman, wrote water works report in 1850s, secretary of Rochester Water Works Company

1886 Democrat and Chronicle, March 24, 1866, Page 7.
Last evening about 6 o'clock the death of John M. Winslow occurred at his residence, corner of Jones and Fulton avenues at the age of 75 years.  Mr. Winslow was a prominent man in the city and has lived here for a long time. His death, which was quite sudden, will be generally regretted by a large circle of friends. Mr. Winslow attended church last Thursday evening and the next day was taken with pneumonia, continuing to get worse until death ensued last evening. The deceased was engaged in the drug business for a number of years and was chairman of the Common Council at the time Main street bridge was constructed. He leaves a wife and one son, Hobart G., of New York. Notice of the funeral will be given hereafter.

1886 Tenth Annual Report of the Executive Board, in charge of the Water Works, Fire, and Highway Departments, and of Street Improvements, for the year ending April 5, 1886.
Page 129-131:  Table giving water rates charged in the chief cities of the U.S.

1886 Rules, regulations and water rates for Rochester Water Works, May 1, 1886

1886 Matter of the Application of the City of Rochester to acquire the permanent and perpetual right to draw from Hemlock and Canadice lakes an amount of water sufficient for the use of said city and its inhabitants, etc, 40 Hun, 588, June, 1886, Supreme Court of the State of New York, General Term, Fifth Department 

1886 Report on the Social Statistics of Cities, Tenth Census of the United States
Pages 620-621:  Rochester Water-Works.
Page 623:  Human excreta.  Only about 15 per cent. of houses in Rochester are provided with water-closets, most of which empty into the public sewers.

1887 Hiram Smith and others, Respondents, v. The City of Rochester, Appellant, 104 N.Y., 674, February 8, 1887, New York State Court of Appeals.  Judgment affirmed.

1887 Proceedings of the Common Council of the City of Rochester 1886-87
Pages 514-515:  March 22, 1887,  List of payments for damages per Court of Appeals Decision of February 8, 1887, totaling $103,998.50.

1887 Eleventh Annual Report of the Executive Board, in charge of the Water Works, Fire, and Highway Departments, and of Street Improvements, for the year ending April 4, 1887.

1888 Charles Jenkins Hayden 1816-1888 grave, President of the Rochester Water Works Company

1888 "The Sanitary Protection of the Water Shed Supply Water to Rochester, N.Y.," by J. Nelson Tubbs, Engineering News 19:330-331 (April 28. 1888)

1888 Rules, regulations and water rates for Rochester Water Works, May 1, 1888

1888 "Rochester's Water Supply," from The Industries of the City of Rochester

1888 "Rochester," from Manual of American Water Works, Volume 1.

1888 Proceedings of the Common Council, 1888-89
Pages 231-242:  October 2, 1888.  Report of Chief Engineer J.N. Tubbs, with reference to an additional water supply, September 21, 1888.

1889 Twelfth and Thirteenth Annual Reports of the Executive Board, in charge of the Water Works, Fire, and Highway Departments, and of Street Improvements, for the years ending April 2, 1888 and April 1, 1889.
Pages 42-52:   Preliminary report of Messrs. Mallory, Rafter and Line [and Final report of Messrs. Rafter and Line] of the Academy of Science, on the cause of the odor and taste in the Hemlock Lake water supply, by M L Mallory; Geo W Rafter; J Edw Line
Pages 52-77:  Report of Chief Engineer with Reference to an Additional Water Supply for the City of Rochester, September 21, 1888. {Also printed separately]
Pages 77-79:  Mr. Bissell's Report with the view of obtaining an increased supply of water for the city by the Gang and Siphon Well System.  September 14, 1888

1889 Proceedings of the Common Council, 1889-90
Page 17:  April 2, 1889.  Resolved, That the president of this board be requested to appoint a special committee of three members to investigate the following special features of the water supply question, in order that the people can have laid before them such fats as may be necessary for them to be able to judge as to the necessity of having another conduit from Hemlock lake or elsewhere:
First - As to whether the numerous steam ­boilers, located within the limits of the Holly system, cannot uso the Holly system, instead or the Hemlock system.
Second - As to whether such a difference in price between the Hemlock and Holly waters can he made, so as to encourage the use of the Holly system in preference to lake water, for the use of boilers and elevators.
Third - As to whether the hoisting of elevators by Hemlock pressure cannot be done away with.
Fourth - As to what steps can be taken to suppress the wholesale waste of Hemlock water.
Fifth - To report such general recommendations as they may deem proper and just.
Pages 61-75:  May 14, 1889.  Report of Special Committee on obtaining an additional water supply, including "Report of an Additional Water Supply for the City of Rochester, N.Y., by J.T. Fanning and Alphonse Fteley, Consulting Engineers, April, 1889"  {Also printed separately]
Pages 203-216: September 3, 1889.  A Review and Discussion of the Several Plans Heretofore Suggested for an Additional Water Supply for the City of Rochester, N.Y., August 20, 1889.  {Also printed separately]
Pages 323-337: December 26, 1889  Report of the Special Common Council Committee on Special Features of the Additional Water Supply [Also printed separately]

1889 Report on the proposed trunk sewer for the east side of the City of Rochester, N.Y, by Emil Kuichling, April 29, 1889 | East Side Trunk Sewer Survey Map |

1889 Official reports on an additional water supply, for the City of Rochester, N.Y., includes "Report of Chief Engineer J.N. Tubbs, with reference to an additional water supply," September 21, 1888; "Report of an Additional Water Supply for the City of Rochester, N.Y.," by J.T. Fanning and Alphonse Fteley, Consulting Engineers, April, 1889; and "A Review and Discussion of the Several Plans Heretofore Suggested for an Additional Water Supply for the City of Rochester, N.Y.," August 20, 1889.

1889 Report of the Special Common Council Committee on Special Features of the Additional Water Supply, December 26, 1889.

1890 "What Mr. Tubbs Thinks." Rochester Democrat and Chronicle, April 3, 1890, Page 5.
His Opinion Relative to the Water Meter Question.

1890 Proceedings of the Executive Board, in charge of the Water Works, Fire, and Highway Departments, and of Street Improvements, for the year ending April 7, 1890.
Pages 123-124:  Schedule of water rates.

1890 Annual Report of the Executive Board, in charge of the Water Works, Fire and Highway Departments, and of Street Improvements, for the year ending April 7, 1890.
Pages 107-127:  Report on an endemic of typhoid fever, at Springwater, New York, in October and November, 1889, by Geo W Rafter; M L Mallory

1890 "Pumping Down Hill," Rochester Democrat and Chronicle, April 8, 1890, Page 5.
The Chamber of Commerce Thinks it is Unnecessary.  Gravity will do the work.

1890 Rules, regulations and water rates for Rochester Water Works, May 1, 1890

1890 "The Recent Endemic of Typhoid Fever at Springwater, N. Y., considered with special reference to its cause, and the contamination of the Rochester water supply which might result therefrom," by George W. Rafter and M. L. Mallory, Proceedings of the Rochester Academy of Sciences, 1:65-86 (June 23, 1890)

1890 "Rochester's Water Supply," letter by James G. Cutler, Rochester Democrat and Chronicle, June 27, 1890, Page 4.

1890 "Is the Mystery Solved?" Rochester Democrat and Chronicle, July 18, 1890, Page 5.
Probable that the conduit never carried 9,000,000 gallons.  Mr. Tubbs has resigned at the request of the Executive Board.  He handed in his resignation yesterday - His probable successor - Opinions from Prominent Men.

1890 Rochester Union & Advertiser, August 4, 1890, Page 4-4
Letter to editor on water meter controversy

1890 "Needed at Home," Rochester Democrat and Chronicle, August 16, 1890, Page 5.
The Mayor Thinks Emil Kutchling Should be Working for the City.

1890 "Only Rumor," Rochester Democrat and Chronicle, August 20, 1890, Page 6.
Engineer Emil Kutchling and the Water Works Department.

1890 "His Responsibility," Rochester Democrat and Chronicle, September 4, 1890, Page 4.
Emil Kutchling's responsibility for designing the 1876 Hemlock conduit.

1890 "Kuichling is Elected," Rochester Democrat and Chronicle, September 6, 1890, Page 5.
Chief Engineer of the Water Works Department.

1890 "Construction Details of the Rochester, N. Y., Water-Works, Part 1, Description of Water Shed and Description and Illustration of the Method and Results of the Sanitary Protection of Hemlock Lake," Engineering Record, 22:412-413 (November 29, 1890)

1890 "Rochester," from Manual of American Water Works, Volume 2.

1890 History of Middlesex County, Massachusetts, with biographical sketches of many of its pioneers and prominent men, Volume II
Page 102:  James C. Ayer.  Another enterprise in which he embarked, was that of supplying the people of Rochester, New York, with water. The perfect success of the Rochester Water Works demonstrates the soundness of Mr. Ayer's plan, notwithstanding the disastrous litigation which delayed it. Many and various enterprises occupied his attention — more than were ever known, except to his immediate associates.

1891 "Lift Bridge Problems," Rochester Democrat and Chronicle, January 1, 1891, Page 5.
How the Bridges affect the Holly System.  The Fire pressure reduced.

1891 "Construction Details of the Rochester, N. Y., Water-Works, Part 2, Illustrations and description of the inlet crib, inlet main, laying submerged main, and the lake gate-house," Engineering Record, 23:78 (January 3, 1891)

1891 "Construction Details of the Rochester, N. Y., Water-Works, Part 3, Hemlock Lake Screens and gates, and the Genesee River Bulkhead," Engineering Record, 23:94-95 (January 10, 1891)

1891 "Construction Details of the Rochester, N. Y., Water-Works, Part 4, Rainfall and collection, details of Canadice lake bulkhead framing and machinery," Engineering Record, 23:109 (January 17, 1891)

1891 "Construction Details of the Rochester, N. Y., Water-Works, Part 5, Description, plan, section and details of the storage and distributing reservoirs, straining well, gate-house and pipe trenches," Engineering Record, 23:127 (January 24, 1891)

1891 "Construction Details of the Rochester, N. Y., Water-Works, Part 6, Description and illustrations of the Holly system, reservoir fountain, air valves, and the connection between the high and low pressure mains," Engineering Record, 23:143 (January 31, 1891)

1891 "Construction Details of the Rochester, N. Y., Water-Works, Part 7, Wooden stop gate chamber, elevation, plan and details of special bridge construction to receive water mains at arch-crown," Engineering Record, 23:159 (February 7, 1891)

1891 Fifteenth Annual Report of the Executive Board, in charge of the Water Works, Fire, and Highway Departments, and of Street Improvements, for the year ending April 6, 1891.

1891 "Rochester," from Manual of American Water Works, Volume 3.

1892 "On the Hydraulics of the Hemlock Lake Conduit of the Rochester, N. Y., Water-Works."  and "On the measures for restricting the use and waste of water, in force in the City of Rochester, N. Y.," with discussion. George W. Rafter. Transactions of the American Society of Civil Engineers, 26:13-22 (January, 1892). | also here (with profile) |

1892 Sixteenth Annual Report of the Executive Board, in charge of the Water Works, Fire, and Highway Departments, and of Street Improvements, for the year ending April 4, 1892.

1892 An act to authorize the issue of bonds of the city of Rochester to pay for an additional water supply.  April 20, 1892

1892 Fire and Water, 12(20) (November 12, 1892)  Report on flow through the Hemlock Lake conduit.

1892 Sanborn Fire Insurance Map from Rochester, Monroe County, New York. Volume 1 | Volume 2 | Volume 3 |

1893 Seventeenth Annual Report of the Executive Board, in charge of the Water Works, Fire, and Highway Departments, and of Street Improvements, for the year ending April 3, 1893.

1893 Fire and Water (April 8, 1893)
A contract has been framed and extended between the city of Rochester, through its board of water commissioners, and the Rochester Water Supply Company, to furnish water from artesian wells located at Brighton. The price to be paid to the company by the city is $80 per 1,000,000 gallons or less per day of twenty-four hours, and in excess of 1,000,000 up to 2,000,000 gallons pcr day, $70 per 1,000,000, and in excess of 2,000,000 gallons per day, $60 per 1,000,000 gallons. The city of Rochester agrees to secure the right of way for the company to lay its mains through the city. The water is to be delivered to the Mount Hope distributing reservoir. The company, under the terms of the contract, must guarantee the potability of the water, and provide means to aerate the same if necessary ; also make chemical analysis of the water every month and submit the result to the board of water commissioners. Water to be furnished within forty-five days from date of contract, and contract to continue for one year, with privilege to the city to renew the same for a period of three months at a time. It is provided in the contract and made binding upon the company that in the event of the water being found unfit for use the city shall not be liable for the same. The city is under no obligation to take more water than is called for under the terms of the contract. The company in any event to provide additional or new wells in case of failure of others, and to meet the demand of the city of Rochester as aforesaid.

1893 "Rochester NY Quadrangle," USGS Topographical Map, southeast corner, shows Rush Reservoir and abandoned reservoir of the Rochester Water Works Company about 1.5 miles east northeast of the Rush Reservoir.  The abandoned reservoir is also very visible on Google maps.

1894 "Additional Water Supply," Rochester Democrat and Chronicle, March 15, 1894, Page 8.
Mr. Kuichling thinks it will be available by August 1st.

1894 Eighteenth Annual Report of the Executive Board, in charge of the Water Works, Fire, and Highway Departments, and of Street Improvements, for the year ending April, 1894.
Pages 17-29:  Water works fund
Pages 30-72:  Report of the Chief Engineer of Water Works, April 2, 1894.

1894 An act to authorize the city of Rochester to issue bonds to pay for a water distributing system.  May 3, 1894

1894 An act to amend chapter three hundred and fifty-eight of the laws of eighteen hundred and ninety-two, entitled "An act to authorize the issue of bonds of the city of Rochester to pay for an additional water supply."  May 3, 1894

1894 "Ruins of a Water Works," Fire and Water 15(31) (August 4, 1894)
An abandoned reservoir intended originally for a distributing reservoir for the city of Rochester, N. Y., is fast passing into utter decay. Of this landmark Engineer J. Nelson Tubbs some time ago wrote an interesting story.
Mr. Tubbs was in charge of the water works department as chief engineer when the first conduit to Hemlock Lake was laid, and he was thoroughly familiar with the history of all the water works schemes that came to the surface before the conduit was laid to Hemlock lake.
The abandoned reservoir on the Henrietta road is now nothing but a cattle pond. The other day two reporters went over to the crumbling stone tower that stands in the centre of the inclosure, climbed to its top and peered into its dark depths. This tower is circular in form, of masonry, and is about 15 feet high. The water was to have entered at the bottom of the tower and to have overflowed from the top into the reservoir. Now the reservoir was occupied by three cows. The animals were enjoying themselves splashing about in a shallow pond of water near the north bank. The capacity of this old reservoir is about 70,000.000 gallons, and it is larger than the city's reservoir at Rush. The Rush reservoir is, however, located on a plateau considerably higher than the abandoned one.
The old reservoir is now the property of the Ayer family of patent medicine fame, and the estate would be glad to sell it. An effort was made to unload it on the city of Rochester, but the city had no use for a second-hand and abandoned reservoir and refused to make the Ayer estate an offer for the ruin. The estate will probably never realize anything on the reservoir. The banks of the reservoir were completed with the exception of a gap at the road through which the teams passed in and out during the construction of the banks. The gap was never filed because the reservoir was never used. Its high banks and its crumbling tower remain as a reminder of the greed of the schemers who built a cheap water works and then tried to unload it upon the city at a fancy price.
Dr. Curran recalled that the newspapers of the time were against the old water company’s scheme to sell out to the city. Dr. Curran thinks that had it not been for this aggressive war that the city would have been a purchaser of the old plant. The first water works company was the Rochester Water Works Company, organized in 1835 with a capital of $10,000. This company did nothing and in 1852 another company was incorporated under the same name. This second company expended the avails of $800,000 in bonds and $800,000 in stock, and after all this money had been sunk in the old reservoir on the Henrietta road and in the old wooden conduit, an expert engineer, McRee Swift, reported to the stockholders that the plant of the company was worth about $223,000, and that it would require expenditure of $410,000 before water from Hemlock lake could be delivered in Rochester.
The wooden conduit was twenty-four inches in diameter. The scheme of the old company was to tap the Honeoye creek at Smithtown, which is sixteen miles south of the city. The conduit was to commence there. It will be seen that the company did not propose to tap the lake proper but only the outlet. To insure a good supply of water in the outlet a canal was constructed from the shore of the lake just west of the present gate house north a distance of 1,800 feet.  This canal was twenty feet wide and seven feet deep and it had a weir, which, however, was only partially completed. This old canal remains to-day as it was left by the old company. It is along its bank that the city now has a small railway for the transportation of the garbage collected from the cottages to the place where it is buried.
In 1872 the old water company sold out to Thomas B. Rand and others and Mr. Rand organized a new company and tried to sell to the city. The city was about to enter into a contract with the third company when it was restrained by an injunction obtained by the Board of water commissioners, appointed just previous to the reorganization of the company. The water commissioners went ahead with plans for getting water from the lake and the water company tried to sell out to the city again, offering the plant at first for $250,000 and then for $90,000, but the city was not prepared to buy. Then followed several years of litigation and discussion, the company trying injunctions and other legal modes to keep the city from going into the water business on its own hook. But the city won eventually and in 1882 the city bought what it thought might be useful of the old company’s rights and plant for the small sum of $26,000. After that the city had no trouble on account of the old company.

1894 "Pure Hemlock Now," Rochester Democrat and Chronicle, October 4, 1894, Page 7.
Brighton Wells as a Source of Water Supply Abandoned.

1895 "Story of a Big Job," Rochester Democrat and Chronicle, January 27, 1895, Page 10. | Part 2 | Reprinted in The School of Mines Quarterly 16(3):251-286 (April, 1895)
Description of the Construction of the New Water Works Conduit.

1895 "The New Conduit of the Rochester Water Works," by Emil Kuichling, The School of Mines Quarterly 16(3):251-286 (April, 1895)

1895 "The New Steel and Masonry Water-Supply Conduit, Rochester, N. Y.," Engineering News 33(15):284-287 (April 11, 1895)

1895 "The New Rochester Water Works," Engineering Record 31(20):346-348 (April 13, 1895)

1895 An act to provide for the sanitary protection of the sources of water supply of the city of Rochester by the acquisition by said city of real property and interests therein necessary for that purpose, and by the abatement and removal of sources of pollution.  June 14, 1895.

1895 A History of the City of Rochester from the Earliest Times, by the Rochester Post Express. | also here |
Page 53: The capacity of the water-works, drawing from Hemlock lake, is 22,000,000 gallons a day, or enough to supply a city of 250,000 population. The water is distributed through two hundred and fifty-seven miles of pipe.
Page 58: Water-Works. A Rochester Works company was incorporated in 1835 to supply the city with water from springs that existed near what is now Mount Hope cemetery, but it did no work. In 1852 another company was organized with the same name as the above, to bring water to the city from Honeoye creek. No work was done by this corporation until 1867, when it began to lay wooden pipe from Smithtown, on Honeoye creek, to this city, and during the following five years laid a quantity of sheet-iron and cement pipe in several streets of the city. No water was ever brought to the city by the company. The sum of $800,000 is said to have been expended on the work. In 1872  the city was authorized by act of the Legislature to procure a supply of water for domestic and fire purposes from Hemlock lake. The work was commenced in 1873 and completed in 1876 at a cost of $3,182,000.  The commissioners under whom the work was done were: Roswell Hart, Edward M. Smith, William H. Bowman, Charles C. Morse, Gilman H.  Perkins, P. M. Bromley, John Bower, Maurice H. Merriman and James C. Cochrane. J. Nelson Tubbs, was chief engineer; Isaac F. Quinby, consulting engineer, and Emil Kuichling, principal assistant engineer.  In 1893  work was commenced on a second conduit to Hemlock lake, and in 1894 it began to convey water to the city. The line has a capacity of 15,000,000 gallons daily. Emil Kuichling was chief engineer, with Gaylord Thompson and Edwin A. Fisher as principal assistants. The cost of the new line, including water rights and right of way, was $1,750,000.  The work was done under the direction of the Executive Board
Pages 229-231:  Emil Kuichling biography
Pages 230-231: J. Nelson Tubbs biography.

1895 Nineteenth and Twentieth Annual Report of the Executive Board, in charge of the Water Works, Fire, and Highway Departments, and of Street Improvements, for the period from April 1, 1894 to January 1, 1896. [Thanks to Micaela Holmes for securing scans of this document as a class project.]
Pages 17-33:  1894 Water Works Fund
Pages 45-76:  1895 Water Works Fund
Pages 157-305:  Report of the Chief Engineer of Water Works to the Executive Board, January 1, 1896
Pages 307-339:  Appendix No. 1.  The new conduit of the Rochester water works, by E. Kuichling.
Pages 340-351:  Appendix No. 2.  Comparison of the original computations and the actual gaugings of the new steel conduit, by E. Kuichling.
Pages 352-357:  Appendix No. 3.  Statements showing quantities of work performed and cost of new conduit, as per final estimates to contractors, and other charges against the additional water supply account.

1896 "George D. Lord Dead," Rochester Democrat and Chronicle, February 4, 1896, Page 15.
Built the first conduit.

1896 Twenty-First Annual Report of the Executive Board, in charge of the Water Works, Fire, and Highway Departments, and of Street Improvements, for the year ending December 31, 1896.

1896 "The Rochester Crime against Hydraulic Engineering," Chapter 3 in 115 Experiments on the Carrying Capacity of Large Riveted Metal Conduits, by Clemens Herschel.

1897 Engineering News 37:344 (June 3, 1897)
Discussion of issues about flow volume in the 1876 conduit.

1897 "The Water Works of Rochester," Water and Gas Review 8(2):9-16 (August, 1897)

1897 Illustrated history of the Rochester Trades Assembly and the Building Trades Council, Rochester, N. Y commercial history of the city of Rochester, photographs and biographies of officers, state, city and miscellaneous labor laws, etc. | also here |
Pages 117-119:  City Water Supply.
The source of Rochester's water supply is Hemlock Lake, a clear and beautiful body of water, twenty-eight miles south of the city. It is, about seven miles long by three-fourths of a mile in width, and in its cool depths are many springs. The lake has an area of 2,000 acres, and is 338 feet above the level of the city. Its shores are for thirty miles about the lake patrolled by men in the employ of Rochester. It is a fact, admitted by expert*, that no city in the world is supplied with potable water of rarer purity than is Rochester. From the lake the water is conducted by two conduits to the Hush reservoir, eight miles from the city, which has a capacity of 53,813,807 gallons, and from there it goes to the Mt. Hope distributing reservoir, about one and one-half miles from the center of the city. This reservoir has a capacity of 24,278,101 gallons, and is 127 feet above the level of the city. From the distributing reservoir the water is carried to all parts of the city. The first conduit line supplied 7,000,000 gallons a day, and a second conduit, bringing an additional 15,000,000 gallons a day, has been completed, making the supply of clear, pure water for domestic use 22,000,000 gallons per day. In addition to this supply there is the Holly system for fire and mechanical purposes, pumping water from the Genesee river, 7,000,000 gallons of water per day. This supply of water from both sources is distributed to all parts of the city by means of 270 miles of pipe. The total cost of the water works to date has been about $10,000,000.

1897 Twenty-Second Annual Report of the Executive Board, in charge of the Water Works, Fire, and Highway Departments, and of Street Improvements, for the year ending December 31, 1897.

1897 "Rochester," from Manual of American Water Works, Volume 4.

1898 "Portage Storage Dam Project," Rochester Democrat and Chronicle, March 7, 1898, Page 8.
In this city, the elevation of the surface of the feeder dam is 510 feet, and the surface of Lake Ontario is 247 feet above the sea level, leaving a fall of 263 feet, nearly all available for water power.

1898 Anna B. Neal, Respondent, v. The City of Rochester, Appellant, 156 N. Y. 213, June 7, 1898, Court of Appeals of the State of New York

1898 "A few considerations of municipal water supply, with special reference to that of Rochester, N.Y.," by Emil Kuichling, C. E., from The Cornell Civil Engineer 6:1-10 (1897-1898) | also here |

1898 Twenty-Third Annual Report of the Executive Board, in charge of the Water Works, Fire, and Highway Departments, and of Street Improvements, for the year ending December 31, 1898.

1898 Moffett, Hodgkins & Clarke Company, Petitioner, against the City of Rochester and others etc. Petition for Writ of Certiorari, September term, United States Supreme Court.

1899 Twenty-Fourth Annual Report of the Executive Board, in charge of the Water Works, Fire, and Highway Departments, and of Street Improvements, for the year ending December 31, 1899.

1900 Moffett, Hodgkins & Clarke Co. v. Rochester, 178 U.S. 373, May 21, 1900, U.S. Supreme Court

1900 First Annual Report of the Department of Public Works of the City of Rochester for the year ending December 31, 1900.
Pages 145-148:  Water Rates

1901 "Report of the City Engineer to the Commissioner of Public Works Relating to an Investigation of Electrolysis in the Water Pipe System of the City of Rochester, N.Y.," August 1, 1901, Annual Report of the Department of Public Works

1901 Second Annual Report of the Department of Public Works of the City of Rochester for the year ending December 31, 1901. 

1902 Third Annual Report of the Department of Public Works of the City of Rochester for the year ending December 31, 1902

1902 "The Water Supply of Rochester," by John F. Skinner, Official Proceedings of the Annual Convention of the American Society of Municipal Engineers 9:63-67 (October, 1902)

1902 Municipal Engineering, Volume 23, (July-December 1902)
Pages 340-342:  "The Water Supply of Rochester N. Y.," by John F. Skinner Special Assistant Engineer
Pages 342-343:  " Distributing system of the Rochester Water-Works," by W. N  Radenhurst, Water Works Assistant Engineer

1902 Rochester and Lake Ontario Water Company incorporated to supply water to the village of Brighton and Fairport, and in the towns of Greece, Gates, and Brighton.  December 30, 1902.

1903 "Rochester Water Company," Evening Tribune (Hornell, New York), January 17, 1903, Page 1.
New York, Jan. 17.- The Rochester and Lake Ontario Water company, which was incorporated at Albany on Dec. 31 with a capital stock of $2,500,000, has organized as follows.  President, Samson Q. Mingle, New York; vice president, Edward Harris, Rochester, N.Y.; treasurer, George M. Bunting, Philadelphia; secretary, H. Bayard Dodge, Philadelphia.  The company purposes to supply water to a number of villages near Rochester, and if possible to obtain a franchise to do business in Rochester.

1903 "Rochester has Pure Water and No Typhoid," Rochester Democrat and Chronicle, March 7, 1903, Page 1. | Part 2 | Part 3 |

1903 "The Fire Department Greatly Handicapped," Rochester Democrat and Chronicle, June 13, 1903, Page 11.
Chief Makes Strong Plea for More Hydrants.

1903 Rochester and Lake Ontario Water Company, Respondent, v. The City of Rochester, Appellant. 176 N. Y. 36, October 6, 1903, Court of Appeals of the State of New York

1903 "The History of the Water Supply," from Proceedings of the Common Council of the City of Rochester, October 6, 1903

1903 Fourth Annual Report of the Department of Public Works of the City of Rochester for the year ending December 31, 1903

1904 "Water Supply of Rochester," Fire and Water Engineering 35:116-117 (March 19, 1904)

1904 "Water Works Rules," Record of the Proceedings of the Common Council of the City of Rochester
Page 416:  July 26.  The service must be of lead or tin-lined lead pipe.  The service from the curb-cock into the premises may be of lead, tin-lined lead or wrought iron pipe, of equal strength with the lead pipe heretofore designated for service pipes in the roadway of the street.
Pages 419-421:  Rates for use of water.

1904 "Has Plans of Standpipe," Rochester Democrat and Chronicle, September 3, 1904, Page 10.

1904 "Standpipe on Cobbs Hill to be Built from a Raft," Rochester Democrat and Chronicle, September 17, 1904, Page 11.

1904 "Report on the City of Rochester, N. Y.," December, 1904, from Reports on Cities, No. 10,  National Board of Fire Underwriters.

1904 Sanborn Fire Insurance Map from Rochester, Monroe County, New York.

1904 Fifth Annual Report of the Department of Public Works of the City of Rochester for the year ending December 31, 1904.

1905 Sixth Annual Report of the Department of Public Works of the City of Rochester for the year ending December 31, 1905.

1906 History of the Canal System of the State of New York: Together with Brief Histories of the Canals of the United States and Canada, by Noble E. Whitford
Page 190:  Shortly after the “Stop law" of 1842 went into effect, the sheriff of Monroe county destroyed, as a public nuisance, the eighteen-inch feeder dam across the Genesee river just above Rochester, from which water had been used occasionally in emergencies since the canal was constructed. The mill owners of the city protested vigorously against the further use of water from Genesee river for canal purposes and the Legislature took no action to have the dam restored.

1906 Seventh Annual Report of the Department of Public Works of the City of Rochester for the year ending December 31, 1906

1907 "Rochester Water Works," from Municipal Code of the City of Rochester, Volume Two.  This provides a good summary of the history and litigation involved in the water works.

1907 Rochester and Lake Ontario Water Company Reservoir, Cobb's Hill. Postcard showing water tank 150 feet in diameter, 20 feet high, holding approximately 2.6 million gallons..

1907 Eighth Annual Report of the Department of Public Works of the City of Rochester for the year ending December 31, 1907

1908 "Corrosion of the Steel Water Supply Conduit at Rochester, N.Y.," by Richard W. Gaines, Engineering News 59:578-585 (May 28, 1908)

1908 Ninth and Tenth Annual Reports of the Department of Public Works of the City of Rochester for the years ending December 31, 1908 and December 31, 1909.
Page 115: During the year the original contract for Cobb‘s Hill Reservoir construction, together with a large amount of additional roadway grading, has been completed. The water was first turned into the reservoir on October 19, 1908. The reservoir was filled on January 11, 1909, since which time the water stored in it has been available for use in the city. It was actually connected with the city distribution system and water used from it on August 20, 1909, and it has been in constant service ever since.  The area of water surface, when the reservoir is full to the crest of the overflow, is 18.2 acres, and it then contains about 144,000,000 gallons of water.

1908 "The Water Works," from History of Rochester and Monroe County, New York: From the Earliest Historic Times to the Beginning of 1907, Volume 1, by William Farley Peck

1907 The City of Rochester, Respondent, v. Rochester and Lake Ontario Water Company, Appellant, 189 N. Y. 323, October 8, 1907, Court of Appeals of the State of New York

1908 "Rochester and Lake Ontario Water Plant," Fire and Water Engineering 43(24) (June 10, 1908) | Also here |

1909 "Death Comes to Nelson J. Tubbs," Rochester Democrat and Chronicle, September 21, 1909, Page 7.
For many years an engineer in state service. Expert on waterworks.

1909 "Tribute to the Late J. Nelson Tubbs," by George W. Mische, Rochester Democrat and Chronicle, October 1, 1909, Page 9. | part 2 |

1910 "Rochester Waterworks," Fire and Water Engineering 48(12):198-200 (September 21, 1910) | Part 2 48(13):219-221 (September 28, 1910) | also here | Part 2 |

1910 Journal of the New England Water Works Association  24(4):473-636  (December, 1910).  Includes several articles about Rochester.
Page 623: The Twenty-Ninth Annual Convention of the New England Water Works Association was held at Rochester, N. Y., September 21, 22 and 23, 1910.
Pages 473-482: "Memoranda Relative to Rochester," by Edwin A. Fisher
Pages 482-485: "Rochester Parks," by C. C. Laney
Pages 485-492: "A rambling description of the water works," by Berkman C. Little
Pages 492-498: "Pertinent matters relating to the water works," by Frederick T. Elwood
Pages 498-503: "Cobb's Hill Reservoir," by John F. Skinner.
Pages 503-514: "The purification plant of the Rochester and Lake Ontario Water Company," by James M. Caird.

1911 Sanborn Fire Insurance Map from Rochester, Monroe County, New York. Volume 1 | Volume 2 | Volume 3 | Volume 4 | Volume 5 |

1911 A Sanitary Survey of Rochester, N. Y., by Caroline Bartlett Crane
Pages 9-10:  Another danger to the water within the city's limits is not theoretical. It was exemplified last fall when by-passes were accidentally established between the Hemlock Lake water mains and the river mains, resulting in a sharp rise in the typhoid rate, with several consequent deaths. This accident happened during the progress of some public construction work. It was discovered through complaints to the Health Officer of peculiar appearance of the water, which resulted in examinations of water from various points to isolate the source of the" trouble.
When it was discovered, the pipes were disconnected, warnings were issued to boil the water, and vigorous measures were also taken to prevent a crop of secondary typhoid cases. Danger from this accident cannot be said to be past, since it is quite uncertain when polluted pipes may safely be regarded as again clean.
Responsibility for this grave accident has not been located, and I am surprised to find that the effort to locate it is apparently dropped.

1912 Application of the Rochester and Lake Ontario Water Company for permission to extend its mains into the town of Irondeqoit.  Approved July 31, 1912.  New York State Conservation Commission
Now supplying in addition the villages of Penfield, Pittsford and East Rochester and the territory contiguous thereto..

1913 "Rochester Water Works Bonds," Fire and Water Engineering 54:84  (August 6, 1913)
Rochester, N.Y., is one of two cities in that State in which the bonds issued to obtain funds for water works purposes are not exempted from the total debt.  Rochester's water works indebtedness is close to $10.000,000, and the limit fixed by the constitution, being 10 per cent. of the total valuation, is about $16,000,000. so that with the water works bonds and notes subtracted there is only a margin of $6.000,000 for other improvement work. It is estimated that Rochester’s water works system is worth $20,000,000, if not more, and private corporations have indicated their willingness to pay this for it. There is some agitation looking toward an effort to have a constitutional amendment passed exempting these bonds and enabling Rochester to extend its debt limit in order that funds may be available for such other improvements as may be deemed of importance.

1913 Report on the Steel Plate Pipe Conduit II of the Rochester Water Works, by John F. Skinner, Principal Assistant Engineering, December, 1913.

1914 Application of the Water Commissioners of the Monroe Water District of the town of Brighton for the approval of plans.  Approved June 11, 1914.  Conservation Commission Water Supply Application No. 163.

1914 Stubbs v. City of Rochester, 163 App Div 245, 148 N.Y.S. 804, July 7, 1914, Appellate Division of the Supreme Court of New York, Fourth Department
Typhoid outbreak from cross-connection between the Hemlock and Holly systems in the summer of 1910.

1914 "Emil Kuichling," The New York Times, November 11, 1914, Page 13.

1915 "Water Works Bureau," from Government of the City of Rochester, N. Y.: General Survey, Critical Appraisal and Constructive Suggestions, by Bureau of Municipal Research 

1918 Sanborn Fire Insurance Map from Rochester, Monroe County, New York. November, 1918

1918 "Third Conduit In Operation," Rochester Democrat and Chronicle, December 13, 1918, Page 28.
Delivering Water to City Reservoir in Highland Park.

1919 Sanborn Fire Insurance Map from Rochester, Monroe County, New York. January, 1919

1919 Sanborn Fire Insurance Map from Rochester, Monroe County, New York. February, 1919

1919 "Canadice Lake Turned In," Rochester Democrat and Chronicle, February 25, 1919, Page 17.

1919 Stubbs v. City of Rochester, 226 N.Y. 516, 124 N.E. 137 (1919).  | Also see 163 App. Div. 245 (N.Y. App. Div. 1914) | and here |

1920 Sanborn Fire Insurance Map from Rochester, Monroe County, New York. January, 1920

1920 "The Revenue Chargeable to Public Uses of Water in the City of Rochester, New York," by Stephen B. Story, Journal of the American Water Works Association, 7(6) 869-879 (November, 1920) | also here |

1921 Report of a survey of the Rochester water works : submitted to the Board of Trustees by Rochester Bureau of Municipal Research.  Written by Stephen B. Story, April, 1921.  This is scanned from a mimeograph copy, many thanks to Sara Dougherty for doing the scanning at the Local History Room of the Rochester Public Library.                       

1922 Sanborn Fire Insurance Map from Rochester, Monroe County, New York. June, 1922

1922 Sanborn Fire Insurance Map from Rochester, Monroe County, New York. July, 1922

1922 Rochester in History, editor by Henry C. Mains.
Page 147: Chapter XXXVI - The Waterworks.

1923 Sanborn Fire Insurance Map from Rochester, Monroe County, New York. April, 1923

1923 Flow of Water in Pipes, by Hiram Francis Mills
Rochester Conduits I & II

1923 Sanborn Fire Insurance Map from Rochester, Monroe County, New York. May, 1923

1924 "Sodium Iodide Treatment of Rochester's Water Supply (with discussion)," by Beekman C. Little, Journal of the American Water Works Association 12(1):68-86 (September, 1924) | also here |

1924 "Sources of Supply, Conduits and Reservoirs, of the Rochester, N. Y. Water-Works System," by John F. Skinner, read September 30, 1924. Journal of the New England Water Works Association 38(3):219-225 (September, 1924)

1925 History of the Genesee country (western New York) comprising the counties of Allegany, Cattaraugus, Chautauqua, Chemung, Erie, Genesee, Livingston, Monroe, Niagara, Ontario, Orleans, Schuyler, Steuben, Wayne, Wyoming and Yates, Volume II, edited by Lockwood R. Doty
Pages 810-812:  The question of pure water has never been a troublesome one in the city of Rochester. The clean, sparkling water of today has a different source from the water of the pioneer days. Then the pure water of the Genesee was available. The growth of the city along the banks of the Genesee in time rendered the water unfit for human consumption, whereupon other means were resorted to for the necessary supply.
As early as 1835 the Rochester Water Works Company was incorporated with a capital of $10,000. Nothing came of this project and for many years the Erie Canal and Genesee River were depended upon for a supply of water in case of fire. In 1852 another company was incorporated with a capital of $800,000 and authority to issue bonds for an equal amount. Mains were laid to connect the city with three small lakes in Livingston County. The plant was poorly constructed and when the money had all been expended expert engineers reported that it would require $410,000 to complete the work. The bondholders began foreclosure proceedings and a long period of litigation followed.
In the year 1872 the legislature passed an act authorizing the appointment of five commissioners to construct a system of water works at the expense of the city. Mayor Wilder appointed William H. Bowman, Roswell Hart, Charles C. Morse, Gilman H. Perkins and Edward M. Smith. They decided upon a gravity system from Hemlock Lake, twenty-eight miles south of the city and 385 feet higher, with an auxiliary supply from the Genesee River, for which the Holly pumping system was to be used. Despite legal obstacles work was begun in the spring of 1873. The first conduit was begun in July of that year and completed in February, 1876.  On February 18, 1874, the Holly system was tested and found to be satisfactory, thus insuring the city a supply of water for fire protection.  Work was then pushed forward on the Hemlock system.  Two reservoirs were constructed — one in the town of Rush and the other in Highland park, in the southern part of the city.  On January 23, 1876 the water was turned into the mains and first used by the people of Rochester.
The original cost of the system was $3,518,000; between ten and eleven million dollars have been expended since that time in additions and improvements. The Cobb’s Hill reservoir has been constructed;  Canadice Lake, a short distance east of Hemlock and 200 feet higher,  has been added to the supply.  In 1876 the board of water commissioners was succeeded by the executive board which was given authority over the waterworks.
In 1902 the Rochester and Lake Ontario Water Company was created to supply water from the lake to suburban Rochester and nearby villages.  The first pipe was laid by this company on June 2, 1904, and the first pumping was done December 15th following.  Due to the annexation since then of nearly all of this outlying territory to the city, most of the company’s business is now done within the Rochester city limits.  Extensive service is also given to the farmers, the water being available to them not only for potable purposes, but for irrigation and fire protection.

1927 Report on the Rochester Water Works, by Harrison Prescott Eddy, Allen Hazen, and Edwin A. Fisher, March 27, 1927.

1927 Rochester and Lake Ontario Water Company filed a certificate of extension of territory allowing it to serve the towns of Irondequoit, Pittsford, Perington and Penfield.  July 5, 1927.

1927 Petition of the City of Rochester to the New York State Water Power and Control Commission for Permission to Provide Additional Facilities for Water Supply Honeoye Lake-Mud Creek.  Memorandum and Permitting Modification of Plan, December 14, 1927.  Water Power and Control Commission Water Supply Application No. 439

1928 "The Water Supply of Rochester, N. Y.," by Irving E. Matthews, Journal of the American Water Works Association, 19(3):239-252 (March, 1928)

1928 An act to amend the conservation law, in relation to the powers of the water power and control commission as to the water supply of the city of Rochester.  April 6, 1928.

1928 Petition of the City of Rochester to the New York State Water Power and Control Commission for Permission to Provide Additional Facilities for Water Supply Honeoye Lake-Mud Creek.  Memorandum; Application approved as modified, June 22, 1928.  Water Power and Control Commission Water Supply Application No. 439

1928 The Rochester and Lake Ontario Water Service Company was formed by the consolidation of the Rochester and Lake Ontario Water Company and the Clyde Water Supply Company.  July 26, 1928.  This corporation was a subsidiary of the Federal Water Service Corporation.

1929 Publications of the Rochester Historical Society, Volume 8
Pages 109-124:  History of Engineering in Rochester, by Edwin A. Fisher
Pages 113-117:  Rochester Water Works

1930 "Biggest Steel Reservoir in America Done," Rochester Democrat and Chronicle, May 24, 1930, Page 11.

1930 "Diggers Find Wooden Mains Decades Old," Democrat and Chronicle, November 27, 1930, Page 31.  Remains of Rochester Water Works Company wooden conduit found in East Henrietta Street during construction of a tunnel from the Iola Power House to the Monroe Community Hospital.

1930 Petition of the City of Rochester to the New York State Water Power and Control Commission for Permission to Provide Additional Facilities for Water Supply Honeoye Lake-Mud Creek.  Amended decision December 9, 1930.  Water Power and Control Commission Water Supply Application No. 439

1931 Application of the Rochester & Lake Ontario Water Service Corporation for Approval of Its Acquisition of the Plant and Water System Formerly Owned and Operated by the Clyde Water Supply Company, in the Village of Clyde, County of Wayne, Upon the Consolidation of Said Clyde Water Supply Company With the Rochester and Lake Ontario Water Company, and for Approval of Its Plant and System as at Present Existing, Known as its "Clyde Plant."  July 13, 1931.  Water Power and Control Commission Water Supply Application No. 622

1931 Application of Rochester and Lake Ontario Water Service Corporation for Approval of Its Existing Plant and System Known as Its Rochester Plant, October 28, 1931.  Water Power and Control Commission Water Supply Application No. 649.
Page 267:  There are two steel standpipes on Cobbs  hill, about 400 feet above the level of the lake. The first is 150  feet in diameter and twenty feet high and holds 2.64 million  gallons. The second, built in 1930, is 200  feet in  diameter and twenty-five feet high and holds six million gallons. 

1932 "History and Engineering of Rochester's Water Supply in its First Century," by Edwin A. Fisher, Proceedings of the Rochester Academy of Science, 7(3):59-95 (March, 1932) | also here |

1932 Report on the Rochester water works, by Edmund M. Alling,  Business District Association, Inc. November 3, 1932.

1932 Petition of the City of Rochester to the New York State Water Power and Control Commission, for Permission to Divert Water Into Hemlock Lake for Water Supply, Application dismissed, August 13, 1932, Water Supply Application No. 438

1934 Application of the city of Rochester for Approval of Its Acquisition of an Emergency Source of Water Supply and of Its Plans for the Construction of an Emergency Pumping Station and Connecting Mains. THIRD APPLICATION.  Application approved as modified, July 24, 1934.  Water Power and Control Commission. Water Supply Application No. 857

1934 Report of Water Committee on additional supply and equalization of water rates to the City Council, by Morgan D Hayes, Chairman, September 10, 1934. | Map showing present and proposed sources of water supply and conduit lines |

1936 "Pioneering in the Water Works Field," by Morgan D. Hayes, Journal of the American Water Works Association, 28(1):22-29 (January, 1936)

1938 Sanborn Fire Insurance Map from Rochester, Monroe County, New York. Volume 1 (south) | Volume 4 | Volume 5 |Volumes 6 and 7 |

1940 "Rochester Guards Against Typhoid," The Cornell Daily Sun, December 13, 1940, Page 8.

1940 "Rochester Fears Typhoid Outbreak," St. Petersburg Times, December 14, 1940, Page 9.

1941 "The Pollution and Emergency Disinfection of Rochester's Water Supply," by Earl Devendorf, Journal of the American Water Works Association, 33(8):1334-1356 (August, 1941)

1942 Application of the City of Rochester for Approval of Its Acquisition of an Emergency Source of Water Supply and of Its Plans for the Construction, of an Emergency Pumping Station and Connecting Mains. Application approved as modified, waterworks system approved as constructed and operation thereof by city of Rochester authorized.  March 31, 1942. FIFTH APPLICATION. Water Power and Control Commission. Water Supply Application No. 1525.

1942 Application of Rochester and Lake Ontario Water Service Company for Approval of Its Proposed Construction of Additional Intake Capacity in Lake Ontario and the Taking of Additional Water Up to Approximately 18,000,000 Gallons Daily, Through the Existing and the Additional Intake Pipes. Application approved as modified May 26, 1942. THIRD APPLICATION.  Water Power and Control Commission.  Water Supply Application No. 1544

1943 Application of the Monroe Avenue Water District for Approval of Its Acquisition of a Source of Water Supply and for Its Financial and Engineering Plans Used in the Construction of the Water Supply System. Application approved as modified, waterworks system approved as constructed and operation thereof by board of water commissioners of Monroe Avenue Water District authorized, October 26, 1943.  SECOND APPLICATION Water Supply Application No. 1591

1945 Application of the City of Rochester, Monroe County, for Approval of Its Financial and Engineering Plans for the Improvement, Extension, Rehabilitation and Enlargement of Its Water Supply System. Application approved as modified, October 2, 1945. SIXTH APPLICATION.  Water Power and Control Commission. Water Supply Application No. 1609

1945 Rochester The Water-Power City 1812-1854, by Blake McKelvey
Page 110:  A lane, opening into Carroll (State) Street, provided access to the public "reservoir" fed by a log "aqueduct" which carried the overflow of the Red Mill thirty rods north to a central water trough for the use of both fire fighters and thirsty horses.
Page 248:  The most serious instance of civic complacency was the failure to make any provision for a water system. Authority to raise funds for this purpose, granted in Rochester's first city charter, spurred study of the problem. Mayor Johnson presented a detailed plan in 1838 for a public water works to be constructed section by section as needed, with the total capital cost of $150,000 spread over a period of years and the water rates pledged for the payment of the bonds. The savings enjoyed through a reduction in the excessive fire insurance rates would, Johnson argued, more than cancel the individual's water payments, leaving the health benefits and other assets as clear gain.
Pages 336-337:  A more serious handicap resulted from the limited water supply. Stimulated in part by Buffalo's successful action in 1852, a Rochester Water Works Company was chartered that year and a survey made which indicated the feasibility of a plan to tap Hemlock Lake, some thirty miles south of the city. The estimated cost, $575,000, postponed further action, however, compelling the council to make new appropriations for small underground reservoirs.
Page 337:  William A. Reynolds, Minutes of Rochester Water Works Company, May 31 - Oct 24, 1855, MSS, Roch. Hist. Soc.  [This is no longer in the possession of the Rochester Historical Society.]

1947 Survival And Retirement Experience With Water Works Facilities A Committee Report, by American Water Works Association, Inc.
Pages 295-306: Rochester (Suburban), New York As of December 31, 1940.

1948 Application of the City of Rochester for Approval of Its Financial and Engineering  Plans for Improvement, Extension, Rehabilitation and· Enlargement of Its Water Supply System. Application modified as requested, December 7, 1948.  Modifying Decision.  Extension of Time.  Water Supply Application No. l609

1949 "Rochester and Its Water Works," Monthly Bulletin of the Rochester Bureau of Municipal Research, No. 145:581-184 (December, 1949).

1949 Rochester The Flower City 1855-1890, by Blake McKelvey

1950 Application for Approval of Increased Purchases of Water from Eastman Kodak Company and of Maps and Plans for Increasing Water Delivery Facilities Incidental Thereto. Application, maps and plans approved as modified; water works system approved as constructed; operation thereof authorized, January 16, 1950. SEVENTH APPLICATION Water Supply Application No. 1976

1950 "Rochester and Its Water Works," Monthly Bulletin of the Rochester Bureau of Municipal Research, No. 147:589-592 (March-April 1950).

1950 Rochester and Lake Ontario Water Service Corporation merged with the New York Water Service Corporation on April 12, 1950.

1950 An act to amend the public authorities law, in relation to the creation of the Monroe county water authority, and providing for the powers and duties of the authority.  April 20, 1950.

1950 Application of Rochester and Lake Ontario Water Service Corporation, for Approval of Construction of Two Wells Having a Total Capacity of Not Less than 2,000,000 Gallons per Day or More than 3,000,000 Gallons per Day.  Application, maps and plans approved as modified.  May 3, 1950. FOURTH APPLICATION Water Supply Application No. 2020

1950 Application of City of Rochester, Petitioner, for Approval of Taking of Additional Quantities of Water from Lake Ontario for Water Supply System, and of Plans in Connection Therewith. Application, maps and plans approved as modified, August 1, 1950. EIGHTH APPLICATION Water Supply Application No. 2030

1950 Application of the City of Rochester, for Approval of Financial and Engineering Plans for Improvement, Extension, Rehabilitation and Enlargement of Water Supply System.  Application, maps and plans modified, December 12, 1950. MODIFYING DECISION. EXTENSION OF TIME Water Supply Application No. 1609

1950 Sanborn Fire Insurance Map from Rochester, Monroe County, New York. Volume 1 | Volume 1 (south) | Volume 2 |Volume 3 | Volume 4 | Volume 5 | Volumes 6 and 7 |

1951 An act to amend the public authorities law, in relation to the Monroe county water authority, and repealing section one thousand one hundred twelve of such law, relating thereto.  March 19, 1951.

1952 Application of the Monroe County Water Authority, to purchase water from the City of Rochester.  Application, maps and plans approved as modified, July 23, 1952.  Water Supply Application No. 2241.

1954 Application of Village of Honeoye Falls for Approval of Acquisition of Source of Water Supply from Rochester, New York, Hemlock Water Main Pursuant to Contract Between City of Rochester and Monroe County Water Authority, and for Permission to Contract for Same with Monroe County Water Authority, and Extension of Temporary Permit under Which Hemlock Water Is Now Being Supplied to Said Village. Application, maps and plans approved as modified, August 24, 1954. FOURTH APPLICATION Water Supply Application No. 2585

1954 Application of the Monroe County Water Authority to Purchase Water from City of Rochester.  Decision modified as requested, August 29, 1954. MODIFYING DECISION. Water Supply Application No. 2241

1954 Rochester and its water works : the story of one city's quest for a domestic supply of pure and wholesome water, 1834-1954, September 1954, Rochester Bureau of Municipal Research

1954 Application of New York Water Service Corporation for Approval of Use of Intake into Lake Ontario of the Rochester Gas and Electric Company as Auxiliary Source of Supply, and Pipe Line to Connect to Same. Application, maps and plans approved as modified, November 9, 1954. ROCHESTER PLANT. FIFTH APPLICATION. Water Supply Application No. 2315

1954 Application of the Monroe County Water Authority for Approval of Acquisition of Water Supply and Distribution System of New York Water Service Corporation Constituting All Real and Personal Property Thereof Appertaining to Waterworks Systems Owned and Operated Thereby within Boundaries of Monroe County, and Approval of Financial and Engineering Plans for Acquisition of Water Supply and Distribution System. Application, maps and plans approved as modified, November 9, 1954. SECOND APPLICATION Water Supply Application No. 2615

1954 Application of the Monroe County Water Authority for Approval of Acquisition of Water Supply and Distribution System of New York Water Service Corporation Constituting All Real and Personal Property Thereof Appertaining to Waterworks Systems Owned and Operated Thereby within Boundaries of Monroe County, and Approval of Financial and Engineering Plans for Acquisition of Water Supply and Distribution System. Decision Modified as indicated, December 14, 1954. SECOND APPLICATION.  MODIFYING DECISION Water Supply Application No. 2615

1956 Application of Monroe Avenue Water District, Town of Brighton, Monroe County, for Approval of Extensions of District and Engineering Plans for Construction of Water Supply System Therein.  Application, maps and plans approved as modified, May 15, 1956. FOURTH APPLICATION Water Supply Application No. 2967

1956 Application of Monroe Avenue Water District, Town of Brighton, Monroe County, for Approval of Extensions of District and Engineering Plans for Construction of Water Supply System Therein.  Application, maps and plans approved as modified, August 7, 1956. FOURTH APPLICATION. MODIFYING DECISION. Water Supply Application No. 2967

1956 "The History of Public Health in Rochester, New York," by Blake McKelvey, Rochester History 18(3):1-28 (July, 1956)
Page 10:  A Water Works Company, organized in 1852, failed to attract investors and turned its charter over to a new group in 1855, but several leading taxpayers obstructed its effort to persuade the city to take a large block of stock in order to launch the project.  The council did, however, create the post of city surveyor, at a salary of $1700, with the object of securing expert advice on the water problem.  His able report favored the use of Hemlock Lake water over that from Ontario and upheld the feasibility of the company's plans, comparing the proposed system favorably with water works in other cities; yet neither the city not the company raised the necessary funds.

1956 Rochester The Quest for Quality 1890-1925, by Blake McKelvey

1957 Application of New York Water Service Corporation for Approval of Use of Intake into Lake Ontario of the Rochester Gas and Electric Company as Auxiliary Source of Supply, and Pipe Line to Connect to Same. Original decision modified as requested, April 2, 1957. ROCHESTER PLANT. FIFTH APPLICATION. MODIFYING DECISION. Water Supply Application No. 2315-A

1957 Application of the Monroe County Water Authority to Purchase Additional Water from City of Rochester.  Application, maps and plans approved as modified, April 2, 1957.  THIRD APPLICATION.  Water Supply Application No. 3188.

1957 Application of New York Water Service Corporation for Approval of Taking Water from City of Rochester That Has Been Released by Monroe County Water Authority.  Application, maps and plans approved as modified, April 2, 1957.  ROCHESTER PLANT.  SIXTH APPLICATION.  Water Supply Application No. 3189.

1957 Application of the Consolidated Water District, Town of Greece, for Approval of Acquisition of Source of Water Supply and Financial and Engineering Plant for Construction of Water Supply System to Serve Extension No. 39, Greece Consolidated Water District.  Application, maps and plans approved as modified, waterworks system approved as constructed and operation thereof authorized subject to signing of certain contracts referred to herein, April 2, 1957.  GREECE CONSOLIDATED WATER DISTRICT.  EIGHTH APPLICATION.  Water Supply Application No. 3196.

1957 Application of the Monroe Avenue Water District, Town of Brighton, Monroe County, for Approval of Brighton School District No. 2 Extension of Said District and Financial and Engineering Plans for Construction of Water Supply System Therein.  Application, maps and plans approved as modified, May 7, 1957.  FIFTH APPLICATION.  Water Supply Application 3197.

1959 "Water Unit Closes Deal," Rochester Democrat and Chronicle, March 6, 1959, Page 9.
The Monroe county Water Authority yesterday plunked down $10,720,783.44 for the local system of the New York Water Service Corp. and thereby, at last, set itself up in the water-producing business.

1961 Rochester: an emerging metropolis, 1925-1961, by Blake McKelvey

1962 "Rochester," from Public Water Supplies of the 100 Largest Cities in the United States, 1962, US Geological Survey Water Supply Paper 1812, by Charles Norman Durfor and Edith Becker

1966 "Brighton Board Takes Over Water District," Rochester Democrat and Chronicle, January 12, 1966, Page 27.

1972 "Water for Rochester," by Blake McKelvey, Rochester History 34(3):1-24 (July 1972)

1977 "Water Works History: A Comparison of Albany, Utica, Syracuse, and Rochester" by Joseph W. Barnes, Rochester History 39(3):1-24 (July 1977) 

1978 "The Erie Canal Ring, Samuel J. Tilden, and the Democratic Party," by Thomas J. Archdeacon, New York History 59(4):408-429 (October 1978)

2013 A Pocket History of Rochester's Water Works

2014 Engineer Joseph Nelson Tubbs and Rochester’s first water supply system, by Luis Felipe Bendezu. Paper for Speaking Stones REL 167, December 10, 2014

2019 The Rochester Water Works Companies: 1835-1872, PowerPoint Presentation for Rochester's Rich History, February 16, 2019

2020 Water for Rochester, at Last, PowerPoint Presentation for Rochester's Rich History, February 15, 2020

Maps

1872 Map of Brighton showing the reservoir built by the Rochester Water Works Company on South Avenue.

1872 Map of Livonia, Livingston County
Shows the outlet of Hemlock Lake and the Hoppough Mill pond, including two adjacent properties owned by W. R. Utley..

1872 Map of Livonia, Livingston County
Shows the outlet of Hemlock Lake

These topographic maps show the lakes, rivers, and creeks involved in the Rochester water works.

USGS 1:62:500 Topographic Map of Rochester (1895) Northwest Northeast Southwest Southeast
USGS 1:62:500 Topographic Map of Rochester (1920) Northwest Northeast Southwest Southeast
USGS 1:62:500 Topographic Map of Honeoye (1904) Northwest Northeast Southwest Southeast

USGS 1:62,500 Topographic Maps Rochester (1920) Honeoye (1904) Wayland (1904)

These plat books show the location of Conduits I, II & III in Monroe County and the City of Rochester.

1924 Plat Book of Monroe County Honeoye Falls Village Mendon Rush Henrietta Brighton Brighton
1926 Plat Book of the City of Rochester Rochester Plate 37 Rochester Plate 33



Genesee River Watershed Map

A History Time Line of the Hemlock Water Reservoir

Rochester Village Trustee and City Council Proceedings 1817-1900 |
Copies at Google Books: | 1869-70 | 1873-74 | 1874-75 | 1875-76 | 1879-80 | 1880-81 | 1881-82 | 1884-85 | 1888-89 | 1889-90 | 1904 |
Other copies | 1853-54 | 1854-55 | 1855-56 | 1856-57 | 1861-62 | 1865-66 | 1868-69 |

Rochester Newspaper Index

Rochester History Journal

Historic USGS Topographic Maps

Rochester Images includes maps pictures of the reservoirs and pipeline construction |  List of Plat Maps in Rochester Images |

Rochester City Directories

| Rochester Republican 1829-1849 | Rochester Daily Democrat 1840-1857 | Rochester Evening Express 1860-1882 | Rochester Express February 1863 to February 1864 | Rochester Democrat and Chronicle 1872-1970 | Rochester Union-Advertiser 1862-1885 |

Rochester history resources

Many thanks to my colleague Sara Dougherty for scanning several documents document held by the Rochester Public Library.


© 2016 Morris A. Pierce